1. SubscriberFMF
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    15 Aug '12 09:23
    Anyone read of listened to Melvyn Bragg's "The Book of Books - The Radical Impact of The King James Bible 1611-2011"?

    Any thoughts?
  2. Cape Town
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    15 Aug '12 10:51
    Originally posted by FMF
    Anyone read of listened to Melvyn Bragg's "The Book of Books - The Radical Impact of The King James Bible 1611-2011"?

    Any thoughts?
    Never heard of it. Link?
    However, I wonder (from the title) if he is talking about the impact of the Bible in general, or that particular version as opposed to other versions?
  3. SubscriberFMF
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    15 Aug '12 11:43
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Never heard of it. Link?
    However, I wonder (from the title) if he is talking about the impact of the Bible in general, or that particular version as opposed to other versions?
    http://tinyurl.com/8z8efdt

    "The King James Bible has often been called 'the Book of Books' both in itself and in what it stands for. Since its publication in 1611 it has been the best-selling book in the world, and many believe it has had the greatest impact. The King James Bible has spread the Protestant faith. It has also been the greatest influence on the enrichment of the English language and its literature. It has been the Bible of wars from the British Civil War in the 17th century to the American Civil War two centuries later, and it has been carried into battle in innumerable conflicts since then.

    Its influence on social movements - particularly involving women in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries - and politics was profound. It was crucial to the growth of democracy. It was integral to the abolition of slavery and it defined attitudes to modern science, education and sex.

    Fascinating and eye-opening, The Book of Books reveals the extraordinary and still-felt impact of a work created 400 years ago. Stephen Thorne reads Melvyn Bragg's definitive history of the King James Bible."
  4. Cape Town
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    15 Aug '12 16:27
    It sounds to me like he doesn't know that the King James Bible is just one translation of many of a collection of books originally in another language.
  5. Standard memberRJHinds
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    15 Aug '12 16:37
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    It sounds to me like he doesn't know that the King James Bible is just one translation of many of a collection of books originally in another language.
    Can you enlighten us on the subject?
  6. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    15 Aug '12 21:02
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Never heard of it. Link?
    However, I wonder (from the title) if he is talking about the impact of the Bible in general, or that particular version as opposed to other versions?
    That particular version is tainted by British politics. It's named after a King after all!
  7. Standard memberRJHinds
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    15 Aug '12 22:532 edits
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    That particular version is tainted by British politics. It's named after a King after all!
    It also substitutes Easter for Passover, British religious politics of sorts, since Easter is derived from the Anglo-Saxon goddess Eostre.
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    16 Aug '12 05:53
    Originally posted by FMF
    http://tinyurl.com/8z8efdt

    "The King James Bible has often been called 'the Book of Books' both in itself and in what it stands for. Since its publication in 1611 it has been the best-selling book in the world, and many believe it has had the greatest impact. The King James Bible has spread the Protestant faith. It has also been the greatest influence on the ...[text shortened]... years ago. Stephen Thorne reads Melvyn Bragg's definitive history of the King James Bible."
    i think it's giving the book too much credit. sure it played a part in literature, but being integral in the abolition of slavery, women's suffrage, growth of democracy or attitudes towards modern science, education and sex... these are far fetched claims. if anything, it likely hampered these movements.

    i'd say the printing press played the biggest role in the growth of democracy, abolition of slavery, women's movements, and attitudes towards modern science, education and sex.
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    16 Aug '12 06:021 edit
    interesting articles

    pro-slavery mob storms abolitionist printing press warehouse and murders him. i wonder if they were carrying king james bibles with them.
    http://constitutioncenter.org/timeline/html/cw04_11999.html

    here, quakers in england use the printing press to publish anti-slavery pamphlets
    http://www.victorianweb.org/history/antislavery.html

    and the role of the press in the suffrage movement.
    http://castle.eiu.edu/historia/archives/1999/Slate.htm
  10. Standard memberRJHinds
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    16 Aug '12 06:10
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    i think it's giving the book too much credit. sure it played a part in literature, but being integral in the abolition of slavery, women's suffrage, growth of democracy or attitudes towards modern science, education and sex... these are far fetched claims. if anything, it likely hampered these movements.

    i'd say the printing press played the biggest ...[text shortened]... tion of slavery, women's movements, and attitudes towards modern science, education and sex.
    True, because the Holy Bible could be printed.
  11. Standard memberBosse de Nage
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    16 Aug '12 22:05
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    It sounds to me like he doesn't know that the King James Bible is just one translation of many of a collection of books originally in another language.
    I'm sure that would come as a total surprise to Melvyn Bragg 🙄
  12. Standard memberBosse de Nage
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    16 Aug '12 22:08
    Originally posted by FMF
    Anyone read of listened to Melvyn Bragg's "The Book of Books - The Radical Impact of The King James Bible 1611-2011"?

    Any thoughts?
    I don't care much for Melvyn Bragg, but the King James Bible was a primary vector of the Gutenberg technology (as McCluhan put it) in the English-speaking world, which by began to hypostatise at much the same time.
  13. Standard memberBosse de Nage
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    16 Aug '12 22:10
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    i think it's giving the book too much credit. sure it played a part in literature, but being integral in the abolition of slavery, women's suffrage, growth of democracy or attitudes towards modern science, education and sex... these are far fetched claims. if anything, it likely hampered these movements.

    i'd say the printing press played the biggest ...[text shortened]... tion of slavery, women's movements, and attitudes towards modern science, education and sex.
    Yes, and one of the most frequently printed items in the English-speaking world was the King James Bible.

    Why do you suppose he authorised the project in the first place?
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    16 Aug '12 23:14
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Yes, and one of the most frequently printed items in the English-speaking world was the King James Bible.

    Why do you suppose he authorised the project in the first place?
    covered.

    " sure it played a part in literature,..."
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