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  1. 05 Aug '08 00:14
    Is awesome! Just got it today! Already have several new scores going just for the heck of it.

    Anyone else have it?
  2. Standard member neonpeon41
    The Conductor
    05 Aug '08 02:48
    No, I'm stuck in 2 land. I still love my Sibelius, though. I was disappointed when I found out the guy I hired to write my marching show this year uses Finale. Booooooo Finale!

    np
  3. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    05 Aug '08 06:30
    I've played all the Sibelius symphonies. All of them are great.
  4. 05 Aug '08 16:34
    Originally posted by neonpeon41
    No, I'm stuck in 2 land. I still love my Sibelius, though. I was disappointed when I found out the guy I hired to write my marching show this year uses Finale. Booooooo Finale!

    np
    Boo finale, encore, etc. Sibelius ROCKS!
  5. 05 Aug '08 16:46
    Originally posted by AttilaTheHorn
    I've played all the Sibelius symphonies. All of them are great.
    Ha, I am glad I am not the only one who thought scherzo was talking about the 5th Symphony!

    Software-wise, I use Lilypond. I regularly get frustrated with it when I need to do something I haven't done before or that I can't remember how to do, but it works well enough for simple stuff (I mostly need it to write down songs without accompaniment), and the result usually looks quite nice.
  6. 05 Aug '08 16:49
    Originally posted by Nordlys
    Ha, I am glad I am not the only one who thought scherzo was talking about the 5th Symphony!

    Software-wise, I use Lilypond. I regularly get frustrated with it when I need to do something I haven't done before or that I can't remember how to do, but it works well enough for simple stuff (I mostly need it to write down songs without accompaniment), and the result usually looks quite nice.
    Ha, I am glad I am not the only one who thought scherzo was talking about the 5th Symphony!

    Sorry about that.

    Software-wise, I use Lilypond. I regularly get frustrated with it when I need to do something I haven't done before or that I can't remember how to do, but it works well enough for simple stuff (I mostly need it to write down songs without accompaniment), and the result usually looks quite nice.

    Never even heard of that. Use Sibelius.
  7. 05 Aug '08 18:05
    Originally posted by scherzo
    Never even heard of that.
    http://lilypond.org/web/

    The main advantage is that it's free.
  8. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    05 Aug '08 20:46
    >Yes, I really did think the thread was about the Sibelius 5th Symphony!
    >So if I may divert the subject to that for a moment, a few years ago our orchestra devoted a whole season to playing somebody's 5th symphony on each program. We played the 5th symphonies of Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky, Bruckner, Mahler, Sibelius, Shostakovich, Prokofiev, and even Haydn. Somehow, we left out Mozart.
    >As 1st horn, I was in 7th heaven, but not 5th heaven!
  9. Standard member sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    06 Aug '08 05:11
    Originally posted by scherzo
    Is awesome! Just got it today! Already have several new scores going just for the heck of it.

    Anyone else have it?
    Does Sibelius have the ability to take a midi input and print a score from it, like from a synth keyboard?
    I used something, I forget which one, maybe Project 5, not sure now, (Cakewalk) and it printed out what I played alright but it analyzed the timing down to the millisecond so if you were slighly off timingwise the result looked awful, a bunch of tied 8th notes strung out nothing like what you would actually write. I wondered if there was something with a bit more intelligence that recognized timing intent and not just take the millisecond by millisecond note timing as written in stone.
  10. Standard member Nemesio
    Ursulakantor
    06 Aug '08 05:17 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Does Sibelius have the ability to take a midi input and print a score from it, like from a synth keyboard?
    I used something, I forget which one, maybe Project 5, not sure now, (Cakewalk) and it printed out what I played alright but it analyzed the timing down to the millisecond so if you were slighly off timingwise the result looked awful, a bunch of tied ...[text shortened]... timing intent and not just take the millisecond by millisecond note timing as written in stone.
    All of the programs will do that if you don't set the quantization settings properly. You can take
    any MIDI and 'round it to the nearest semidemiquaver' (e.g.) to clean up the score in any of
    the mainstream engraving programs (Finale, Sibelius, &c).

