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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. 24 May '09 16:36
    Who wins, and why?

    Both great but I vote for Joan - not trained, but that allows her natural beauty and true feelings shine through.
  2. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    24 May '09 21:45 / 4 edits
    Originally posted by znsho
    Who wins, and why?

    Both great but I vote for Joan - not trained, but that allows her natural beauty and true feelings shine through.
    But there was another J, Joni. She had it all. Not exactly a folk singer except for her early work but brilliant beyond either Ju or Jo. She is also a pretty good painter. Her body of work comprises a lot of changes of style but always brilliant. Ju and Jo were singers and only wrote a handful of songs. Joni was an innovator on all her instruments, dulcimer, guitar, keyboards. My favorite concert was bootlegged on a very early Rhino records tape, live in Canada, not sure where, but around 1968, guitars, dulcimer, Joni Mitchell, James Taylor. Great concert. No backups, no band, just the two of them putting on a great show, both brilliant songwriters. There are websites devoted just to Joni Mitchell GUITAR TUNINGS. BTW, don't get me wrong, I love all three of them, have most of their albums. I first heard Joan live in 1960 from a tv show in Boston, I was stricken in an instant. In that era there were several more female folk singers of note, Odetta, Carolyn Hester, Judy Bright, Judy Henske, Hedy West, Jean Ritchie ( the real deal), Jean Redpath (scottish), Barbara Dane, Malvina Reynolds, (Little houses on the hilltop, little houses made of ticky tacky.....), Mary Travers of Peter Paul and Mary, I always heard conviction in her voice. Ronnie Gilbert of the Weavers, a really great singer from the group that started it all, June Tabor and Maddy Prior from the UK. Peggy Seeger, younger sister of Pete Seeger, wrote " I was gonna be an engineer" among others, great banjo player. Norma Waterson, wife of Martin Carthy, mother of Eliza Carthy, an up and coming folksinger/songwriter. Evelyn and Bob Beers, the Beers Family, from Florida, lots of great songs, Dunbartons Drums is one of songs they perform. Etta Baker, great guitar player of the Piedmont tradition, just died at the age of 93. Then there are the blues ladies, of which Etta was one, like Memphis Minnie, Bessie Smith, of course they were famous before the 1960's.
  3. 24 May '09 22:05
    Originally posted by znsho
    Who wins, and why?

    Both great but I vote for Joan - not trained, but that allows her natural beauty and true feelings shine through.
    i vote for Joan, my favorite piece of hers is singing Farewell Angelina, by Dylan, the lyrical imagery, the appeal to the imagination, is unparalleled, in my opinion, than any other piece of art, and who could sing it, but her?
  4. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    24 May '09 22:15 / 4 edits
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    i vote for Joan, my favorite piece of hers is singing Farewell Angelina, by Dylan, the lyrical imagery, the appeal to the imagination, is unparalleled, in my opinion, than any other piece of art, and who could sing it, but her?
    Did you see 'Silent Running' by any chance? I was thrilled by that Bruce Dern sci fi, featured a LOT of Joan Baez singing in it. I should really get a DVD of it, the music was an affirmation of the power of 60's US folksingers.
    It also featured the forerunner of R2D2. I always wondered if Joni Mitchell Anderson got one of the themes in her song Big Yellow Taxi from that movie, "Took all the trees, put 'em in a tree museum, charged the people a dollar and a half just to see 'em...."
    What did you think of 'Love is just a four letter word'? Did you hear the story of how she came by that song? I talk a lot about those singers, but Judy Collins is special too, remember 'Anathea'?, a gut wrenching version. Also, she got Lenard Cohen his start, literally pushing him onstage to sing his first great song, "Suzanne", he was so nervous he left the stage after the first verse and she got him back on and sang the song with him, which jumped started his career.
  5. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    27 May '09 19:21
    Shirley and Dorothy Collins are the ones I'm after.
  6. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 May '09 01:36
    Originally posted by Bosse de Nage
    Shirley and Dorothy Collins are the ones I'm after.
    Shirley Collins recorded a seminal record with the great Scottish guitarist Davy Graham, 'Folk roots, New Roots' in 1963, it's now considered a classic.
  7. 29 May '09 08:24
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Shirley Collins recorded a seminal record with the great Scottish guitarist Davy Graham, 'Folk roots, New Roots' in 1963, it's now considered a classic.
    i have heard of this man David Graham, but for the life of me i cannot think why or where?
  8. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 May '09 09:58
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    i have heard of this man David Graham, but for the life of me i cannot think why or where?
    He was (still is) a guitarist from Scotland who got his start around the year 1960 and was an innovator of technique who started the British guitar style which was exemplified by Bert Yansch and John Renbourn before, during and after their years in the great folk-rock band Pentangle. I saw John Renbourn perform at a guitar festival in Tel Aviv about ten years ago and got to talk to him for awhile afterwards and I asked him about the similarity in the riffs they played (Bert and John) to the guitar of Davy Graham. He answered in the early 60's they would follow Davy around his concert circuit like puppies, and he was their chief mentor. Unfortunately Davy got into an extreme drug habit that he only got out of about ten years ago and early on was on his way to stardom but he would show up for performances too stoned to play and got a bad reputation and stopped being able to get gigs. He never stopped playing however. He is still playing today, age something like 73, if you google his name, not David Graham but Davy Graham, you can find some great early material as well as some new interviews.
  9. 29 May '09 22:46
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    i have heard of this man David Graham, but for the life of me i cannot think why or where?
    Check out Angie.
  10. 29 May '09 23:17
    Originally posted by znsho
    Check out Angie.
    yes i knew the track from Simon and Garfunkel and of course Bert Yansch, but i did not know of its origin.
  11. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    29 May '09 23:18
    Originally posted by znsho
    Check out Angie.
    Well that tune seems to have been stolen by Davy, I have a friend in Tel Aviv, Shay Tochner whose brother claims to have written it and Davy heard it and took it over. But that doesn't matter much now. Davy did a version of it early on, but the REAL Angie belongs to Bert Jansch. See his record 'Lucky Thirteen', it has THE version of angie, not improved upon to this day. It is the definitive version, far more interesting than Davy Graham's version. You listen to the two side by side and there is no comparison, like Grahams version is a truncated simplified piece for a newbie guitarist to learn. Bert Jansch plays the version that striving guitarists ATTEMPT to play even today. Sad thing is, I saw a recent version he did live (ended up a video on You Tube) and it was a pathetic thing compared to his peak. It was like Bert Jansch with Alzhiemer's.
  12. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    31 May '09 03:28
    Originally posted by znsho
    Who wins, and why?

    Both great but I vote for Joan - not trained, but that allows her natural beauty and true feelings shine through.
    I'd vote for Collins, but I like them both.