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  1. Standard member asromacalcio
    asromacalcio
    19 Aug '08 21:39
    Since when has the word 'medal' been a verb?

    OK, I know we in GB have had a lot more practice talking about them recently, but this is no reason to ignore the conventions of grammar.

    It is very annoying.
  2. Standard member RevRSleeker
    CerebrallyChallenged
    20 Aug '08 19:43
    Originally posted by asromacalcio
    Since when has the word 'medal' been a verb?

    OK, I know we in GB have had a lot more practice talking about them recently, but this is no reason to ignore the conventions of grammar.

    It is very annoying.


    just idle thoughts...'conventions of grammar' went out of the window, quite openly, many years ago in my opinion. Our commonwealth friend ...[text shortened]... le levels'...quite who considers these levels as being appropriate is another thing entirely.
  3. Standard member RevRSleeker
    CerebrallyChallenged
    20 Aug '08 19:46
    Apoliges, the whole message thus.

    just idle thoughts...'conventions of grammar' went out of the window, quite openly, many years ago in my opinion. Our commonwealth friends, expecially Indians, correct usage is plainly leagues ahead. Personally I believe it's down to what we consider 'acceptable levels'...quite who considers these levels as being appropriate is another thing entirely.
  4. Standard member asromacalcio
    asromacalcio
    20 Aug '08 20:11
    English will evolve into a simplified version one day anyway, I don't think it will serve anybody to hasten the transition.
  5. Standard member RevRSleeker
    CerebrallyChallenged
    20 Aug '08 23:16
    Originally posted by asromacalcio
    English will evolve into a simplified version one day anyway, I don't think it will serve anybody to hasten the transition.
    I'd say 'sms speak' has rapidly created another form of written English...to those with a good grasp of written English, yet not a first language, it is hardly legible for the most part. Personally I've spent minutes trying to work out certain words and phrases posted on all manner of websites.
  6. 21 Aug '08 12:57 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by asromacalcio
    Since when has the word 'medal' been a verb?

    OK, I know we in GB have had a lot more practice talking about them recently, but this is no reason to ignore the conventions of grammar.

    It is very annoying.
    The word medal itself is not a verb. It is a noun. However the word MEDALED is a verb.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/medal
  7. Standard member asromacalcio
    asromacalcio
    21 Aug '08 13:19
    I hate SMS speak, I try to be fair and not a bigoted dinosaur, but it saddens me to see how prevalent it's become.

    But I was referring more to the moves to establish a simplified and simple international English, for example including no third person S, no past simple form and no TH sounds, no uncountable nouns (so we can say advices and informations) and a few other unthinkable abominations of dialect.

    But this belongs in another forum...
  8. Standard member asromacalcio
    asromacalcio
    21 Aug '08 13:20
    Originally posted by JohnLennonForever
    The word medal itself is not a verb. It is a noun. However the word MEDALED is a verb.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/medal
    Ah well, seems I spoke too soon, although I don't change my plea!

    Annoyed as charged!!!
  9. 21 Aug '08 13:22 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by asromacalcio
    Ah well, seems I spoke too soon, although I don't change my plea!

    Annoyed as charged!!!
    So what exactly are you annoyed at if medaled is a verb? Never in Olympics have I heard someone say that such and such athlete medal. I've heard them say that such and such athlete has medaled or that such and such athlete has won a medal.
  10. Standard member asromacalcio
    asromacalcio
    21 Aug '08 16:53 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by JohnLennonForever
    So what exactly are you annoyed at if medaled is a verb? Never in Olympics have I heard someone say that such and such athlete medal. I've heard them say that such and such athlete has medaled or that such and such athlete has won a medal.
    Well first question, I don't know, it's just that distorted 'convenience' use of the language annoys me, linguistic fast food. I'm a pedant, puritan, perfectionist, it's just personal bigotry, no more.

    But there have been more direct examples of my point, for example Gaby Yorath (married name escapes me now) asking the silver medal winning high jumper if he thought he could medal in the high jump.

    The past simple and past participle, medalled, can only exist if the word is a verb. Nouns don't have past forms. So if we say 'medalled' it is the past of 'to medal', a verb, incorrectly, IMHO.
  11. 22 Aug '08 03:29
    Originally posted by asromacalcio
    Well first question, I don't know, it's just that distorted 'convenience' use of the language annoys me, linguistic fast food. I'm a pedant, puritan, perfectionist, it's just personal bigotry, no more.

    But there have been more direct examples of my point, for example Gaby Yorath (married name escapes me now) asking the silver medal winning high jumpe ...[text shortened]... rms. So if we say 'medalled' it is the past of 'to medal', a verb, incorrectly, IMHO.
    I personally feel the word medal can actually be used as a noun or verb. And the reason why is if you are asking a question that changes grammar rules. For example, medal is a noun if used like this. The gold U.S.A. has won gold medal. But things change if used in a question. Do you think the U.S.A. can medal? In this instance medal is in fact a verb where the noun is U.S.A. And as for medaled, it is a word and actually an intransitive verb. For further proof here is the link to the Webster's online dictionary which I am sure is sufficient enough.

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/medaled