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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 14 Apr '10 02:26
    Should students be allowed to stay in high school until they're 22 years old if they are too thick witted to graduate from the 12th grade?

    Or should we just throw in the towel and admit that it's a waste of time trying?
  2. 14 Apr '10 02:30
    Originally posted by Sam The Sham
    Should students be allowed to stay in high school until they're 22 years old if they are too thick witted to graduate from the 12th grade?

    Or should we just throw in the towel and admit that it's a waste of time trying?
    I always thought that the public school system finds way to "graduate" these folks, if you know what I mean? In fact, don't they have kids graduating who can't read?
  3. 14 Apr '10 02:34
    Originally posted by whodey
    I always thought that the public school system finds way to "graduate" these folks, if you know what I mean? In fact, don't they have kids graduating who can't read?
    The law now allows kids to stay in school until they're 22 which is ridiculous, been that way for almost 10 years I think.

    It was the latest in liberal thinking.
  4. 14 Apr '10 02:37
    Originally posted by Sam The Sham
    The law now allows kids to stay in school until they're 22 which is ridiculous, been that way for almost 10 years I think.

    It was the latest in liberal thinking.
    So your telling me that when they reach 23 they just kick these kids....er....um men-children and women-children to the curb!! :'(

    How uncaring can ya get?
  5. 14 Apr '10 02:46 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    So your telling me that when they reach 23 they just kick these kids....er....um men-children and women-children to the curb!! :'(

    How uncaring can ya get?
    No on their 22nd birthday they're out.

    Of High School.

    Fortunately most of them decide it's lame and don't do it, it's the special ed kids that stay.
  6. 14 Apr '10 02:51
    Originally posted by Sam The Sham
    No on their 22nd birthday they're out.
    I say Obama creates a program for these kids. Lets call it, "No man-child left behind". What we will do is propose a value added tax to fund a program to educate these kids until they reach their 40th birthday. Of course, if they still fail they can be provided an "early retirement" fully funded by the tax payers, of course. Brilliant!!
  7. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    14 Apr '10 05:06
    Originally posted by Sam The Sham
    Should students be allowed to stay in high school until they're 22 years old if they are too thick witted to graduate from the 12th grade?

    Or should we just throw in the towel and admit that it's a waste of time trying?
    I am very sorry to hear about the problem running in your family.

    Stay strong, pops.
  8. Standard member joneschr
    Some guy
    14 Apr '10 05:28
    I never knew anyone that old who hadn't graduated by 19 and actually wanted to stay in school. I mean, really, why would they?

    The only thing I can think is that a policy like that would be intended for kids that had some seriously missed opportunities in life and were back on track but way behind.

    But even then...
  9. 14 Apr '10 08:39
    How is it done in USA, if you are, say 25 years of age, and want the education you've missed earlier?
  10. 14 Apr '10 14:13 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    How is it done in USA, if you are, say 25 years of age, and want the education you've missed earlier?
    State and local governments have various adult education programs. Those who never graduated from high school can study for and pass a GED test that certifies them as having achieved "high school level skills"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Educational_Development
  11. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    14 Apr '10 14:15
    *insert right-wing rant about the state enforcing decisions on individuals*

    Oh.
  12. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    14 Apr '10 14:17
    Originally posted by Palynka
    *insert right-wing rant about the state enforcing decisions on individuals*

    Oh.
    You mean the guvamint ?
  13. 14 Apr '10 17:00
    Originally posted by Melanerpes
    State and local governments have various adult education programs. Those who never graduated from high school can study for and pass a GED test that certifies them as having achieved "high school level skills"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Educational_Development
    Thanks for the reply.

    Are these adult education programs for free, or does it cost anything?
  14. 14 Apr '10 19:48
    Originally posted by whodey
    I always thought that the public school system finds way to "graduate" these folks, if you know what I mean? In fact, don't they have kids graduating who can't read?
    kids in some states are surprised to find out ex post facto that if they don't pass the state exams, they can't graduate from high school and can't attend the prom.
  15. 14 Apr '10 22:39
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    kids in some states are surprised to find out ex post facto that if they don't pass the state exams, they can't graduate from high school and can't attend the prom.
    and I would imagine many of those kids find the latter consequence to be much more alarming than the former