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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    17 Mar '08 08:28
    Therefore, I want to start this thread, so the cultural diversity of RHP is reflected in recipes from all over the world, something that would benefit us all, enhance our gastronomic horizons, and bring pleasure to our lives through food.

    🙂

    Allow me to start


    =========
    BASIC SALSA
    =========

    Ingredients

    6 tomatoes
    2 garlic pieces
    1 onion
    2 habanero chiles
    salt & pepper to taste

    Boil the tomatoes until they start losing the skin. While they are boiling, heat 4 tablespoons of cooking oil in a frying pan. When oil is ready to bubble, place the chopped garlic, onion and chili on it until the garlic and onion start to get transparent. Do not burn! Then place the boiled tomatoes and smash them. Do not use a blender! Add salt and pepper as much as you like.

    And ready! Simple salsa.

    In the next delivery, I will share the recipe of the 'pico de gallo' or 'flag salsa', which is red, white and green, simple and very tasty.
  2. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    17 Mar '08 09:06
    ========
    FLAG SALSA
    ========

    Ingredients

    4 tomatoes
    2 onions
    4 green chiles

    Chop everything in small pieces, place in a bowl, squeeze half green lemon on top of everything, add some salt and pepper, mix.

    If you use this salsa inside a quesadilla, you will know what's true pleasure.

    Simply warm a flour tortilla with some cheese inside. When the cheese melts pull it out of the 'comal' (the pan you are using for warming the tortilla), place the salsa inside, and proceed to eat.
  3. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    17 Mar '08 10:09
    ========
    MONTERREY BEAN SOUP*
    ========

    Ingredients

    500 grams of black beans
    4 hotdog 'sausages'
    2 tomatoes
    1/2 onion
    2 garlic teeth
    1/2 knorr veggie flavor cube
    salt, pepper & cumin to taste

    Leave in water the beans for one full night. Next morning, flush the water of the beans, and boil them in new water (half liter), low heat & with the half cube of 'knorr', until the beans are soft.

    When the beans are getting softer, almost ready to eat, add chopped onion & garlic, as well as the sliced sausages, add salt, pepper and cumin, and the chopped tomatoes almost when the thing is done, perhaps 5 minutes before removing from the heat.

    Serve with crushed nachos or, even better, fry corn tortillas until they become hard, and crack them inside the bowl.

    * Personal recipe! 🙂
  4. Standard member Iron Monkey
    Primal Primate
    17 Mar '08 13:00
    I like cooking but i don't usually go strictly from recipes. right now i'm into Thai flavours. for a kind of green curry, try this

    put a little chicken stock, chopped lemongrass, green chilli, fish sauce, bunch of coriander, bunch of mint, tamarind paste, ginger (or galangal), and garlic in a blender and make a paste. smear this over raw chicken and leave in the fridge for an hour or more. heat peanut oil in a wok or pan, brown chicken. add coconut milk and any leftover paste. stir. cook chicken through. squeeze on some lime juice and mix through. voila!
  5. Standard member Iron Monkey
    Primal Primate
    17 Mar '08 17:14
    regarding the above: for a more 'green' effect, melt a block of frozen finely-chopped spinach into the dish in the final minutes of cooking. serve with rice.
  6. Standard member rbmorris
    Vampyroteuthis
    17 Mar '08 17:40 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Iron Monkey
    I like cooking but i don't usually go strictly from recipes. right now i'm into Thai flavours. for a kind of green curry, try this

    put a little chicken stock, chopped lemongrass, green chilli, fish sauce, bunch of coriander, bunch of mint, tamarind paste, ginger (or galangal), and garlic in a blender and make a paste. smear this over raw chicken and l ...[text shortened]... leftover paste. stir. cook chicken through. squeeze on some lime juice and mix through. voila!
    I love Thai food. There was this one restaurant in Boston that I used to go to that served this AMAZING Thai dish called Mee Krob. It's basically, crispy, sweet and spicy noodles with shrimp and pork (or chicken), some egg, cilantro, onion & garlic. Absolutely amazing. I don't eat meat anymore, but you could easily use a chicken substitute.

    Mee Krob

    **1 piece (2 inch) tamarind pulp (see alternate shortcut below)

    **¾ cup boiling water (see alternate shortcut below)

    vegetable oil (for deep frying and stir frying)

    6 oz of dried thin rice stick noodles (sen mee)

    2 cloves garlic (chopped)

    4 shallots (chopped)

    1/3 lb ground pork

    ¼ lb chopped shrimp

    3 ½ tbs tomato paste

    4 tbs sugar

    2 tbs fish sauce (nam pla)

    1 tps dried red chili flakes

    1 lime, juiced (about 3 tbs)

    2 eggs (whisked)

    Garnishes:

    2 cups fresh bean sprouts

    fresh cilantro leaves

    3 green onions cut into 1 ½ inch lengths

    The tamarind:

    Put the tamarind into a small bowl and pour ¾ cup of boiling water over
    it. Break up pulp with a fork. Let stand 20 min. Pour mixture through a
    sieve over a bowl and scrape off the mash from the underside of the
    sieve into the bowl. Set aside. **ALTERNATIVELY: buy pre-minced tamarind
    and mix with ¾ cup of water (quicker and easier).

