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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    18 Jun '08 14:01 / 2 edits
    Quote from wikipedia ;

    Adagio in G minor for strings and organ is a piece composed by Remo Giazotto while supposedly based on a fragment from a Sonata in G minor by Tomaso Giovanni Albinoni which was found amongst the ruins of the old Saxon State Library, Dresden, after it was firebombed by the Allies during World War II. The Adagio was first published in 1958.

    The piece was repeatedly used as an underlying score for Orson Welles' adaption of Kafka's "The Trial". The piece has been used most notably in the 1981 Peter Weir film Gallipoli, which was themed around the famous World War I battle of the same name; and in the original version of the film Rollerball (1975). The piece was also used throughout the episode "Dragon's Domain," from the first season of the mid-1970s sci-fi TV series Space: 1999, and later included on the expanded double-CD Year 1 soundtrack released in 1998. The Adagio has been used as background music in many television programmes and advertisements including the popular BBC sitcom, Butterflies and the 1982 anime film Arcadia of My Youth. The Adagio can be heard Steven Galloway's novel, "The Cellist of Sarajevo". Adagio is also used as the introduction on the song, "Icarus Dream Suite Op.4," by Yngwie Malmsteen on his album, Rising Force. It is also used by The Doors on the album An American Prayer.

    It is most commonly orchestrated for string ensemble and organ, or string ensemble alone.

    Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adagio_in_G_minor"




    I never knew that. Is that possible ? I verifed the information from various sources. So that famous Adagio, one of the most known classical pieces of all time is not written by Albinoni ?!


    I am talking about this piece ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mz4dpbk8YBs
  2. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    18 Jun '08 19:23
    Originally posted by ivan2908

    So that famous Adagio, one of the most known classical pieces of all time is not written by Albinoni ?!
    "The Adagio was first published in 1958" ...
  3. Donation kirksey957
    Outkast
    19 Jun '08 21:24
    Originally posted by ivan2908
    Quote from wikipedia ;

    Adagio in G minor for strings and organ is a piece composed by Remo Giazotto while supposedly based on a fragment from a Sonata in G minor by Tomaso Giovanni Albinoni which was found amongst the ruins of the old Saxon State Library, Dresden, after it was firebombed by the Allies during World War II. The Adagio was first published i ...[text shortened]...


    I am talking about this piece ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mz4dpbk8YBs
    I don't believe the real composer was discovered in the past 5 years or so.
  4. 22 Jun '08 05:33
    Originally posted by kirksey957
    I don't believe the real composer was discovered in the past 5 years or so.
    This topic comes up regularly in music discussion programmes. The usual opinion is that the lifelong Albinoni fan who wrote it developed it from the bass part of an Albinoni sonata, so it's sort of a tribute to Albinoni rather than a piece by Albinoni. Wartime destruction of records is a story impossible to prove or disprove.
  5. Standard member ivan2908
    SelfProclaimedTitler
    22 Jun '08 11:52
    Originally posted by MissOleum
    This topic comes up regularly in music discussion programmes. The usual opinion is that the lifelong Albinoni fan who wrote it developed it from the bass part of an Albinoni sonata, so it's sort of a tribute to Albinoni rather than a piece by Albinoni. Wartime destruction of records is a story impossible to prove or disprove.
    Very shocking. I do not know how could I've missed that as a student of music. We never discussed that on the University the Adagio was simple Albinoni Adagio. However, who ever wrote it is a genious