1. Joined
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    21 Apr '12 11:59
    free of charge

    http://www.southparkstudios.com/clips/104274/what-scientologist-actually-believe
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    21 Apr '12 17:29
    Originally posted by tim88
    free of charge

    http://www.southparkstudios.com/clips/104274/what-scientologist-actually-believe
    yeah, almost as silly as the belief that a god incarnated himself in a man, then had himself tortured and killed to appease his own wrath.
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    21 Apr '12 19:48
    Originally posted by tim88
    free of charge

    http://www.southparkstudios.com/clips/104274/what-scientologist-actually-believe
    ummm i have read Hubbards book, i dont remember any of that to be honest, it was
    more psychological than extra terrestrial.
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    21 Apr '12 19:50
    Originally posted by VoidSpirit
    yeah, almost as silly as the belief that a god incarnated himself in a man, then had himself tortured and killed to appease his own wrath.
    Another fallacy, the ransom sacrifice of Christ was utilized not to appease Gods wrath
    but to propitiate for what Adam had lost.
  5. Joined
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    22 Apr '12 04:56
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    ummm i have read Hubbards book, i dont remember any of that to be honest, it was
    more psychological than extra terrestrial.
    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080308152808AAIi4Ah
  6. SubscriberAThousandYoung
    West Coast Rioter
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    22 Apr '12 05:48
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    ummm i have read Hubbards book, i dont remember any of that to be honest, it was
    more psychological than extra terrestrial.
    Dienetics is only one of many Hubbard books.
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    22 Apr '12 07:09
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Dienetics is only one of many Hubbard books.
    ok, i was unaware, but does this not form the basis of the Scientology ethos?
  8. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    22 Apr '12 07:14
    Originally posted by tim88
    free of charge

    http://www.southparkstudios.com/clips/104274/what-scientologist-actually-believe
    Do you get all your spiritual advice from SouthParkStudios?
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    22 Apr '12 07:16
    Originally posted by tim88
    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080308152808AAIi4Ah
    actually there are conflicting points of view presented there.
  10. Joined
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    22 Apr '12 07:451 edit
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    Do you get all your spiritual advice from SouthParkStudios?
    look we have a scientologist

    not that there's anything wrong with that
  11. Joined
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    22 Apr '12 07:562 edits
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    actually there are conflicting points of view presented there.
    only the advanced members that pays lots of money gets to know the full story-that person obviously doesn't have enough money
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenu

    The story of Xenu is covered in OT III, part of Scientology's secret "Advanced Technology" doctrines taught only to advanced members who have undergone many expensive hours of auditing and reached the state of Clear.[7][12] It is described in more detail in the accompanying confidential "Assists" lecture of October 3, 1968 and is dramatized in Revolt in the Stars (a screenplay written by L. Ron Hubbard in 1977).[7][22]

    Hubbard wrote that Xenu was the ruler of a Galactic Confederacy 75 million years ago, which consisted of 26 stars and 76 planets including Earth, which was then known as "Teegeeack".[5][8][23] The planets were overpopulated, with an average population of 178 billion.[1][4][6] The Galactic Confederacy's civilization was comparable to our own, with aliens "walking around in clothes which looked very remarkably like the clothes they wear this very minute" and using cars, trains and boats looking exactly the same as those "circa 1950, 1960" on Earth.[24]

    Xenu was about to be deposed from power, so he devised a plot to eliminate the excess population from his dominions. With the assistance of psychiatrists, he summoned billions[4][5] of his citizens together under the pretense of income tax inspections, then paralyzed them and froze them in a mixture of alcohol and glycol to capture their souls. The kidnapped populace was loaded into spacecraft for transport to the site of extermination, the planet of Teegeeack (Earth).[5] The appearance of these spacecraft would later be subconsciously expressed in the design of the Douglas DC-8, the only difference being: "the DC8 had fans, propellers on it and the space plane didn't".[21] When they had reached Teegeeack/Earth, the paralyzed citizens were unloaded around the bases of volcanoes across the planet.[5][8] Hydrogen bombs were then lowered into the volcanoes and detonated simultaneously.[8] Only a few aliens' physical bodies survived. Hubbard described the scene in his film script, Revolt in the Stars:
  12. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    22 Apr '12 14:11
    Originally posted by tim88
    only the advanced members that pays lots of money gets to know the full story-that person obviously doesn't have enough money
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenu

