1. Donationkirksey957
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    02 Jun '07 10:32
    From time to time I will see someone write in the forum either "why does God need to be worshiped" or "worship is boring" or something in that vein. I can commiserate. It is rare that I experience worship as invigorating and giving me something other wordly. Last night was one of them.

    I went to visit a pastor friend of mine who lost his son in a fire. He invited me to a new Friday night contemporary service. I tend to not like "contemporary" worship as I find it shallow. HOwever, I was deeply moved by this pastor's honesty in the face of his loss. HE said, "I 'll let you in on a secret. Sometimes preachers talk and have no idea what in the world they are saying." Anyway , the congregation was half white, half black, about 1/3 homeless, about 1/3 addicted and trying to recover. Some of the music was as "high church" as you would hear in any large cathedral. Some of it was praise music that played on guitars and was actually really neat. I was deeply moved by the outpouring of love for this pastor from the homeless and addicted in their spontaneous expressions during the service. They cried for him, embraced him, and broke bread with him." It was a beuatiful thing to see.
  2. Joined
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    02 Jun '07 15:00
    Originally posted by kirksey957
    From time to time I will see someone write in the forum either "why does God need to be worshiped" or "worship is boring" or something in that vein. I can commiserate. It is rare that I experience worship as invigorating and giving me something other wordly. Last night was one of them.

    I went to visit a pastor friend of mine who lost his son in a f ...[text shortened]... for him, embraced him, and broke bread with him." It was a beuatiful thing to see.
    I believe that that is what fellowship is about. Sharing one anothers' burdens.
    It seems to me I encounter folks in church with problems they cause for themselves. It's hard to feel sorry for them when their "problem" is self inflicted.
    It's encouraging, when tragedy occurs, to have trusted family and friends come to your side and give you strength.
  3. Donationkirksey957
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    02 Jun '07 15:02
    Originally posted by josephw
    I believe that that is what fellowship is about. Sharing one anothers' burdens.
    It seems to me I encounter folks in church with problems they cause for themselves. It's hard to feel sorry for them when their "problem" is self inflicted.
    It's encouraging, when tragedy occurs, to have trusted family and friends come to your side and give you strength.
    As I said about 1/3 of the people there had problems that were self-inflicted. When did the Gospel stop with them?
  4. Joined
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    02 Jun '07 15:52
    Originally posted by kirksey957
    As I said about 1/3 of the people there had problems that were self-inflicted. When did the Gospel stop with them?
    I'm not sure what you mean by "when did the gospel stop with them".

    I'm not saying that just because their problems are self inflicted that we don't have compassion for them. I was speaking mainly to the issue of sharing a burden someone has because of life's inevitable tragedies.
  5. RDU NC
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    03 Jun '07 22:54
    Originally posted by josephw
    I'm not sure what you mean by "when did the gospel stop with them".

    I'm not saying that just because their problems are self inflicted that we don't have compassion for them. I was speaking mainly to the issue of sharing a burden someone has because of life's inevitable tragedies.
    Doesn't Galatians tell the Christian to come along side a brother who has sinned in order to restore him? Sin is a self-inflicted tragedy in a believers life. Therefore it would seem that sharing the burden IS the goal of the church whether it is self-inflicted tragedy or not.
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    04 Jun '07 02:02
    Originally posted by Big Mac
    Doesn't Galatians tell the Christian to come along side a brother who has sinned in order to restore him? Sin is a self-inflicted tragedy in a believers life. Therefore it would seem that sharing the burden IS the goal of the church whether it is self-inflicted tragedy or not.
    Of course that all depends. What if the "brother" in question isn't willing to receive counsel?
  7. RDU NC
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    04 Jun '07 02:54
    Originally posted by josephw
    Of course that all depends. What if the "brother" in question isn't willing to receive counsel?
    Then according to Matthew 18, there is a process to follow, each step of which would be coming along side the "brother" and encouraging repentance. Only the last step says to consider him an unbeliever. However, this does not mean to cease associating with him altogether, but rather to then proceed with evangelism. So, while you may not take the Lord's table together, you are to come along side him in his troubles in order to display love that may win your "brother."

    I see no Biblically supported mandate for leaving ANY man alone in his sin or tragedy, sin being a smaller subset of the larger: tragedy. Aren't Christian organizations that minister to convicts, prostitutes, and the like doing a good thing? The ultimate goal is to win a "brother," or "sister" in the case the latter.
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