1. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
    rvsakhadeo
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    27 Sep '11 17:471 edit
    Omar Khayyam wrote some extraordinarily beautiful poetry way back in the 12th century. His Rubaiyat can be said to be Philosophy structured in a song.What were the themes in the Rubaiyat-Hedonism? or Agnosticism ? or Theism ? Some examples will indicate what I mean. Two first stanzas apply particularly to RHP Spirituality Forum.
    Firstly:
    Myself when young did eagerly frequent
    Doctor and Saint, and heard great Argument
    About it and About: but evermore
    came out by the same door wherein I went.

    And the second one:
    With them the seed of Wisdom did I sow
    and with mine own hand wrought to make it grow
    And this was all the harvest that I reaped
    " I came like water and like wind I go"
    And a particularly moving one but involving God also:
    Ah Love ! Could you and I with Him conspire
    To grasp this sorry scheme of things entire
    Would we not shatter it to bits--and then
    remould it nearer to the heart's desire
    Or an agnostic thought:
    There was the door to which I found no key
    There was the veil through which I might not see
    Some little talk awhile of me and thee
    there was --- and then no more of thee and me
    Comments please.
  2. Joined
    29 Dec '08
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    6788
    27 Sep '11 18:552 edits
    Originally posted by rvsakhadeo
    Omar Khayyam wrote some extraordinarily beautiful poetry way back in the 12th century. His Rubaiyat can be said to be Philosophy structured in a song.What were the themes in the Rubaiyat-Hedonism? or Agnosticism ? or Theism ? Some examples will indicate what I mean. Two first stanzas apply particularly to RHP Spirituality Forum.
    Firstly:
    Myself when yo e talk awhile of me and thee
    there was --- and then no more of thee and me
    Comments please.
    One of the first and most accessible philosophically-themed works (if not philosophy per se) that I discovered.

    The following is relevant:

    #49

    But helpless pieces in the game He plays
    Upon this chequer-board of Nights and Days
    He hither and thither moves, and checks ... and slays
    Then one by one, back in the Closet lays

    A different edition has it:

    'Tis all a Chequer-board of Nights and Days
    Where Destiny with Men for Pieces plays:
    Hither and thither moves, and mates, and slays,
    And one by one back in the Closet lays.

    Here is a nice illustrated first version with a preface on Khayyam:

    http://www.archive.org/stream/TheRubaiyatOfOmarKhayyam-FirstVersion-Illustrated#page/n0/mode/2up

    Of course the Edward Fitzgerald versions and most likely all others, are not literal translations.
  3. Standard memberrvsakhadeo
    rvsakhadeo
    India
    Joined
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    28 Sep '11 05:35
    Originally posted by JS357
    One of the first and most accessible philosophically-themed works (if not philosophy per se) that I discovered.

    The following is relevant:

    #49

    But helpless pieces in the game He plays
    Upon this chequer-board of Nights and Days
    He hither and thither moves, and checks ... and slays
    Then one by one, back in the Closet lays

    A different edition has ...[text shortened]... course the Edward Fitzgerald versions and most likely all others, are not literal translations.
    Accessible philosophy can form a thread by itself.
    I want to quote Walt Whitman here. An agnostic and pessimistic quote.
    " Logic and sermons never convince; The damp of the night drives deeper into my soul...Now I re-examine philosophies and religions. They may prove well in lecture rooms,
    yet not prove at all under the spacious clouds, and along the landscape and flowing currents. " Omar's disenchantment with philosophies is appearing to me as more robust. More of that later.