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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 03 May '11 21:38
    In Canada's latest federal election the Liberals dropped to the lowest number of seats since Confederation.
    Is this it for the Grits?
  2. 03 May '11 21:49
    Probably not. Ebb and flow.

    The bloc is a local party defined based on an issue that isn't even all that popular in the only province where they even try to get elected.

    The liberal party will likely increase next time assuming they get a better leader.

    The NDP even lost their official party status a while back and now look at them.
  3. 03 May '11 22:31
    Originally posted by PsychoPawn
    Probably not. Ebb and flow.

    The bloc is a local party defined based on an issue that isn't even all that popular in the only province where they even try to get elected.

    The liberal party will likely increase next time assuming they get a better leader.

    The NDP even lost their official party status a while back and now look at them.
    There's talk of the NDP and Liberals joining (both are left leaning). As a Canadian I'm sure you're aware that there have only ever been two parties that have won a federal election (majority or not) and I think that will hold true in the future. The Conservatives (a rightwing "joining" of the Progressive Conservatives and the Reform Party) are here to stay because Canadians , on the whole, are a conservative lot. (Not I BTW) If there's any hope of a rival for the Conservatives it has to be a joining of both the Liberals and the NDP.
    I'm just saying.
  4. 04 May '11 03:49
    The Liberal Party (in my opinion) must under no circumstances merge with the NDP. They're already leaning left, to turn totally would be a mistake. Obviously Canadian politics (and the population) are polarized. We have left and we have right. I believe a strong centre is the best solution to this country's problems. Just on record: I have nothing against Mr. Layton...I just don't like his policies.

    Liberal plan of attack: my opinion

    1. Elect Justin Trudeau as their leader. (not Bob Rae, anyone but him)
    2. Make a lot of noise; oppose whatever conservatives propose.
    3. Criticize NDP and conservatives.
    4. Build up a credible, centrist platform that has the best of right and left.
    5. Aggressively advertise that platform.
    6. Run promotion (not attack) ads.
    7. Use social media to appeal to more voters.
    8. Wait for any mistake of the party leaders and pounce on it.
    9. Split up the most zones of control, and strategically invest in advertising to those zones of control...(e.g. aggressively advertise in Toronto...lawn signs, TV ads, door-to-door, rallies)
    10. Take it slowly: take time to rebuild an re-think...next election they will still probably end up in third...but the one after that, perhaps re-elected as opposition party...or if Harper messes up totally as the government.

    What do you guys thin? I'm open to criticism. Is this a good plan for the liberals?

    P.S. Well done Mr. Ignatieff...You ran a fine campaign...it was the negative attack ads, and the unexplainable aversion people seemed to have to Harvard and Oxford. Truly unfortunate...out of all the leaders he was the most educated, the only one not a career politician, and had great international perspective.
  5. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    04 May '11 19:15
    Originally posted by Great Big Stees
    In Canada's latest federal election the Liberals dropped to the lowest number of seats since Confederation.
    Is this it for the Grits?
    No, the Libs will be fine as long as they pick a good leader...Trudeau or Kennedy...maybe even John Manley.

    The election was mostly about the voters rejecting Ignatieff. The guy was horrible. He came across as stale cardboard. He isn't a leader. He's more suited to one of the guys in the background offering sound advice to the leader.

    Once the Libs have a charasmatic young leader, the voters will flock back to them, especially after having to put up with 4 years of a Harper government giving tax breaks to businesses and the rich while dismantling Health care and driving up the fiscal deficit to rediculous levels.

    Canada will be a much meaner place 4 years from now and Canadians will be yearning for a kinder, gentler approach.
  6. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    04 May '11 20:26
    Originally posted by PsychoPawn
    Probably not. Ebb and flow.

    The bloc is a local party defined based on an issue that isn't even all that popular in the only province where they even try to get elected.

    The liberal party will likely increase next time assuming they get a better leader.

    The NDP even lost their official party status a while back and now look at them.
    I agree. As the old Beatle song said:

    "They've been going in and out of style, but the're guaranteed to raise a smile."