    The story of Xenu is covered in OT III, part of Scientology's secret "Advanced Technology" doctrines taught on ...[text shortened]... survived. Hubbard described the scene in his film script, Revolt in the Stars:
    If people can be duped into believing their god made a virgin pregnant and then later the kid died came back three days later only to ascend in to heaven, and Islamic terrorists can buy into the idea they will be given 73 virgins after they blow themselves up then it is absolutely not surprising people can be duped into believing that Hubbard crap AND spend a hundred thou in the bargain. Great news for Hubbard though. Of course he did have that little problem with the IRS and decided to make Scientology headquarters on a boat, where he just happened to develop as a boat lover, living in international waters and money in foreign banks where the IRS couldn't get at it but what the hey, its no more stupid a religion than any of the others on Earth, all made possible by the creativity of men.

    One thing about scientology, if you got the hundred thou to blow on them they don't care if you are male, female, black, white, asian, or a great ape, they will make you all OT's.

    One problem for scientology right now is in Australia the Aussie government is looking very closely at two deals in scientology: one, the pay the workers get, about 50 bucks a week, doesn't jive with the minimum pay scale in Australia, which is over ten times that. Scientology responds with the concept the workers, the ones who administer the classes, are 'volunteers'. They may lose that one and end up having to pay minimum wage in Australia and then like domino's, the same in Europe, and other places. It may break the scientology bank.

    The other deal is the status of scientology as a religious organization with the tax free status. That is also under review in Australia.

    All of the above may make scientology a thing of the past.

    Not soon enough for me. I know L Ron Hubbard is nut job from personal experience.

    I was briefly, VERY briefly, involved with scientology early on and the managers made the mistake of inviting me into their upper tier offices and I was able to peruse what they called RonGrams, something like that. Anyway what it was was a series of notes from L Ron about what to do with certain problems.

    One of those problems was the scientology version of apostasy, those who left and were bad mouthing scientology in general.

    I saw the beginnings of the harassment of those people in legal battles under the direction of L Ron Hubbard.

    One of the RonGrams that stood out to me was what to do with these traitors:

    I quote, this directly from L Ron Hubbard himself: "There is always the 45 solution" and it wasn't a joke. Since the uppers at scientology viewed L Ron as nearly a god, whatever he said was to be taken seriously.

    That was enough for me, they never saw me again. That was in 1968.
  13. Joined
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    22 Apr '12 14:25
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    If people can be duped into believing their god made a virgin pregnant and then later the kid died came back three days later only to ascend in to heaven, and Islamic terrorists can buy into the idea they will be given 73 virgins after they blow themselves up then it is absolutely not surprising people can be duped into believing that Hubbard crap AND spend ...[text shortened]... aken seriously.

    That was enough for me, they never saw me again. That was in 1968.
    jesus loves you sonhouse! and probably the only one that read all that
  14. Joined
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    22 Apr '12 14:27
    Where's RJ
  15. SubscriberSuzianne
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    22 Apr '12 15:40
    Originally posted by tim88
    only the advanced members that pays lots of money gets to know the full story-that person obviously doesn't have enough money
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenu

    The story of Xenu is covered in OT III, part of Scientology's secret "Advanced Technology" doctrines taught on ...[text shortened]... survived. Hubbard described the scene in his film script, Revolt in the Stars:
    This makes total sense if you happen to know two crucial facts:

    1. Hubbard created Scientology for one purpose, and one purpose only. As a tax shelter.

    2. Hubbard wrote many science fiction stories, including the 10-part horrendously long and boring "Battlefield Earth: A Saga of the Year 3000", that was made into what is possibly the worst movie ever made.
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