1. Standard membersasquatch672
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    25 Nov '12 07:092 edits
    The acts were unspeakable. That's so far beyond dispute it shouldn't need to be said.

    I'm sure that this has been discussed, but I missed it. Why does a private organization have the right to fine a government entity? If the NCAA can fine a member that is a publicly funded university - heavily, and through an extrajudicial process - for the misconduct of its officials, where does its power stop? Aren't they effectively fining the state government? After all, what's to stop a state legislator from throwing $60 million in Penn State's line item?
  2. Joined
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    25 Nov '12 15:251 edit
    Originally posted by sasquatch672
    The acts were unspeakable. That's so far beyond dispute it shouldn't need to be said.

    I'm sure that this has been discussed, but I missed it. Why does a private organization have the right to fine a government entity? If the NCAA can fine a member that is a publicly funded university - heavily, and through an extrajudicial process - for the misc ll, what's to stop a state legislator from throwing $60 million in Penn State's line item?
    I kind of like the idea. Now if we can just find a way to impose taxes on politicians in Washington all will be well with the world.

    Oh, I forgot, they don't pay taxes. My bad. 😳
  3. Subscriberno1marauder
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    25 Nov '12 16:59
    Originally posted by sasquatch672
    The acts were unspeakable. That's so far beyond dispute it shouldn't need to be said.

    I'm sure that this has been discussed, but I missed it. Why does a private organization have the right to fine a government entity? If the NCAA can fine a member that is a publicly funded university - heavily, and through an extrajudicial process - for the misc ...[text shortened]... ll, what's to stop a state legislator from throwing $60 million in Penn State's line item?
    Penn State is a voluntary member of the NCAA. If they don't like its rules, they can leave (it's not "perpetual" and "inviolable" like the US).
  4. Standard membersasquatch672
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    25 Nov '12 21:21
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Penn State is a voluntary member of the NCAA. If they don't like its rules, they can leave (it's not "perpetual" and "inviolable" like the US).
    Yeah, ok...I can buy that. I don't feel strongly about it, especially in light of the circumstances.
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