1. Joined
    06 Aug '11
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    3103
    07 Jan '13 05:16
    Man, are they exciting to watch. We got RGIII, this kid on the Seahawks, Copernicus on the Niners. They really make for exciting play. But lets face it, a blow to the head here, the slap on the knee there, and the next thing you know, mediocrity. Randall Cunningham. Slash with Blitzburgh. Vick. I am sure I am forgetting quite a few. I have been watching the sports shows for a few days and they are saying this is the new NFL, the new way of the QB. Just seems to me these guys have the lifespan of a firefly. Steve Young may be one of the few fast and mobile QB's who went all the way, but he had a pile of concussions along the way. Now how about those pocket passers? The Mannings, Brady. Quite a few rings between them all.and they are all fairly slow. I think Eli may have a little zip but not to be considered a "dual threat" QB. These guys are going to have longevity though, I still think a QB that has the ability to make a quick decision, surrounded by about 1500 pounds of meat, is going to have a much longer career, and a on average a more productive season, than the guys who cut and run. No matter how fast and strong these young QBs seem to be, the guys hitting them on average are a whole lot stronger. Not saying that Rusty or Copernicus or RGIII wont get a ring, but long after these guys are no longer significant guys like Andrew Luck will still be around and doing fine.
  2. Joined
    01 Apr '09
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    26584
    07 Jan '13 16:03
    A lot of the QB running starts when he doesn't see the initial pass pattern unfold. Big QB's who got away with running in college tend to then take off laterally, thinking they will either keep running, or throw a sideline pass. But this means the receivers have to go to plan B, which usually puts them all running to the sideline. Over time, the passing game becomes ragged and the QB is hurt. The most successful pro QB's might step away from a collapsing pocket, but they are still looking for the initial pass pattern.
    It just works better in the long run to use the talent of the whole team.
  3. Joined
    09 Nov '12
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    1810
    07 Jan '13 17:24
    Don't forget the original, Fran Tarkenton, who played 18 seasons and, of course, lost in 3 Superbowls.
  4. Joined
    14 Dec '07
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    3763
    07 Jan '13 18:31
    Warren Moon had good longevity. I wonder, with the rules changing to protect players from concussions, if we will see a more CFL like NFL in the future. In the CFL, a running quarterback can have excellent longevity. Like Damon Allen
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damon_Allen
  5. Joined
    06 Aug '11
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    3103
    07 Jan '13 18:41
    Originally posted by dryhump
    Warren Moon had good longevity. I wonder, with the rules changing to protect players from concussions, if we will see a more CFL like NFL in the future. In the CFL, a running quarterback can have excellent longevity. Like Damon Allen
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damon_Allen
    Yes you can protect from concussions but what about knees? Ankles? Hips? Just seems to me the more mobile they are, the more punishing hits they endure.
  6. Joined
    06 Aug '11
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    3103
    07 Jan '13 18:45
    Originally posted by Zamboner
    Don't forget the original, Fran Tarkenton, who played 18 seasons and, of course, lost in 3 Superbowls.
    I dont remember Francis as a power runner though as much as a scrambler, twisting and squirming behind the line, darting side to side to avoid sacks. I dont remember him as a big head on collision running down the field guy. At one point he held the record for the longest play (in time) from scrimmage, I want to say 45 seconds, but it could have been a bit less. Imagine dodging linemen for 45 seconds?
  7. Joined
    14 Dec '07
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    3763
    07 Jan '13 19:14
    Originally posted by mudpie
    Yes you can protect from concussions but what about knees? Ankles? Hips? Just seems to me the more mobile they are, the more punishing hits they endure.
    I agree with you, I'm just wondering if the game is going to change enough to make a running quarterback as viable in the NFL as they are in the CFL. Right now, you're absolutely right, it's hard for a running quarterback to stay healthy.
  8. Joined
    01 Apr '09
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    26584
    11 Jan '13 16:24
    Some of the increase in injuries to QB's is also due to statistics. 20 pass attempts in the 60's was a lot in a game. Now, 50 is the norm. The opportunities to get hit are higher, and the hitters are bigger and stronger.
  9. Joined
    10 May '09
    Moves
    13341
    13 Jan '13 20:19
    Originally posted by mudpie
    Yes you can protect from concussions but what about knees? Ankles? Hips? Just seems to me the more mobile they are, the more punishing hits they endure.
    Potentially, sure.

    But a smart running QB can mitigate those potential injuries. Slide, run out of bounds and don't claw for every inch. Just take what you're given.
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