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Tournaments Forum

  1. Standard member SmittyG
    Chess Player
    04 Aug '03 15:28
    I put this in another thread but thought it might get more notice this way:

    I am in the Rookie Rapid Fire Tournament and have a little problem. The TO for the game is 1 day. Now, I normally play long games and, even with the TO of 7, I don't claim the win until after 30 days. I figure by then, if you weren't on vacation of course, something is preventing you from returning at all. Anyway, my opponent has already TO'd after the first moves. Again, I normally don't give a rat's behind, but I don't know what the ethics are in bogging down a super fast tournament with my relaxed attitude. Any advice on how this is normally handled around here? Thanks.

    --SmittyG
  2. Donation maggoteer
    The MAKIA
    04 Aug '03 16:18 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by SmittyG
    I put this in another thread but thought it might get more notice this way:

    I am in the Rookie Rapid Fire Tournament and have a little problem. The TO for the game is 1 day. Now, I normally play long games and, even with the TO of 7, I d ...[text shortened]... how this is normally handled around here? Thanks.

    --SmittyG
    I'm under the impression the general opinion in tournaments is:
    Take the time out when available.

    Indeed, there was a rumor that Russ/Chris (developers of the site) were making tournament timeouts automatic. I don't know if that's been implemented yet.

    Some reasons:
    1) Tournaments are competitive, and time constraints are an important part of the game.

    2) Not taking them can be a pain for OTHER players, who have to patiently wait months and months for the non-t/o-takers to meander through their games. Given that the second round of a tourney won't start until ALL the games of the first round are done, enforcing t/o rules can ensure a given tournament doesn't grind to a halt because one player abandoned a game and his/her opponent won't take the t/o.

    3) If you don't take a t/o against a given opponent and the rest of the players in your group do, they get "free" wins compared to you and you've got a chance of being knocked out of the tourname even if you are playing better and have more "real" wins.
    Hope that helps.

    mag
  3. Standard member SmittyG
    Chess Player
    04 Aug '03 17:18
    Very sound arguments. That's pretty much was I figured, but I wanted to confirm before I broke a house rule/policy. Thanks for the reply.

    --SmittyG