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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    29 Apr '11 19:16 / 1 edit
    If a teacher suspects that a child is excluded within family life at home, but not abused, and this situation can vary from a cultural aspect where by there is no social service input, and the teacher believes this exclusion is affecting the child's development, then does the teacher approach the parents, or ignore and carry on with the rest of business as usual?

    This situation could, if interfered with, involve the child's removal from the school, without authorative investigation.

    How would you deal with this one?

    Debate seriously please.

    -m.

    Edit: My personal opinion is that the 'exclusion at home' is in itself a form of abuse, by the way, but wouldn't be perceived that way in this particular culture!
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    29 Apr '11 19:20
    Do you mean "neglect"?
  3. 29 Apr '11 19:25
    Originally posted by mikelom
    If a teacher suspects that a child is excluded within family life at home, but not abused, and this situation can vary from a cultural aspect where by there is no social service input, and the teacher believes this exclusion is affecting the child's development, then does the teacher approach the parents, or ignore and carry on with the rest of business as u ...[text shortened]... a form of abuse, by the way, but wouldn't be perceived that way in this particular culture!
    Your edit, I think says it all. Although I agree with your "personal opinion" one does have to respect the culture of your "adopted" country. Have you a relationship with the parents? If so is it such that you can broach the subject with them in a tactful and respecrtful way?
  4. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    29 Apr '11 19:45 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Do you mean "neglect"?
    No. The child is not considered as valuable as elders, and the money and attention is spent on them. The youngest is pretty much left to a world of her own, including being left away from family vacations and left at home with the maid. She isn't neglected in a sense that she is very well fed and cared for physically. Emotionally excluded.
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    29 Apr '11 19:49
    Originally posted by mikelom
    No. The child is not considered as valuable as elders, and the money and attention is spent on them. The youngest is pretty much left to a world of her own, including being left away from family vacations and left at home with the maid. She isn't neglected in a sense that she is very well fed and cared for physically. Emotionally excluded.
    That's emotional neglect.

    http://www.americanhumane.org/children/stop-child-abuse/fact-sheets/child-neglect.html

    Parental behaviors considered to be emotional child maltreatment include:

    •Ignoring (consistent failure to respond to the child’s need for stimulation, nurturance, encouragement and protection or failure to acknowledge the child’s presence);
    •Rejecting (actively refusing to respond to the child’s needs — e.g., refusing to show affection);
  6. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    29 Apr '11 19:56
    Originally posted by Great Big Stees
    Your edit, I think says it all. Although I agree with your "personal opinion" one does have to respect the culture of your "adopted" country. Have you a relationship with the parents? If so is it such that you can broach the subject with them in a tactful and respecrtful way?
    Hi mate! My edit does suggest that I am, and probably always will be, a guest here. Of course, anybody in a foreign country is a guest, and should honour that.

    I broached my level head, who had had concerns also as she, as me as the first to raise questions, had observed this little one is unable to mix and do any kind of group work. My level head has said the parents are unapproachable (very wealthy indeed, as this is a private international school)... ; which road does that lead to?

    This child is aged 8, and very adorable. She isn't aggressive, just totally passive. She relates to me, runs to me and hugs me, and I don't even teach her! I spend time with her talking in Thai, and she likes the attention - but I don't see it as attention - I see it as her feeling a relationship, and her being loved. She walks away smiling. I have spoken to her homeroom teacher, who sees her as anon.
  7. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    29 Apr '11 20:00
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    That's emotional neglect.

    http://www.americanhumane.org/children/stop-child-abuse/fact-sheets/child-neglect.html

    Parental behaviors considered to be emotional child maltreatment include:

    •Ignoring (consistent failure to respond to the child’s need for stimulation, nurturance, encouragement and protection or failure to acknowledge the child ...[text shortened]... ing (actively refusing to respond to the child’s needs — e.g., refusing to show affection);
    Yes mate, but this is Thailand where nobody drives with car insurance or a licence, there is no social services.. etc. etc.

    In the west it is neglect, as I see it also.

    However, tact doesn't exist here.

    That's why I am trying to have a kind of brain storming event, if you like.
  8. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    29 Apr '11 20:01
    Sounds like you should stay out of it. Give the kid some affection and let it go.
  9. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    29 Apr '11 20:19 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Sounds like you should stay out of it. Give the kid some affection and let it go.
    Her English is quite superb. In her class her spoken English is number 2, in between 3 foreign kids whose parents are western. I suspect she watches English TV a lot, probably alone, as we are an English speaking school. Her Thai, written, is awful. Her math is awful. Her GPA is 2.1, and yet she speaks English so well, and her brothers' and sister's English is just passable - not good, not bad. Leave her alone and let her get on with it?

    Of couse she gets the attention and affection, how could I not when she comes running and holds my hand. I am not in class with her. My leveL head has suggested I take it no further, as she may be removed (I see that as a financial asertion for money coming in, and not the needs of the child)..

    How can I let a child with a particular skill or gift let go? Even if the family are unapprochable.. OR ARE THEY? ?

    Edit: I'd put my job on the line for this one... or am I crazy to do so?
  10. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    29 Apr '11 20:24
    Originally posted by mikelom
    Her English is quite superb. In her class her spoken English is number 2, in between 3 foreign kids whose parents are western. I suspect she watches English TV a lot, probably alone, as we are an English speaking school. Her Thai, written, is awful. Her math is awful. Her GPA is 2.1, and yet she speaks English so well, and her brothers' and sister's English ...[text shortened]... .. OR ARE THEY? ?

    Edit: I'd put my job on the line for this one... or am I crazy to do so?
    There is a LOT of truly horrific stuff going on in the world. This kid is mildly neglected, her parents are powerful and you are an outsider. Pick your battles and don't make waves. Keep your perspective.

    This sort of emotional attachment is why so many teachers are on the verge of becoming revolutionaries.
  11. Standard member mikelom
    Ajarn
    29 Apr '11 20:32
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    There is a LOT of truly horrific stuff going on in the world. This kid is mildly neglected, her parents are powerful and you are an outsider. Pick your battles and don't make waves. Keep your perspective.

    This sort of emotional attachment is why so many teachers are on the verge of becoming revolutionaries.
    You are right there!

    But emotional attachment for me goes from K1-g12.

    Maybe all teachers should form an educational ARMY, in the world - I'm sure it would be a pretty large one..

    I shall play with her, teach her (in my recess times and when she sees me) and see that she smiles.
  12. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    29 Apr '11 20:45
    Originally posted by mikelom
    You are right there!

    But emotional attachment for me goes from K1-g12.

    Maybe all teachers should form an educational ARMY, in the world - I'm sure it would be a pretty large one..

    I shall play with her, teach her (in my recess times and when she sees me) and see that she smiles.
    Maybe all teachers should form an educational ARMY, in the world - I'm sure it would be a pretty large one..

    They're working on it. Give me the willies to be honest. Legitimate points are one thing but these people are in some cases fanatics.
  13. 29 Apr '11 21:15
    "I shall play with her, teach her (in my recess times and when she sees me) and see that she smiles." That, to me is the best you can hope for because as you mentioned the parents may "pull" her out of the school, seeing you (the school) as meddling in areas of their culture best left to them as parents.