    Frying the noodles:

    Heat vegetable oil (2-4 in deep) to 375 deg in a wok or frying pan. Set
    up a tray lined with paper towels (for draining). Make sure oil temp is
    right by dropping in 1 or 2 pieces of dry noodles. They should
    immediately puff up like cheese doodles. Drop noodles in the oil (in
    batches) and place on paper towels to drain. After draining, dump into
    brown paper shopping bag. You should have a good amount of crispy, puffy
    noodles. (They shrink down when you add the sauce.)

    In hot oil slowly pour in 2 wisked eggs. This will cook quickly. Take
    out and drain on paper towels.

    In the same hot wok or frying pan, dump out almost all of the oil
    (except a couple tbs), scrape out any remaining noodles, turn up heat to
    med high and dump in garlic and shallots. Stir fry for 1 min. Add pork,
    and 30 sec later, add chopped shrimp. Stir fry until meats are firm to
    the touch (1-2) min) Remove from heat and place in a bowl.

    Increase to high heat and add tomato paste and sugar. Stir constantly
    until mixture becomes a sticky, shiny red sauce that pulls away from the
    sides of the wok (approx 3 min). Add tamarind water and fish sauce…stir.
    Then add meat mixture, chili flakes and lime juice. Mix thoroughly.
    Remove from heat.

    In a large empty pot, take small batches of the crispy noodles and
    lightly toss with meat/sauce mixture. Do not add too much sauce,
    otherwise noodles get too soggy. Try to maintain some of the crispiness.

    Garnish with fresh green onions, bean sprouts, cilantro and egg. Serve and eat immediately.
  7. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    17 Mar '08 18:19 / 1 edit
    Why giving up meat?!

    Health reasons?
  8. Standard member rbmorris
    Vampyroteuthis
    17 Mar '08 19:10
    Originally posted by Seitse
    Why giving up meat?!

    Health reasons?
    Nah, not health reasons. I just sort of stopped enjoying it. I was pretty much vegetarian anyway. Then, after reading up on the meat industry, how filthy it is, and how cruel to animals it is, I decided to cut it out completely. I still eat fish (rarely) and eggs though.

    It's really horrible, if you see what actually goes on at these farms.
  9. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    17 Mar '08 19:23
    Originally posted by rbmorris
    Nah, not health reasons. I just sort of stopped enjoying it. I was pretty much vegetarian anyway. Then, after reading up on the meat industry, how filthy it is, and how cruel to animals it is, I decided to cut it out completely. I still eat fish (rarely) and eggs though.

    It's really horrible, if you see what actually goes on at these farms.
    I've never been in a slaughter house in the first world, but certainly in the 3rd world, and man... it was scary crap. I understand you, though, since I halted meat for a couple of months after that.

    But, next grill session with buddies... I couldn't resist that steak!

    Have you thought of alternatives? I mean, in case you crave it someday.

    What about that kobe meat? I've heard those cows are pretty damn happy.
  10. Standard member rbmorris
    Vampyroteuthis
    17 Mar '08 19:36
    Originally posted by Seitse
    I've never been in a slaughter house in the first world, but certainly in the 3rd world, and man... it was scary crap. I understand you, though, since I halted meat for a couple of months after that.

    But, next grill session with buddies... I couldn't resist that steak!

    Have you thought of alternatives? I mean, in case you crave it someday.

    What about that kobe meat? I've heard those cows are pretty damn happy.
    Honestly, like I said, I sort of lost the taste for it anyway. I was never all that into steaks, although I did appreciate a good burger every now and then.

    Actually, there's this meat substitute that my wife makes called "seitan". It's made out of wheat and vegetable broth and soy sauce and stuff. Very easy to put together. It has the look and texture of beef, and it's great with gravy or other sauces. I made a delicious vegetarian sauerbraten just recently. You can also make corned "beef", and lots of other things. My wife used it to make bracciole for my birthday, and it was delicious. I can even make pretty convincing "White Castle" mini burgers with it. (That's a regional thing. Maybe you've never had one, but they're delicious!)

    There are plenty of good chicken and turkey substitutes on the market too. It's actually surprisingly easy to be a vegetarian these days.
  11. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    17 Mar '08 19:40
    Originally posted by rbmorris
    Honestly, like I said, I sort of lost the taste for it anyway. I was never all that into steaks, although I did appreciate a good burger every now and then.

    Actually, there's this meat substitute that my wife makes called "seitan". It's made out of wheat and vegetable broth and soy sauce and stuff. Very easy to put together. It has the look and textu ...[text shortened]... on the market too. It's actually surprisingly easy to be a vegetarian these days.
    Maybe it's because I'm not acquainted with those options that I find it surprising. In my mind there's only soy meat to substitute, and it's yikes.

    Well, something is for sure, you'll live longer than I will! 🙂
  12. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    01 Jul '08 21:43
    Chicken Oxtail:

    Boil the potatoes after cutting them to a smaller than average size (amount doesn't matter), for half the usual time.

    Cut up chicken, paprika's, peppers, mushrooms, garlic, onions and stir fry greens (and basically anything else you can get your grubby hands on... amounts don't matter). Fry this up.

    Drain the potatoes, add the stir fry and a tin of oxtail soup. Or maybe two, if you've done a lot.
    Get it on a boil and then let it simmer.

    Then get curry powder (not hot, but with a strong flavour) and add as much as you deem suitable for the occasion.
    Then chili powder, pepper, salt and anything else lying around that you think would suit the taste and chuck that all in as well (be careful with the salt... and I'm slightly exaggerating the amount of herbs as well...)

    Then let it simmer until the soup becomes as thick as a sauce.
    Boil up some pasta and pour this over the pasta and serve.

    Excellent grub!