1. Standard memberThequ1ck
    Fast above
    Slow Below
    Joined
    29 Sep '03
    Moves
    25914
    21 Mar '08 07:32
    god
    O.E. god "supreme being, deity," from P.Gmc.
    *guthan (cf. Du. god, Ger. Gott, O.N. guð, Goth. guþ😉,
    from PIE *ghut- "that which is invoked" (cf. Skt. huta-
    "invoked," an epithet of Indra), from root *gheu(e)-
    "to call, invoke." But some trace it to PIE *ghu-to- "poured,"
    from root *gheu- "to pour, pour a libation"
    (source of Gk. khein "to pour," khoane "funnel" and khymos "juice;"
    also in the phrase khute gaia "poured earth," referring to a burial mound).

    It seems that the origins of the term 'god' refer to the spirit immanent
    in a burial mound. I wonder how it changed to the more encompassing
    modern day version?
  2. Standard memberThequ1ck
    Fast above
    Slow Below
    Joined
    29 Sep '03
    Moves
    25914
    21 Mar '08 07:401 edit
    "I want my lawyer, my tailor, my servants, even my wife to believe in God,
    because it means that I shall be cheated and robbed and cuckolded less often. ...
    If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him." [Voltaire]

    Was it necessary to invent the word 'God' in our dictionaries to describe
    a supreme being or to describe a system of control?
  3. Joined
    02 Aug '06
    Moves
    12622
    21 Mar '08 20:22
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    "I want my lawyer, my tailor, my servants, even my wife to believe in God,
    because it means that I shall be cheated and robbed and cuckolded less often. ...
    If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him." [Voltaire]

    Was it necessary to invent the word 'God' in our dictionaries to describe
    a supreme being or to describe a system of control?
    Did you know Isaac Asimov wrote a commentary on the Bible?

    I read some of it. Not too much.
  4. Joined
    27 Sep '06
    Moves
    9651
    22 Mar '08 11:06
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    "I want my lawyer, my tailor, my servants, even my wife to believe in God,
    because it means that I shall be cheated and robbed and cuckolded less often. ...
    If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him." [Voltaire]

    Was it necessary to invent the word 'God' in our dictionaries to describe
    a supreme being or to describe a system of control?
    The invention is, "there is no God."
  5. Standard memberThequ1ck
    Fast above
    Slow Below
    Joined
    29 Sep '03
    Moves
    25914
    24 Mar '08 04:291 edit
    Originally posted by josephw
    The invention is, "there is no God."
    In this life, in this life, in this life
    In this oh sweet life
    We're coming in from the cold
    We're coming in, coming in, coming in
    Coming in from the cold

    It's you, it's you, it's you I'm talking to
    Well you, it's you, it's you
    It's you I'm talking to now
    Why do you look so sad and foresaken
    When one door is closed
    Don't you know another is open

    Would you let the system
    Make you kill your brotherman
    No dread no
    Would you make the system
    Make you kill your brotherman
    No dread no
    Would you make the system
    Get on top of your head again
    No dread no
    Well the biggest man you ever
    Did see was just a baby

    - Coming in from the cold. - Bob Marley
  6. Cape Town
    Joined
    14 Apr '05
    Moves
    52945
    25 Mar '08 07:00
    Originally posted by josephw
    The invention is, "there is no God."
    Do you believe that that was invented? Or were you just being rude?
    What about religions other than your own? Did they invent their gods?
  7. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52615
    25 Mar '08 09:31
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Do you believe that that was invented? Or were you just being rude?
    What about religions other than your own? Did they invent their gods?
    Whether they invented them or not has nothing to do with the existance or non-existance of god, the two concepts are completely separate. God may or may not exist but certainly not because some person just up and said, there is a god, therefore there is a god.
  8. Joined
    02 Aug '06
    Moves
    12622
    25 Mar '08 13:18
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Whether they invented them or not has nothing to do with the existance or non-existance of god, the two concepts are completely separate. God may or may not exist but certainly not because some person just up and said, there is a god, therefore there is a god.
    That depends upon how the person acts. One person saying there is a God may not mean too much.

    Another person saying so and acting in a convincing way that there really is, has to be taken more seriously.
  9. Cape Town
    Joined
    14 Apr '05
    Moves
    52945
    25 Mar '08 13:50
    Originally posted by jaywill
    That depends upon how the person acts. One person saying there is a God may not mean too much.

    Another person saying so and acting in a convincing way that there really is, has to be taken more seriously.
    I think sonhouse was saying than in no way do such actions create reality.
  10. Cape Town
    Joined
    14 Apr '05
    Moves
    52945
    25 Mar '08 13:53
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Whether they invented them or not has nothing to do with the existance or non-existance of god, the two concepts are completely separate. God may or may not exist but certainly not because some person just up and said, there is a god, therefore there is a god.
    I agree, I just wanted to know whether he seriously thinks that atheists are essentially closet theists who 'invented' their professed beliefs.
  11. Standard memberPalynka
    Upward Spiral
    Halfway
    Joined
    02 Aug '04
    Moves
    8702
    26 Mar '08 09:471 edit
    Originally posted by Thequ1ck
    god
    O.E. god "supreme being, deity," from P.Gmc.
    *guthan (cf. Du. god, Ger. Gott, O.N. guð, Goth. guþ😉,
    from PIE *ghut- "that which is invoked" (cf. Skt. huta-
    "invoked," an epithet of Indra), from root *gheu(e)-
    "to call, invoke." But some trace it to PIE *ghu-to- "poured,"
    from root *gheu- "to pour, pour a libation"
    (source of Gk. khein "to und. I wonder how it changed to the more encompassing
    modern day version?
    This is very dependent on which language you chose, so I believe we can't really know much about the origin of that belief throught etimology alone.

    For example, in my own language we still keep the Latin word for God (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deus) which comes directly from the main Proto-Indo-European deity "Dyeus" (from which the name Zeus also stems from).
  12. Standard memberThequ1ck
    Fast above
    Slow Below
    Joined
    29 Sep '03
    Moves
    25914
    26 Mar '08 12:13
    Originally posted by Palynka
    This is very dependent on which language you chose, so I believe we can't really know much about the origin of that belief throught etimology alone.

    For example, in my own language we still keep the Latin word for God (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deus) which comes directly from the main Proto-Indo-European deity "Dyeus" (from which the name Zeus also stems from).
    'The word "Deus," through "Dei," is the root of deism, pandeism, panendeism, and polydeism, ironically all of which are theories in which any divine figure is absent from intervening in human affairs. This curious circumstance originates from the use of the word "deism" in the 17th and 18th centuries as a contrast to the prevailing "theism", belief in an actively intervening God'

    I'm beginning to wonder if the adaptations of how we perceive 'God'
    were in some part driven by the greater need for control as
    society grew and adapted. Could this also be the mark of our current
    situation and our need to yet again redefine 'God'?
Back to Top