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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Sep '13 10:51
    I came across this phrase on a BBC report about the new Iphone 5C which will sell for a hundred bucks US. Anyone know the etymology of that phrase? Never heard it before. Did it start in the UK?
  2. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    11 Sep '13 13:46 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I came across this phrase on a BBC report about the new Iphone 5C which will sell for a hundred bucks US. Anyone know the etymology of that phrase? Never heard it before. Did it start in the UK?
    "In consumer marketing, an aspirational brand (or product) means a large segment of its exposure audience wishes to own it, but for economical reasons cannot. An aspirational product implies certain positive characteristics to the user, but the supply appears limited due to limited production quantities.

    An important characteristic of an aspirational product is that the part of its exposure audience that is at present economically unable to purchase it, thinks of itself as having a fair probability of at a certain point in the future being able to do so. This part of the exposure audience is referred to as the aspirational audience, whereas the part of the exposure audience that already can afford the product is called the consumption audience. Consumption audience and aspirational audience together form the aspirational product's target audience, which typically represents 30%-60% of the exposure audience

    Weak aspirational brands have target audiences that are almost as large as their exposure audiences (e.g. mp3 player brands), and are therefore slowly becoming commodity brands, e.g. brands with consumption audiences that coincide with the exposure audience (and therefore, brands without an aspiring audience).

    As a general rule, an aspirational brand and its products can command a price premium in the marketplace over a commodity brand. This ability can to a large extent be explained by the consumer's need for invidious consumption for which he is willing to pay a premium. The smaller the size of the product's target audience compared to the exposure audience, the more the product satisfies this need, and the higher the premium that such a consumer is prepared to pay.

    The larger the ratio of aspirational to consumption consumers in the target audience, the higher the brand's premium, e.g. Maybach cars. To keep the premium level of a brand high, the consumption portion of the audience should not exceed 30% of the aspirational audience." (wiki)

    Appears to subliminally imply, you've arrived and are one of the few who both can afford and deserve the latest and best (like Dos Equis Beer's Most Interesting Man in the World). And, in doing so, providing psychic income to it's audience.
  3. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    11 Sep '13 14:07
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    "In consumer marketing, an aspirational brand (or product) means a large segment of its exposure audience wishes to own it, but for economical reasons cannot. An aspirational product implies certain positive characteristics to the user, but the supply appears limited due to limited production quantities.

    An important characteristic of an aspirational ...[text shortened]... resting Man in the World). And, in doing so, providing psychic income to it's audience.
    So was this phrase invented by the advertising industry? I was curious when and where it came about.
  4. Standard member Grampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    11 Sep '13 16:06
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    So was this phrase invented by the advertising industry? I was curious when and where it came about.
    Dunno.