1. Houston, Texas
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    07 Feb '13 12:48
    Does anyone here attend a Unitarian Church?
  2. Joined
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    07 Feb '13 19:30
    Originally posted by moon1969
    Does anyone here attend a Unitarian Church?
    Doesn't look likely, but why do you ask?
  3. Houston, Texas
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    07 Feb '13 23:38
    Originally posted by divegeester
    Doesn't look likely, but why do you ask?
    I have cross paths with Untiarians, and was thinking about attending a service. It's not overly convenient but have been thinking about it. Also, possibly taking my kids. I had a good friend who attended a Unitarian church and liked it.
  4. Dublin Ireland
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    08 Feb '13 00:40
    Originally posted by moon1969
    I have cross paths with Untiarians, and was thinking about attending a service. It's not overly convenient but have been thinking about it. Also, possibly taking my kids. I had a good friend who attended a Unitarian church and liked it.
    Well it will fit in with your name anyway.




    MOOOOOOOOOONIE 69
  5. Standard memberhakima
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    08 Feb '13 02:42
    Originally posted by johnnylongwoody
    Well it will fit in with your name anyway.




    MOOOOOOOOOONIE 69
    I used to get the the Unitarians and the Unifications mixed up all the time...until one day I attended a church service of one type and bought a silk rose from another.
  6. Houston, Texas
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    08 Feb '13 03:56
    I helped defend a women's clinic in Baton Rouge in the early 90's from Operation Rescue and the Lambs of God who were storming the clinic. Members of a Unitarian congregation from Arkansas drove down to help defend.
  7. Standard memberhakima
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    08 Feb '13 04:06
    The Unitarian services I attended were in Salt Lake City. I used to attend Contra dances there on Saturday nights and liked what I saw on their marquee...So I attended services there. I liked the music and sitting near a window where the sun lent it's beams on me. 😀
  8. Joined
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    08 Feb '13 06:39
    Originally posted by moon1969
    I have cross paths with Untiarians, and was thinking about attending a service. It's not overly convenient but have been thinking about it. Also, possibly taking my kids. I had a good friend who attended a Unitarian church and liked it.
    I thought you were atheist.

    Is this the group?

    http://www.unitarian.org.uk/intro/believe1.shtml
  9. Houston, Texas
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    09 Feb '13 03:31
    Originally posted by divegeester
    I thought you were atheist.

    Is this the group?

    http://www.unitarian.org.uk/intro/believe1.shtml
    There are many atheists (including my friend) who are members of a Unitarian church.

    Yes that is it.
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    09 Feb '13 03:38
    Originally posted by moon1969
    There are many atheists (including my friend) who are members of a Unitarian church.

    Yes that is it.
    There are many paths to No God.
  11. Houston, Texas
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    09 Feb '13 03:59
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    There are many paths to No God.
    Good one
  12. Standard membersonshiponline
    the corrected one.
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    09 Feb '13 04:01
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    There are many paths to No God.
    No one will remain an atheist forever.
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    09 Feb '13 04:37
    Originally posted by moon1969
    There are many atheists (including my friend) who are members of a Unitarian church.
    The website explains that Unitarianism is a theology which has a faith, it says they want to meet the spiritual needs of the individual, that they are seeking god and have a worship cycle built around the major Christian festivals. Why would atheists be interested?
  14. Houston, Texas
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    09 Feb '13 06:04
    Originally posted by divegeester
    The website explains that Unitarianism is a theology which has a faith, it says they want to meet the spiritual needs of the individual, that they are seeking god and have a worship cycle built around the major Christian festivals. Why would atheists be interested?
    Atheism and Agnosticism: Part of the Theological Diversity Within Unitarian Universalism

    Atheists may be called or call themselves "non-believers," meaning they do not believe in the existence of a supernatural deity or god. Many people who call themselves Agnostic believe they cannot know for sure whether God exists, and some believe that no one can know this for sure. Some are interested in knowing; others, like many Unitarian Universalists, are comfortable without knowing.

    Atheists, Agnostics, and Unitarian Universalists

    Atheists and Agnostics are welcome in Unitarian Universalism and can find a welcoming, supportive faith community in our congregations. Although both groups are often defined by what they do not believe, the reality is that they do believe in a great many things, including many beliefs affirmed within Unitarian Universalism. They believe, for example, that we as humans are responsible for our own actions, that the here and now is important, and that it is good to try to make this world a better place.

