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Debates Forum

  1. Standard member RBHILL
    Acts 13:48
    21 Dec '13 16:37
    Churches and Cities working together?

    For The Last 3 years or so about that long. The City of Fresno came to the local Churches to each get a park to take care of and clean because the city has no money to clean them. So my church that I attend got one. We clean it up and play games, help with home work, and share the love of Jesus with them. And we always invite the community when it is around all the holidays.

    What are your thoughts?
  2. 21 Dec '13 16:46
    Originally posted by RBHILL
    Churches and Cities working together?

    For The Last 3 years or so about that long. The City of Fresno came to the local Churches to each get a park to take care of and clean because the city has no money to clean them. So my church that I attend got one. We clean it up and play games, help with home work, and share the love of Jesus with them. And we always invite the community when it is around all the holidays.

    What are your thoughts?
    Those who are religious, i.e. those who attend a religious service about every week, are much more likely to give their time and money to those in need according to a University of Stanford study.

    http://www.hoover.org/publications/policy-review/article/6577
  3. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    21 Dec '13 16:56
    Originally posted by RBHILL
    Churches and Cities working together?

    For The Last 3 years or so about that long. The City of Fresno came to the local Churches to each get a park to take care of and clean because the city has no money to clean them. So my church that I attend got one. We clean it up and play games, help with home work, and share the love of Jesus with them. And we always invite the community when it is around all the holidays.

    What are your thoughts?
    Not a bad idea. I doubt this will work for every park, but I'd wager it would work for many of them. Community involvment is a good idea.
  4. 21 Dec '13 17:04
    Originally posted by bill718
    Not a bad idea. I doubt this will work for every park, but I'd wager it would work for many of them. Community involvment is a good idea.
    But I thought that religion is the source of all our ills. Are you suggesting otherwise Bill?
  5. 21 Dec '13 17:50 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by bill718
    Not a bad idea. I doubt this will work for every park, but I'd wager it would work for many of them. Community involvment is a good idea.
    If the church is seen to perform actions of social utility this is likely to make its doctrines overall appear more credible to many people. So whether the (in themselves admirable) actions of the Fresno church are desirable overall may depend on how you feel about Christianity playing a greater role in politics.

    In many Muslim-majority countries, the growth in fundamentalist sentiment has in part been a response to the viciousness of the state or its inability to fulfill its expected functions.
  6. 21 Dec '13 18:09
    Originally posted by RBHILL

    What are your thoughts?
    It's better than praying to God to get parks cleaned up.
  7. Standard member RBHILL
    Acts 13:48
    21 Dec '13 18:28
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    It's better than praying to God to get parks cleaned up.
    Well I am sure they pray well their there.
  8. Standard member sasquatch672
    Don't Like It Leave
    21 Dec '13 22:57
    Originally posted by RBHILL
    Churches and Cities working together?

    For The Last 3 years or so about that long. The City of Fresno came to the local Churches to each get a park to take care of and clean because the city has no money to clean them. So my church that I attend got one. We clean it up and play games, help with home work, and share the love of Jesus with them. And we always invite the community when it is around all the holidays.

    What are your thoughts?
    My thoughts are, you improved your community. Congratulations, and thank you on behalf of the people who live in that neighborhood. You did noble work.

    Your church has set a fine example for your community.
  9. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    22 Dec '13 00:15
    Originally posted by RBHILL
    Churches and Cities working together?

    For The Last 3 years or so about that long. The City of Fresno came to the local Churches to each get a park to take care of and clean because the city has no money to clean them. So my church that I attend got one. We clean it up and play games, help with home work, and share the love of Jesus with them. And we always invite the community when it is around all the holidays.

    What are your thoughts?
    My thought is that pride goeth before the fall.
  10. 22 Dec '13 00:19 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Teinosuke to Bill718
    If the church is seen to perform actions of social utility this is likely to make its doctrines overall appear more credible to many people. So whether the (in themselves admirable) actions of the Fresno church are desirable overall may depend on how you feel about Christianity playing a greater role in politics.

    In many Muslim-majority coun ...[text shortened]... n a response to the viciousness of the state or its inability to fulfill its expected functions.
    In some predominantly Muslim societies, Islamic institutions provide
    significant services (which the state fails to do) to the needy and poor.
    Some Westerners have objected to this on the grounds that it's better for
    poor Muslims to suffer rather than for Islamic institutions to draw support.
  11. 23 Dec '13 09:02 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    In some predominantly Muslim societies, Islamic institutions provide
    significant services (which the state fails to do) to the needy and poor.
    Some Westerners have objected to this on the grounds that it's better for
    poor Muslims to suffer rather than for Islamic institutions to draw support.
    That objection is of course inhumane. Maybe the same Westerners should think about sending aid to the same Muslim societies in order to provide an alternative source of those services through secular channels.
  12. 23 Dec '13 16:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    That objection is of course inhumane. Maybe the same Westerners should think about
    sending aid to the same Muslim societies in order to provide an alternative source of those
    services through secular channels.
    In the United States, some people from Muslim immigrant families have
    got into trouble with the Department of Homeland Security on account of
    sending money to Islamic charities (some of whom claim to serve anyone,
    Muslim or non-Muslim, in need) in their ancestral homelands.
    The US government's suspicion or accusation is that many Islamic charities
    are simply a front for Muslim 'terrorism'. Even if that's true in some cases,
    to what extent should an individual Muslim be blamed for acting in good
    faith--assuming one did--by giving to an apparently reputable charity? If
    a Christian were to give money to a Christian charity, whose leaders then
    proceeded to use some of it for non-charitable aims (there's corruption
    in some Christian charities), should that Christian also be held accountable?

    If I recall correctly, there was a case a few decades ago in the USA.
    An American Jew (who had no children) died and left his entire estate to
    various charities, largely Jewish. Yet he did donate a modest proportion
    (perhaps 20,000 USD) to the Palestinian Red Crescent. Why? He had
    no record as a political activist critical of Israel. He had visited Lebanon,
    however, and he might have been impressed by Palestinian Red Crescent's
    health services (on a low budget) for Palestinians in refugee camps.
    I suspect that his donation was a humanitarian gesture of reconciliation.
    But some influential American Jewish groups were outraged by that gesture.
    The Palestinian Red Crescent was affiliated with the Palestinian Liberation
    Organization, which the US government condemned as a 'terrorist' group.
    The argument was that it should be illegal for any American (as well as
    immoral for any Jew) to donate anything to anyone affiliated with the PL0.
    So these American Jewish groups challenged the will in court. The
    representatives of the Palestinian Red Crescent were placed in a very
    difficult position. While they appreciated the donation and wished to
    honour this American Jew's intent by accepting it, they also knew that
    their American Jewish adversaries were much better funded and politically
    connected in the United States. It would cost much more in legal fees
    to contest the will than the donation was worth. Also, given the common
    demonization of the Palestinians in the US media, the Palestinian Red
    Crescent seemed unlikely to receive an unbiased hearing in the USA.
    I don't recall the outcome. But I doubt that the Palestinian Red Crescent
    received the donation, which could have helped some Palestinian refugees
    in need of health services.