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Culture Forum

  1. Standard member karoly aczel
    Console Peasant
    05 Nov '17 14:49
    So many to choose from. But as a muso I cant go past "Spiderland" by Slint. A band led by an amazing drummer. A lot of harmonics, slow beautiful and loud guitars, alternate timings and drop " D " tunings: this album has put itself up there as the most original re-definition of rock music I've come across since the Velvet Underground . Of course there are many others like My Bloody Valentine's "Loveless " , Tool's "Amnesia" or the relentlessness of Nick Cave's Birthday Party.

    It could be successfully argued that all the above mentioned bands come from the likes of Iggy Pop, Neil Young, Dead Kennedy's and prog rock bands of the 70's like Pink Floyd. However I think in each case these examples have re-created the 'rock' sound so much so that they have made it their own. The success measured in how many these bands inspired to start their own bands, not in record sales.
  2. Standard member caissad4
    Child of the Novelty
    05 Nov '17 18:39 / 2 edits
    Jethro Tull . No band was even close to them in originality.
    Imagine releasing an album (Thick as a Brick) which is a single song and succeeding is almost unimaginable to me.
  3. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    05 Nov '17 19:03
    Originally posted by @caissad4
    Jethro Tull . No band was even close to them in originality.
    Imagine releasing an album (Thick as a Brick) which is a single song and succeeding is almost unimaginable to me.
    Yes, well when he attributed Bach's Bouree to himself, I lost respect for him and his music.

    The record didn't say 'arrangement by Tull' it said Bouree by Jethro Tull. Every aspiring guitar player learns the bouree but NOBODY says they wrote it.
  4. Standard member karoly aczel
    Console Peasant
    05 Nov '17 22:55
    Originally posted by @caissad4
    Jethro Tull . No band was even close to them in originality.
    Imagine releasing an album (Thick as a Brick) which is a single song and succeeding is almost unimaginable to me.
    Good call.
    Anything more obscure or recent?
  5. Standard member caissad4
    Child of the Novelty
    07 Nov '17 16:52
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    Yes, well when he attributed Bach's Bouree to himself, I lost respect for him and his music.
    The record didn't say 'arrangement by Tull' it said Bouree by Jethro Tull. Every aspiring guitar player learns the bouree but NOBODY says they wrote it.
    My 8 track said Bach.
    BtW, Jethro Tull is a them.
  6. Standard member karoly aczel
    Console Peasant
    07 Nov '17 17:02
    Originally posted by @caissad4
    My 8 track said Bach.
    BtW, Jethro Tull is a them.
    Oh? I thought it was like ' Bon Jovi'

    Bach eh? I get the feeling his music is pretty well known despite being original in his time
  7. 08 Nov '17 10:23
    Originally posted by @karoly-aczel
    Oh? I thought it [ Jethro Tull ] was like ' Bon Jovi'
    Almost... except JT is not a leading member of JT. The original Jethro was the inventor of a horse-drawn seed drill during the early industrial revolution. The band was named after him.

    So, not exactly John Bon Jovi, but not exactly Pink ('Which of you is Pink?' ) Floyd, either.
  8. 13 Nov '17 20:15
    Originally posted by @karoly-aczel
    So many to choose from. But as a muso I cant go past "Spiderland" by Slint. A band led by an amazing drummer. A lot of harmonics, slow beautiful and loud guitars, alternate timings and drop " D " tunings: this album has put itself up there as the most original re-definition of rock music I've come across since the Velvet Underground . Of course there a ...[text shortened]... success measured in how many these bands inspired to start their own bands, not in record sales.
    AMM - "The Crypt" 12 June 1968

    Cornelius Cardew - piano. cello
    Lou Gare - saxophone, violin
    Christopher Hobbs - percussion
    Eddie Prevost- percussion
    Keith Rowe - guitar, electronics

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gnBLBOg0fw
  9. Standard member mchill
    Green Lantern
    13 Nov '17 22:02
    Originally posted by @karoly-aczel
    So many to choose from. But as a muso I cant go past "Spiderland" by Slint. A band led by an amazing drummer. A lot of harmonics, slow beautiful and loud guitars, alternate timings and drop " D " tunings: this album has put itself up there as the most original re-definition of rock music I've come across since the Velvet Underground . Of course there a ...[text shortened]... success measured in how many these bands inspired to start their own bands, not in record sales.
    Original is a difficult concept in music. My pick would be Fleetwood Mac. Lindsey Buckingham is a great guitarist, and Stevie Nicks has the voice of angels (a hottie too!)
  10. Standard member caissad4
    Child of the Novelty
    14 Nov '17 00:47
    Originally posted by @mchill
    Original is a difficult concept in music. My pick would be Fleetwood Mac. Lindsey Buckingham is a great guitarist, and Stevie Nicks has the voice of angels (a hottie too!)
    I first heard Fleetwood Mac on the radio in New Orleans, late 1973. Immediately went out and bought their album, Mystery to Me, on 8-track. It is still one of my favorites to listen to on You Tube.
  11. 08 Dec '17 17:09
    For originality it would be Radiohead for me. So many great albums.

    Ive been a musical funk for a while but recently discovered Warpaint, this song in particular has a fresh vibe to it.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ie6plcFQ330