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Culture Forum

  1. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    30 Jun '09 07:36
    Do you like his piano music?

    http://www.ubu.com/sound/cardew_piano.html

    Yes, I do.
  2. Standard member rbmorris
    Vampyroteuthis
    01 Jul '09 22:24
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Do you like his piano music?

    http://www.ubu.com/sound/cardew_piano.html

    Yes, I do.
    Same here! Downloading the files now. Thanks for posting this.
  3. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    02 Jul '09 07:40
    Originally posted by rbmorris
    Same here! Downloading the files now. Thanks for posting this.
    I was surprised, I was expecting something more academic.

    Ubu's on a roll, for my taste anyway. Give Jozef van Wissem a whirl too.
  4. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    02 Jul '09 10:23
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    I was surprised, I was expecting something more academic.
    Obviously I wouldn't have had I first read up on his life. Now it all makes sense.

    Did MI5 take him out? Clash of genres: trashy thrillers pulp the avant-garde.
  5. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    02 Jul '09 19:14
    See if you can find his Treatise online ... It's challenging.
  6. Standard member rbmorris
    Vampyroteuthis
    02 Jul '09 20:17 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    I was surprised, I was expecting something more academic.

    Ubu's on a roll, for my taste anyway. Give Jozef van Wissem a whirl too.
    Just went to Ubu. Looks like they have a bunch of Jozef van Wissem recordings. Listening now. Will keep an eye open for Treatise.
  7. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    02 Jul '09 20:21
    Originally posted by rbmorris
    Just went to Ubu. Looks like they have a bunch of Jozef van Wissem recordings. Listening now. Will keep an eye open for Treatise.
    You obviously weren't attracted by my evocative thread title in this forum, currently sinking all lonesome down below.

    I found a flash presentation of that thing, which is the oddest musical score I have seen. How it translates to music, I don't know, but it's interesting just to look at! Jim O' Rourke did a version of it.
  8. 03 Jul '09 03:22 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    You obviously weren't attracted by my evocative thread title in this forum, currently sinking all lonesome down below.

    I found a flash presentation of that thing, which is the oddest musical score I have seen. How it translates to music, I don't know, but it's interesting just to look at! Jim O' Rourke did a version of it.
    As for how it translates to music, I found this some time ago. I found it gave me some insight as to how the score might be approached. Have you seen it?
    http://www.blockmuseum.northwestern.edu/picturesofmusic/pages/anim.html

    Here's "A Young Persons Guide to Treatise" which contains some interesting information about Treatise as well as some MP3's.
  9. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    03 Jul '09 05:50
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    As for how it translates to music, I found this some time ago. I found it gave me some insight as to how the score might be approached. Have you seen it?
    http://www.blockmuseum.northwestern.edu/picturesofmusic/pages/anim.html

    Here's "A Young Persons Guide to Treatise" which contains some interesting information about Treatise as well as some MP3's.
    Yes, that's the thing I found. Fascinating!
  10. 03 Jul '09 10:10 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Yes, that's the thing I found. Fascinating!
    Yes, it is. It builds upon the systems for indeterminacy in music created by Cage, Feldman, et al. Cage's 4'33" might be the most famous example. I find the Cage score to be particularly beautiful because it is so brilliantly simple.

    Here's the link to "A Young Person's Guide..." that I omitted on my previous post.
    http://www.spiralcage.com/improvMeeting/treatise.html
  11. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    03 Jul '09 10:38
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    Yes, it is. It builds upon the systems for indeterminacy in music created by Cage, Feldman, et al. Cage's 4'33" might be the most famous example. I find the Cage score to be particularly beautiful because it is so brilliantly simple.

    Here's the link to "A Young Person's Guide..." that I omitted on my previous post.
    http://www.spiralcage.com/improvMeeting/treatise.html
    Thanks.

    Peculiarly, thinking about the images in the Cardew score has led me to discover that I can 'think' sound from shapes. Example: I 'heard' the sound of a circle on the way to work this morning.