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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    21 Aug '11 15:08
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/21/us-strausskahn-idUSTRE77J20620110821

    The Post reported that the prosecutors' motion would detail concerns about Diallo's credibility and make it clear they do not believe they can prove the charges beyond a reasonable doubt.


    I will read the prosecutor's motion (it it's made public) before I make a final judgment on whether I agree with the decision to drop the charges. I hope No1 will do the same.
  2. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    21 Aug '11 15:13 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by sh76
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/21/us-strausskahn-idUSTRE77J20620110821

    The Post reported that the prosecutors' motion would detail concerns about Diallo's credibility and make it clear they do not believe they can prove the charges beyond a reasonable doubt.


    I will read the prosecutor's motion (it it's made public) before I make a f ...[text shortened]... gment on whether I agree with the decision to drop the charges. I hope No1 will do the same.
    We've heard these types of rumors before in this case. I'd wait until the court appearance Tuesday before assuming they are correct (as you have done in the past).

    The factual content of any sentence that begins with the words" "The Post reported" should be viewed with a pound (not a grain) of salt.
  3. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    23 Aug '11 16:20
    Seems the criminal case has been dropped.
  4. 23 Aug '11 16:38
    Just because they can't prove it? That's no reason to drop the case. The prosecutor obviously still thinks he's guilty!
  5. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    23 Aug '11 18:11
    Prosecutor's motion to dismiss

    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/08/22/nyregion/dsk-recommendation-to-dismiss-case.html

    ...But the nature and number of complainant's falsehoods leave us unable to credit her version of events beyond a reasonable doubt, whatever the truth may be about the encounter between the complainant and the defendant. If we do not believe her beyond a reasonable doubt, we cannot ask a jury to do so.


    (page 2)
  6. 23 Aug '11 19:04
    Something tells me she'll still try to get paid. I don't see him settling.
  7. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    23 Aug '11 19:28 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    Something tells me she'll still try to get paid. I don't see him settling.
    Bet he defaults rather than get deposed.

    Or quietly settles; I don't see him wanting to face a jury in NY.
  8. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    23 Aug '11 20:43 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Bet he defaults rather than get deposed.

    Or quietly settles; I don't see him wanting to face a jury in NY.
    That's a no-brainer.

    He's not interested in flying back to New York to give a deposition or testimony. That would be the case whether he's guilty or innocent. His much better strategy is to default and collaterally attack any enforcement attempts (or settle, of course).
  9. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    23 Aug '11 21:03 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sh76
    That's a no-brainer.

    He's not interested in flying back to New York to give a deposition or testimony. That would be the case whether he's guilty or innocent. His much better strategy is to default and collaterally attack any enforcement attempts (or settle, of course).
    Yeah, it's not like he flies to NYC at all normally. Well, except for his daughter living there ..........................................

    EDIT: Long ago, she was his "ironclad" alibi: http://www.businessinsider.com/dsk-alibi-2011-5