    Keep in mind that MIDI captures use such quantizations as part of their protocol, although the
    fine tuning of it is on the order of milliseconds. However, if you are a really high-level performer,
    such alterations are discernible to the ear. I can't tell, but a few of my performing friends can
    tell the difference between a MIDI capture of their playing and a true playback.

    The same goes for MIDI's capture of key velocity (dynamics).

    Nemesio
  11. Subscriber gregsflat
    William Penn's gaze
    09 Aug '08 15:26
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    All of the programs will do that if you don't set the quantization settings properly. You can take
    any MIDI and 'round it to the nearest semidemiquaver' (e.g.) to clean up the score in any of
    the mainstream engraving programs (Finale, Sibelius, &c).

    Keep in mind that MIDI captures use such quantizations as part of their protocol, although the
    fine tu ...[text shortened]... a true playback.

    The same goes for MIDI's capture of key velocity (dynamics).

    Nemesio
    Call me old fashion, but I still write everything by hand. Does anybody out there remember when you had to hand in manuscript with no mistakes using the chisel point pens that had manuel ink loading?
    I bet half the music majors studying today can't write what they hear. Unless aided by Sibelius or the like.
    I did just get Sibelius 5 at an education discount. I want to document my teaching examples more orderly. I have over 500 hand written arrangements in my band book- 4 horns and full rhythm, I'd love to transfer to computer program, but the best I can do there is keep PDF files from scans.
    I'm also writing new arrangements for a school band program I just started last year.
  12. 09 Aug '08 18:39
    Originally posted by gregsflat
    Call me old fashion, but I still write everything by hand. Does anybody out there remember when you had to hand in manuscript with no mistakes using the chisel point pens that had manuel ink loading?
    I bet half the music majors studying today can't write what they hear. Unless aided by Sibelius or the like.
    I did just get Sibelius 5 at an education d ...[text shortened]... scans.
    I'm also writing new arrangements for a school band program I just started last year.
    Good for you! Sibelius is the only way to write music. Unless you want people to not be able to read your notation (as happens with me quite often; I don't know about you).
  13. Standard member neonpeon41
    The Conductor
    10 Aug '08 04:04
    Originally posted by AttilaTheHorn
    >Yes, I really did think the thread was about the Sibelius 5th Symphony!
    >So if I may divert the subject to that for a moment, a few years ago our orchestra devoted a whole season to playing somebody's 5th symphony on each program. We played the 5th symphonies of Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky, Bruckner, Mahler, Sibelius, Shostakovich, ...[text shortened]... ven Haydn. Somehow, we left out Mozart.
    >As 1st horn, I was in 7th heaven, but not 5th heaven!
    Sibelius's third symphony was what I played for my first pro gig in college. I was assistant principal and the orchestra was playing all the Sibelius symphonies over three seasons.

    np
  14. Standard member Nemesio
    Ursulakantor
    10 Aug '08 20:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by gregsflat
    I bet half the music majors studying today can't write what they hear. Unless aided by Sibelius or the like.
    Dictation is a separate skill from engraving, and I don't know why Sibelius would make dictation
    any easier. The only advantage that I could possible think of would be the use of the playback
    function, but it's my guess that someone so unskilled as to need playback to know if their
    dictation was right or wrong would probably be at a loss to correct something that didn't
    match up when they heard it. I would think it would be easier to do it by hand simply because
    you can sketch the shape of lines faster with a pencil than with a mouse.

    I would imagine that people only use music notation programs because their handwriting is
    atrocious, it's easy to correct mistakes, or so they can mass produce scores (like for a choir).
    Frankly, having looked at several hundred manuscripts from as early as the 10th century, I
    wish Sibelius had been available to the Italian monks back then!

    Nemesio
  15. 11 Aug '08 00:18
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    Dictation is a separate skill from engraving, and I don't know why Sibelius would make dictation
    any easier. The only advantage that I could possible think of would be the use of the playback
    function, but it's my guess that someone so unskilled as to need playback to know if their
    dictation was right or wrong would probably be at a loss to correct some ...[text shortened]... 10th century, I
    wish Sibelius had been available to the Italian monks back then!

    Nemesio
    I would imagine that people only use music notation programs because their handwriting is atrocious ...

    That's me!

    It also helps write actual scores. Otherwise you have to purchase just the right amount of staff paper with just the right number of staves, and keep track of which staff is which.