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  1. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    28 Nov '12 14:41
    http://www.npr.org/2012/11/26/165943685/egyptian-judges-prepare-for-a-strike

    After a series of controversial decrees by Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi, the country's judges are conflicted over what to do.

    The president and Egypt's highest judicial authority met Monday to try to resolve the crisis, but the decrees, which essentially nullify judicial oversight, remained in place. And the judges are going ahead with plans for a strike.

    Yussef Auf has been a judge for 10 years and says he has never witnessed such an affront to his profession.

    "It's the biggest attack on the judges so far I've seen in my life. In the history of the Egyptian judiciary, I think it might be the biggest one or the second biggest one," says Auf, 35.

    etc/


    Will Egyptian Democracy die in its cradle or will this end in a government with separation of powers and an independent judiciary?
  2. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    28 Nov '12 15:06
    Originally posted by sh76
    http://www.npr.org/2012/11/26/165943685/egyptian-judges-prepare-for-a-strike

    [quote]After a series of controversial decrees by Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi, the country's judges are conflicted over what to do.

    The president and Egypt's highest judicial authority met Monday to try to resolve the crisis, but the decrees, which essentially nullify judici ...[text shortened]... or will this end in a government with separation of powers and an independent judiciary?
    Holdover judges from the Muburak era keep dissolving elected assemblies on dubious grounds. It's kinda difficult to get to a government with separation of powers when the judges keep insisting that the people elected to write the Constitution are illegitimate based on rules passed during a dictatorship.
  3. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    28 Nov '12 15:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Holdover judges from the Muburak era keep dissolving elected assemblies on dubious grounds. It's kinda difficult to get to a government with separation of powers when the judges keep insisting that the people elected to write the Constitution are illegitimate based on rules passed during a dictatorship.
    It seems like what they need is a new Constitution that would establish an independent judiciary but impose some legitimate checks on their authority.
  4. Standard member spruce112358
    Democracy Advocate
    28 Nov '12 15:56
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Holdover judges from the Muburak era keep dissolving elected assemblies on dubious grounds. It's kinda difficult to get to a government with separation of powers when the judges keep insisting that the people elected to write the Constitution are illegitimate based on rules passed during a dictatorship.
    There's no way judges should be dissolving the Constitutional convention.

    Morsi's actions are extreme but perhaps necessary to get to true democracy.
  5. 28 Nov '12 18:08
    Originally posted by sh76
    http://www.npr.org/2012/11/26/165943685/egyptian-judges-prepare-for-a-strike

    [quote]After a series of controversial decrees by Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi, the country's judges are conflicted over what to do.

    The president and Egypt's highest judicial authority met Monday to try to resolve the crisis, but the decrees, which essentially nullify judici ...[text shortened]... or will this end in a government with separation of powers and an independent judiciary?
    I have been wondering what is going on with this.