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Culture Forum

  1. Standard member Nemesio
    Ursulakantor
    11 Apr '08 05:25
    Observe: Almost every technical aspect of this pianist's playing (Glenn Gould) is totally wrong
    from a pedagogical standpoint (as just about any teacher will tell you).

    YouTube&feature=related

    Yet the result is wonderful.

    Nemesio
  2. Donation kirksey957
    Outkast
    11 Apr '08 07:46
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    Observe: Almost every technical aspect of this pianist's playing (Glenn Gould) is totally wrong
    from a pedagogical standpoint (as just about any teacher will tell you).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nluYZFaaiA&feature=related

    Yet the result is wonderful.

    Nemesio
    I think he fell and broke his tail bone as a young boy. The chair that he always sat in while he played was one his father made for him.
  3. 11 Apr '08 10:32
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    Observe: Almost every technical aspect of this pianist's playing (Glenn Gould) is totally wrong
    from a pedagogical standpoint (as just about any teacher will tell you).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nluYZFaaiA&feature=related

    Yet the result is wonderful.

    Nemesio
    Wasn't this the case with Louis Armstrong's trumpet playing?
  4. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    11 Apr '08 10:47
    Originally posted by Mephisto2
    Wasn't this the case with Louis Armstrong's trumpet playing?
    You should have seen Debussy's puppeteering ...
  5. Standard member ChronicLeaky
    Don't Fear Me
    11 Apr '08 11:44
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    Observe: Almost every technical aspect of this pianist's playing (Glenn Gould) is totally wrong
    from a pedagogical standpoint (as just about any teacher will tell you).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nluYZFaaiA&feature=related

    Yet the result is wonderful.

    Nemesio
    Weird; I was going to start a spin-off thread on "I Want to Write a Book" called "So, I Want to Write a Fugue" yesterday, but I forgot.

    Gould's recordings of Bach either really do it for me or really don't. The link you gave is wonderful, but:

    YouTube&feature=related

    is butchery of one of my favourite pieces of music. "The Art of Fugue" is not supposed to sound like a human is playing it. It's supposed to sound like otherwordly evidence that the Scientologists are right!
  6. Standard member Nemesio
    Ursulakantor
    11 Apr '08 17:24
    Originally posted by ChronicLeaky
    Weird; I was going to start a spin-off thread on "I Want to Write a Book" called "So, I Want to Write a Fugue" yesterday, but I forgot.

    Gould's recordings of Bach either really do it for me or really don't. The link you gave is wonderful, but:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyNy4EJsZqY&feature=related

    is butchery of one of my favourite pieces ...[text shortened]... t. It's supposed to sound like otherwordly evidence that the Scientologists are right!
    Classic.

    YouTube
  7. Donation kirksey957
    Outkast
    11 Apr '08 23:10
    Originally posted by Nemesio
    Classic.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1ain4qftoM
    Nem, what's your take on this?

    YouTube
  8. Standard member Nemesio
    Ursulakantor
    12 Apr '08 04:21 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by kirksey957
    Nem, what's your take on this?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RfA4zyHcIPo
    What do I think of the piece? I think it's a sublime solo cantata. Stylistically, it reminds one
    of the opening movement of the sixth Brandenburg Concerto, with its pulsating but static bassline
    over an imitative pair of strings.

    What do I think of the performance? I find Baroque music on modern strings to be less satisfying
    than on the older style gut strings. Furthermore, the sound of Glenn Gould's 'harpsipiano' that
    he designed specifically for this piece is irritating beyond measure. That having been said, his
    rendering of the figured bass is at times very, very creative. And I hate the sound of the countertenor;
    it's a product of that late 50s/early 60s Bach as Wagner era (big orchestras, huge orchestras,
    whiny soloists). He puts a fast vibrato on every single note. It's atrocious.

    I personally find almost all of Gould's interpretations worthy of study, even when I categorically
    disagree with them. He was unabashed in his self-centeredness -- he was totally uninterested
    in what the composer may have wanted, but in what he could extract from the music -- and
    I find this sort of honesty refreshing. And when playing the music he loved, he did so with an
    unbridled ecstasy. I find myself unperturbed by his grotesqueries of gesture, his grunting, or
    mannerisms. Most musicians I know who are intoxicated by the musical experience (as I am)
    usually feel on the inside what he exudes on the outside. In that way, it's almost cathartic to
    watch if you can suspend your disbelief at the social graces he violates at every turn.

    Incidently, the recitative and second aria (which is totally different in character, being a fugue)
    is at this link, for those interested in the whole piece.
    YouTube&feature=related

    Edit: I find this performance about a million times more satisfying.

    YouTube&feature=related