Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Sports Forum

Sports Forum

  1. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    24 Feb '09 21:35 / 1 edit
    How can this guy be wasting away on the Oilers farm team while the team can't ascore goals??!!??

    McTavish says the guy is too soft for his type of team. Give me a break. He'd rather have tough guys that can't score, than have a guy that can light it up. He sounds like frickin Cherry.

    Schrempf played 4 games, got 3 points and was a plus 2. Not good enough says MacT. Your team is out of the playoffs. Time to go buddy.
  2. 26 Feb '09 13:56
    Originally posted by uzless
    How can this guy be wasting away on the Oilers farm team while the team can't ascore goals??!!??

    McTavish says the guy is too soft for his type of team. Give me a break. He'd rather have tough guys that can't score, than have a guy that can light it up. He sounds like frickin Cherry.

    Schrempf played 4 games, got 3 points and was a plus 2. Not good enough says MacT. Your team is out of the playoffs. Time to go buddy.
    I don't get it either. The guy should be ready by now. Look at the names in the 2004 draft and almost all the first rounders are up in the bigs, making names for themselves already:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_NHL_Entry_Draft
  3. 26 Feb '09 17:44
    is alan eagleson still alive?

    i was reading about him

    "until 1989 he was considered a national hero in Canada and an icon in the NHL"

    really?
  4. 26 Feb '09 18:41
    Originally posted by trev33
    is alan eagleson still alive?

    i was reading about him

    "until 1989 he was considered a national hero in Canada and an icon in the NHL"

    really?
    He was an extremely powerful man in hockey. Canadian Hero might be a stretch but there's no doubt he was an NHL icon. He was the first Director of the NHLPA, organized the Canada Cup and was an integral part of the 1972 Summit Series which remains a very important piece of Canadian Hockey folklore. He was also awarded an Order of Canada in the late eighties. All that has crumbled though and he ended up spending a good portion of his later years in jail. He is still alive but he is completely out of the limelight.
  5. 26 Feb '09 19:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by darvlay
    He was an extremely powerful man in hockey. Canadian Hero might be a stretch but there's no doubt he was an NHL icon. He was the first Director of the NHLPA, organized the Canada Cup and was an integral part of the 1972 Summit Series which remains a very important piece of Canadian Hockey folklore. He was also awarded an Order of Canada in the late eighti ...[text shortened]... rtion of his later years in jail. He is still alive but he is completely out of the limelight.
    i read he was in jail for 6 months after being given an 18 month sentence.

    did he get the money he swindled taken off him or is he sitting in a mansion somewhere?
  6. 26 Feb '09 19:43
    Originally posted by trev33
    i read he was in jail for 6 months after being given an 18 month sentence.

    did he get the money he swindled taken off him or is he sitting in a mansion somewhere?
    Only 6 months, eh? To be honest, I don't know much about the scams he was pulling. Maybe Uzless will though...
  7. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    27 Feb '09 19:02 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by darvlay
    Only 6 months, eh? To be honest, I don't know much about the scams he was pulling. Maybe Uzless will though...
    He bilked the players union out of a tonne of cash. There are many former players who ended up with didly squat because of him.




    The series alleged that Eagleson had embezzled player pension funds for many years, principally from the 1972 Summit Series. He was also accused of colluding with teams whose management he favoured, such as the Chicago Blackhawks, to hold down salaries, even if it meant working contrary to the interests of his clients. For example, after Orr's contract with Boston ran out, Eagleson told Bobby Orr that the Blackhawks had a deal on the table that Orr couldn't refuse. It later emerged that the Bruins offered Orr one of the most lucrative contracts in sports history, including an 18 percent stake in the team; however, Eagleson falsely claimed the Blackhawks had a better offer. Wirtz was never charged with wrongdoing, largely because the Bruins' offer was widely known in league circles, and even reported in the Toronto Star. No other NHL owner was ever charged in the affair. Orr was once one of Eagleson's strongest supporters, but later denounced him after suspecting that he was being cheated. Orr, whose career ended in 1978 because of serious knee injuries, learned he was almost bankrupt, despite having earned high salaries while being represented by Eagleson.

    However, the series' most shocking revelation concerned Eagleson's actions regarding disability claims by former players. Eagleson was accused of taking large payments from insurance claims before the players filing them received their share, telling the players that he earned the "fee" while fighting against the insurance companies to get the claims paid. In fact, many players later learned that the insurance companies had already agreed to pay the claims and there was no "fight". In other cases where a "fight" with the insurance companies truly was required, several players ran into bureaucratic dead ends and no support from Eagleson while they tried to move forward on insurance and pension claims to support their families. Conway later turned his series into the basis of a book, Game Misconduct: Alan Eagleson and the Corruption of Hockey.

    Conway published several other stories over the next nine years about Eagleson's crimes. For instance, he'd been reimbursed more than $62,000 for personal expenses from 1987 to 1989. He also revealed that the NHLPA had unknowingly footed the bill for expensive clothing, theater tickets and a luxury apartment in London. Many players had been led to believe that they were playing in the Canada Cup for free because all the money was going to their pensions. Eagleson had also refused to visit the family of a second-line defenceman, Ed Kea, whose career was ended by a devastating head injury that required major brain surgery.

    Conway worked very closely with Carl Brewer, one of Eagleson's early clients. Brewer had by this time had become the leader of a group of former players who felt Eagleson had lied to them. Brewer's longtime companion, Susan Foster, provided a large amount of material to Conway.

    Although Eagleson had been based in Toronto, most Canadian media organizations had avoided detailed investigation of his dealings until Conway's material was published. That changed when The Globe and Mail began its own examination of Eagleson's career in early 1993, and published a series of stories with further revelations. Two Globe sports writers, William Houston and David Shoalts, expanded that material, Conway's work, and the latest developments into their own book, entitled Eagleson: The Fall of a Hockey Czar, which was published later in 1993.


    [edit] Charged by RCMP, extradited to U.S.
    In 1996, after a politically delayed three-year investigation, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police finally was forced, by Conway's publications, to charge Eagleson with eight counts of fraud and theft. He'd already been charged with 34 counts of racketeering, obstruction of justice, embezzlement and fraud in the United States in 1994. However, he still had enough political clout from his days as an MPP and a power broker with the Tories that he was able to fight off extradition to the United States until 1997.

    On January 6, 1998, Eagleson pleaded guilty to three counts of mail fraud in Boston, and was fined $700,000. Later that year, he pleaded guilty in Toronto to three more counts of fraud and embezzling hundreds of thousands of dollars of Canada Cup proceeds in 1984, 1987 and 1991.



    From wiki