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  1. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    22 Aug '12 04:09
    The TR-3B has a circular, plasma filled accelerator ring called the Magnetic Field Disrupter. The mercury based plasma is pressurized at 250,000 atmospheres at a temperature of 150 degrees Kelvin, and accelerated to 50,000 rpm to create a super-conductive plasma with the resulting gravity disruption.

    Fact or fiction? I saw a similar craft fly pretty low right overhead about 12 years ago.
  2. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    22 Aug '12 04:45 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ChessPraxis
    The TR-3B has a circular, plasma filled accelerator ring called the Magnetic Field Disrupter. The mercury based plasma is pressurized at 250,000 atmospheres at a temperature of 150 degrees Kelvin, and accelerated to 50,000 rpm to create a super-conductive plasma with the resulting gravity disruption.

    Fact or fiction? I saw a similar craft fly pretty low right overhead about 12 years ago.
    You mean this guy?

    http://www.handpen.com/Bio/gravity.htm

    Here is some real world work on the superconductive rotating ring idea:

    http://www.esa.int/esaMI/GSP/SEM0L6OVGJE_0.html
  3. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    22 Aug '12 04:59
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    You mean this guy?

    http://www.handpen.com/Bio/gravity.htm

    Here is some real world work on the superconductive rotating ring idea:

    http://www.esa.int/esaMI/GSP/SEM0L6OVGJE_0.html
    Thanks for that sonhouse.
  4. Standard member menace71
    Can't win a game of
    05 Sep '12 03:02
    http://www.deepspace4.com/pages/science/flayingtriangle/flayingtriangle3tr-3b.htm

    Might be hoaky but a google search brings up tons of stuff like this.


    Manny
  5. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    05 Sep '12 04:14
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJJ-4lnwrck
  6. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    05 Sep '12 19:47 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ChessPraxis
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJJ-4lnwrck
    One thing he mentions, needing to get to 150 degrees Kelvin. There is zero possibility of having Einstein condensates at that high a temperature.

    Present day condensates are something like 1/1,000,000 th of a degree Kelvin.
  7. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    05 Sep '12 22:33
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    One thing he mentions, needing to get to 150 degrees Kelvin. There is zero possibility of having Einstein condensates at that high a temperature.

    Present day condensates are something like 1/1,000,000 th of a degree Kelvin.
    Good point, here's CP's easy to understand temp chart for the gen. populace:
    F. 0 =very cold...100=very hot
    C. 0= chilly...100=dead
    K. 0=dead...100=dead
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    05 Sep '12 23:40
    Originally posted by ChessPraxis
    Good point, here's CP's easy to understand temp chart for the gen. populace:
    F. 0 =very cold...100=very hot
    C. 0= chilly...100=dead
    K. 0=dead...100=dead
    Also, 1 degree Kelvin is -272 degrees C. -458 degrees F.
  9. 06 Sep '12 13:01
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    One thing he mentions, needing to get to 150 degrees Kelvin. There is zero possibility of having Einstein condensates at that high a temperature.

    Present day condensates are something like 1/1,000,000 th of a degree Kelvin.
    Condensates in cold atomic gases, yes. But the electrons in a superconductor can equally be regarded as a Bose-Einstein condensate, where pairs of fermions form a composite boson called a Cooper pair. The main reason the condensates in cold gases are so extremely cold is because they are also very dilute, and the lower you make the density, the lower the transition temperature for the phase transition becomes. A cold gas BEC is metastable, and its lifetime becomes longer if the condensate is more dilute, which is why people don't go to higher densities to obtain higher phase transition temperatures.
  10. 07 Sep '12 14:33
    Originally posted by ChessPraxis
    Good point, here's CP's easy to understand temp chart for the gen. populace:
    F. 0 =very cold...100=very hot
    C. 0= chilly...100=dead
    K. 0=dead...100=dead
    There are even easier (and more exact) rules of thumb for three of these numbers. 100 F is roughly body temperature. 0 C is the freezing point of water at sea level - i.e., any well-stirred mixture of (pure) water and ice is at 0 C. 100 C is the boiling point of water at sea level - i.e., your boiling kettle is at that temperature. (Nor does it mean death, per se - it's quite touchable, if you're careful. It's little more dangerous than freezing water. Just don't stay in it for longer than a few seconds.)

    0 K is in theory equally easy to remember - absolute zero, nothing is colder - but to a human body, the difference between 0 and 100 K is, well, irrelevant.

    Richard