1. Subscribersonhouse
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    03 Dec '11 21:07
    http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-11-explores-distrust-atheists-believers.html

    When you look at the article, you see the comments are bigger than the piece.
  2. SubscriberSuzianne
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    03 Dec '11 21:32
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-11-explores-distrust-atheists-believers.html

    When you look at the article, you see the comments are bigger than the piece.
    It's interesting (but not surprising) to see atheists embracing PC when it suits them.
  3. Subscribersonhouse
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    03 Dec '11 23:46
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    It's interesting (but not surprising) to see atheists embracing PC when it suits them.
    Political correctness?
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    04 Dec '11 00:07
    interesting. i wonder if there has been a study done on the mistrust of religious people by atheists?
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    04 Dec '11 00:18
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    interesting. i wonder if there has been a study done on the mistrust of religious people by atheists?
    I would imagine there is mutual hostility, but I would guess that most atheists would rate theists
    significantly higher than rapists (I mean seriously guys, rapists???).


    Now my personal view on the topic (particularly with respect to electing a representative) is that
    somebodies religion is of interest to me, partly because if that religion contains certain views that
    I disagree with, then that's relevant. But also because the quality of this persons judgement is
    important and if they are prepared to throw reason out the window once, then they may well do it
    again.

    That said, it's not the most important factor by far, and the 'party' line is also of significance, because
    lets face it, mostly you vote for party over candidate (sadly).

    But given two otherwise identical candidates where one was a theist and one an atheist I would pick
    the atheist. But as that situation has never arisen the religion of the candidate's I have voted for has
    never even come up.

    So the question is not just whether a bias exists, but how important it is to the person.

    Most Americans allegedly support flag burning being banned, but most don't care about it enough to sway
    their vote.
  6. Subscribersonhouse
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    04 Dec '11 00:26
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    I would imagine there is mutual hostility, but I would guess that most atheists would rate theists
    significantly higher than rapists (I mean seriously guys, rapists???).


    Now my personal view on the topic (particularly with respect to electing a representative) is that
    somebodies religion is of interest to me, partly because if that religion cont ...[text shortened]... pport flag burning being banned, but most don't care about it enough to sway
    their vote.
    An atheist would have as much chance of getting elected as Herman Cain since the majority of Americans believes in creation and a lot of them believe the Earth is 10,000 years old. Sad, really.
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    04 Dec '11 00:44
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    An atheist would have as much chance of getting elected as Herman Cain since the majority of Americans believes in creation and a lot of them believe the Earth is 10,000 years old. Sad, really.
    which is too bad. the bigotry of modern americans, not just against atheists, but against all non-christians, denies them the genius of most of the founders of the united states.
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    04 Dec '11 00:481 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    An atheist would have as much chance of getting elected as Herman Cain since the majority of Americans believes in creation and a lot of them believe the Earth is 10,000 years old. Sad, really.
    Probably true, however living and voting in the UK means voting for an atheist is a possibility.

    I may even have done so, most people don't care about a candidates religion so it doesn't often come up.

    EDIT: Actually I am not sure that creationism is quite the majority view in the US,
    last poll I saw had it in the high 40's... but I could be wrong.
  9. Subscribersonhouse
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    04 Dec '11 08:23
    Originally posted by googlefudge
    Probably true, however living and voting in the UK means voting for an atheist is a possibility.

    I may even have done so, most people don't care about a candidates religion so it doesn't often come up.

    EDIT: Actually I am not sure that creationism is quite the majority view in the US,
    last poll I saw had it in the high 40's... but I could be wrong.
    High 40's, low 40's, it's still sick.
  10. Wat?
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    04 Dec '11 11:21
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    High 40's, low 40's, it's still sick.
    Although of no scientific relevance, and I apologise for going off-topic as we are half-way off anyway, what does the US education system say about this matter, and is the high percentage of 'creationalistic' viewpoint of relevance in the education/teachers' curriculum system?

    -m.
  11. Standard memberRajk999
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    04 Dec '11 11:24
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    High 40's, low 40's, it's still sick.
    Misguided probably.
    But sick? Check the thread "The Bible Accepts Homosexuality' .. now that has some 'sick' stuff in it.
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