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  1. 29 Mar '17 21:14 / 1 edit
    On 3 May 2016, Kaname Harada died. He was 99 years old.
    He's believed to have been the last surviving Japanese pilot who had
    participated in the raid on Pearl Harbor.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaname_Harada

    According to another source, Harada revisited Pearl Harbor in 1991,
    when the USA invited--a spirit of reconciliation--a few Japanese veterans
    to attend the 50th anniversary remembrance of the raid on Pearl Harbor.
    Reportedly, Harada was shocked to discover that Japan had *not* declared
    war before attacking Pearl Harbor. During the war, he apparently had
    been told or assumed that Japan had declared war before attacking
    Pearl Harbor, and he never had questioned it since. This realization
    moved Harada to become an anti-war activist in Japan, making public
    criticisms of its right-wing government's apparently increasing militarism.

    I would add that Harada was no stranger to the horrors of war *before* Pearl Harbor.
    "While in China he [Harada] witnessed Japanese military personnel indiscriminately
    killing Chinese civilians in the mistaken belief that they were soldiers in disguise."
    --Wikipedia

    My point is that even when was 75 years old, Kaname Harada was able to change his views
    and find the courage to take a controversial, if not unpopular, public position in his society.
  2. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    29 Mar '17 21:48
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    On 3 May 2016, Kaname Harada died. He was 99 years old.
    He's believed to have been the last surviving Japanese pilot who had
    participated in the raid on Pearl Harbor.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaname_Harada

    According to another source, Harada revisited Pearl Harbor in 1991,
    when the USA invited--a spirit of reconciliation--a few Japanese vete ...[text shortened]...
    and find the courage to take a controversial, if not unpopular, public position in his society.
    And he likely faced ridicule for doing so.
    The nail which sticks up, gets hit in the head.
  3. 29 Mar '17 22:17
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    And he likely faced ridicule for doing so.
    The nail which sticks up, gets hit in the head.
    Some Japanese critics (such as the late historian Saburo Ienaga) of Japan's wars in
    1931-1945 have received death threats from extreme right-wing Japanese nationalists.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabur%C5%8D_Ienaga
  4. Subscriber FreakyKBH
    Acquired Taste...
    29 Mar '17 22:34
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Some Japanese critics (such as the late historian Saburo Ienaga) of Japan's wars in
    1931-1945 have received death threats from extreme right-wing Japanese nationalists.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabur%C5%8D_Ienaga
    Yup...
  5. 30 Mar '17 05:36
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Some Japanese critics (such as the late historian Saburo Ienaga) of Japan's wars in
    1931-1945 have received death threats from extreme right-wing Japanese nationalists.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabur%C5%8D_Ienaga
    Well Japan is known for not dealing with their past. They still have 靖国 (yasukuni shrine) and politicians like the likes of 東條ゆううこ(Yuuko Toujou), prime minister Toujou's granddaughter running around. She's dead now but she has been replaced.

    I love Japan but they need to stop teaching propaganda in school history class.