Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 15 Oct '12 19:05
    "The primary social problem is not the prevention of tyranny but the control of chaos."

    (John J. Reilly)

    Is he right?
  2. 15 Oct '12 19:32
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    "The primary social problem is not the prevention of tyranny but the control of chaos."

    (John J. Reilly)

    Is he right?
    On this subject -- chaos or tyranny, I'd say the primary social problem is staying somewhere in between them because society keeps changing so the equilibrium point is not static. Another axis these relate to is the axis of freedom and security.
  3. 15 Oct '12 23:26
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    "The primary social problem is not the prevention of tyranny but the control of chaos."

    (John J. Reilly)

    Is he right?
    One of main dangers of chaos is that people don't like it, and may accept Tyranny as a way of restoring order.

    So I suppose the least amount of Tyranny required to obtain the optimum level of order would be the way to go.
  4. 16 Oct '12 00:52
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    One of main dangers of chaos is that people don't like it, and may accept Tyranny as a way of restoring order.

    So I suppose the least amount of Tyranny required to obtain the optimum level of order would be the way to go.
    One of the main dangers of tyranny is that people don't like it and may accept chaos as a way of restoring liberty.

    I suppose the least amount of chaos required to obtain the optimal level of liberty would be the way to go.

  5. 16 Oct '12 01:35
    Originally posted by JS357
    One of the main dangers of tyranny is that people don't like it and may accept chaos as a way of restoring liberty.

    I suppose the least amount of chaos required to obtain the optimal level of liberty would be the way to go.

    That could also work I suppose
  6. 16 Oct '12 01:39
    It does remind me of the Stuart restoration though.
  7. 16 Oct '12 05:12 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    That could also work I suppose
    A mild, civilized example:


    Scotland to hold vote on independence
    '14 referendum on separating from U.K. set

    http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/news/world/scotland-to-hold-vote-on-independence-657741/#ixzz29R4qzEE0

    If they vote yes, a mild degree of chaos will ensue, while the aspirants to the new mild tyranny sort it out.
  8. 16 Oct '12 05:22
    Originally posted by JS357
    A mild, civilized example:


    Scotland to hold vote on independence
    '14 referendum on separating from U.K. set

    http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/news/world/scotland-to-hold-vote-on-independence-657741/#ixzz29R4qzEE0

    If they vote yes, a mild degree of chaos will ensue, while the aspirants to the new mild tyranny sort it out.
    They intend to remain in the sterling zone and I think most of the potential chaos will be neutralized by the experts in the application of mild tyranny otherwise known as civil servants.
  9. 16 Oct '12 10:19
    Originally posted by kevcvs57
    That could also work I suppose
    Which do you think most people are more afraid of, tyranny or chaos?
  10. 16 Oct '12 17:14
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Which do you think most people are more afraid of, tyranny or chaos?
    Depends largely on population density.
  11. 16 Oct '12 17:25
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Depends largely on population density.
    Would you care to clarify that interesting theory?
  12. 17 Oct '12 08:22
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Which do you think most people are more afraid of, tyranny or chaos?
    Chaos, but I think that is part of our innate desire for community, but for the same reason, I think that in practice We would be happier with chaos than tyranny.