    While Unitarian Universalists may share many beliefs in common with many Atheists and Agnostics, we do not have to. As a non-creedal faith, Unitarian Universalism honors the differing spiritual paths we each travel. Our congregations are places where we celebrate, support, and challenge one another as we continue on these journeys. For this reason, many interfaith families—and this increasingly includes those with members who are Atheist or Agnostic—find Unitarian Universalism can uniquely meet their spiritual needs.

    Additionally, the goal of Unitarian Universalist religious education is to equip children and adults to seek out their own truths in a context that honors the underlying values, beliefs, and ethics found in all religious traditions. For this reason, many Atheist and Agnostic parents find a home in Unitarian Universalism when their children begin asking spiritual questions, encounter questions from schoolmates about their lack of belief in God, or wish to explore more theistic religious traditions.


    http://www.uua.org/beliefs/welcome/atheism/index.shtml
  15. Houston, Texas
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    09 Feb '13 06:161 edit
    Originally posted by divegeester
    The website explains that Unitarianism is a theology which has a faith, it says they want to meet the spiritual needs of the individual, that they are seeking god and have a worship cycle built around the major Christian festivals. Why would atheists be interested?
    I have heard they talk in church a lot about being a good citizen in a democracy, and voting, etc., and they contemplate what can they take positive (aspects) from the various religions. Thus, it might not be good if you just hate all aspects of all religions. I don't know.

    Unitarian Universalism is a theologically liberal religion characterized by support for a "free and responsible search for truth and meaning". Unitarian Universalists do not share a creed; rather, they are unified by their shared search for spiritual growth and by the understanding that an individual's theology is a result of that search and not obedience to an authoritarian requirement. Unitarian Universalists draw on many different theological sources and have a wide range of beliefs and practices.

    Contemporary Unitarian Universalism espouses a pluralist approach to religious belief, whereby members may describe themselves as humanist, agnostic, deist, atheist, pagan, christian, monotheist, pantheist, polytheist, or assume no label at all. As of 2006, fewer than about 20% of Unitarian Universalists identified themselves as Christian.

    Beliefs
    There is no single unifying belief that all Unitarian Universalists (UUs) hold, aside from complete and responsible freedom of speech, thought, belief, faith, and disposition. Unitarian Universalists believe that each person is free to search for his or her own personal truth on issues, such as the existence, nature, and meaning of life, deities, creation, and afterlife. UUs can come from any religious background, and hold beliefs and adhere to morals from a variety of cultures or religions.

    Concepts about deity are diverse among UUs. Some are monotheistic. Some have no belief in any gods (atheism); others believe in many gods (polytheism). Some believe that the question of the existence of any god is most likely unascertainable or unknowable (agnosticism). Some believe that God is a metaphor for a transcendent reality. Some believe in a female god (goddess), an Abrahamic god, or a god identified with nature or the universe (pantheism). Still others may hold with the Deist notion that a creator God exists, but does not intervene in the world or reveal itself, and can only be apprehended (if at all) through the use of reason. Many UUs reject the idea of deities and instead speak of the "spirit of life" that binds all life on earth. UUs support each person's search for truth and meaning in concepts of spirituality

    Seven Principles and Purposes
    Deliberately without an official creed or dogma (per the principle of freedom of thought), many Unitarian Universalists make use of the Principles and Purposes as a definition of what UUs believe. These "Principles and Purposes" are taken from the by-laws which govern the Unitarian Universalist Association. While these were written to govern congregations, not individuals, many UUs use them as guides for living their faith. The "Seven Principles" were created in committee and affirmed democratically by a vote of member congregations at an annual General Assembly (a meeting of delegates from member congregations). Adopted in 1960, the full Principles, Purposes and Sources can be found in the article on the Unitarian Universalist Association. The Principles are as follows:

    We, the member congregations of the Unitarian Universalist Association, covenant to affirm and promote

    The inherent worth and dignity of every person;

    Justice, equity and compassion in human relations;

    Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our
    congregations;

    A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;

    The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large;

    The goal of world community with peace, liberty and justice for all;

    Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unitarian_Universalism
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