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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 07 Jul '11 03:26
    That's right, I'm here to endorse FDR for president. Why? Just take a look at some of his positions in the past.

    FDR made the age to collect social security to be 65 in 1935, which was the average life expetancy of someone at that time. Today, the average life expectancy is 78.3 years. To be consistant, I would think FDR would move the age to be able to collect social security to be aournd 78 years.

    Secondly, FDR was against collective bargaining. The reason why? He said, "a strike of public employees manifests nothing less than an intent on their part to obstruct the operations of government until their demands are satisfied. Such action looking toward the paralysis of government by those who have sworn to support it is unthinkable and intolerable."

    And to think, FDR, the man whom the left worships, was a bigger conservative than our modern day Scotty Walker. Hilarious!!!
  2. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    07 Jul '11 04:01
    Originally posted by whodey
    Hilarious!!!
    If absolutely nothing else, you certainly are easily amused, whodey.
  3. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    07 Jul '11 05:21
    Who the hell is FDR?

    Not all of us living in trailer parks and have nothing better to do than chew tobacco, beat the wife and follow American soap.
  4. Subscriber Sleepyguy
    Reepy Rastardly Guy
    07 Jul '11 05:43
    Originally posted by shavixmir
    Who the hell is FDR?

    Not all of us living in trailer parks and have nothing better to do than chew tobacco, beat the wife and follow American soap.
    Let me Google that for you.

    http://lmgtfy.com/?q=FDR
  5. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    07 Jul '11 06:02
    Originally posted by Sleepyguy
    Let me Google that for you.

    http://lmgtfy.com/?q=FDR
    Yeah. Like I'm gonna google every half-witted moron you yanks talk about.
  6. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    07 Jul '11 06:35
    Originally posted by shavixmir
    Yeah. Like I'm gonna google every half-witted moron you yanks talk about.
    According to Google, "shavixmir" is Walloon slang for cat scat.
  7. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    07 Jul '11 10:12
    Originally posted by Soothfast
    According to Google, "shavixmir" is Walloon slang for cat scat.
    Look who dipped his head out of the trailer.
  8. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    07 Jul '11 18:20 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by shavixmir
    Look who dipped his head out of the trailer.
    Seriously. It's a contraction of "chat" and "merde," where "merde d'chat" becomes "chatte merde" or somesuch (not sure on spellings), or "shavi-mir" in the Belgian dialect. The "x" is silent, of course.
  9. 07 Jul '11 22:32 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by whodey
    And to think, FDR, the man whom the left worships, was a bigger conservative than our modern day Scotty Walker. Hilarious!!!
    The next time someone calls me a 'extremist far-left socialist/commie pinko-bastard' when I'm discussing universal healthcare I'll take them to this thread so they can feel better.
  10. 07 Jul '11 23:16
    Originally posted by whodey
    That's right, I'm here to endorse FDR for president. Why? Just take a look at some of his positions in the past.

    FDR made the age to collect social security to be 65 in 1935, which was the average life expetancy of someone at that time. Today, the average life expectancy is 78.3 years. To be consistant, I would think FDR would move the age to be able t ...[text shortened]... he left worships, was a bigger conservative than our modern day Scotty Walker. Hilarious!!!
    Secondly, FDR was against collective bargaining. The reason why? He said, "a strike of public employees...

    It seems FDR was only referring to the public sector when he made these remarks, which in their proper context are perfectly reasonable.
    I doubt FDR would be critical of the unions' collective bargaining in regards to private companies.

    Nevertheless it is refreshing to see one of the forum's most inflexible right-wing doctrinaires fashioning himself as a New Dealer.
  11. 07 Jul '11 23:57
    Originally posted by generalissimo
    [b]Secondly, FDR was against collective bargaining. The reason why? He said, "a strike of public employees...

    It seems FDR was only referring to the public sector when he made these remarks, which in their proper context are perfectly reasonable.
    I doubt FDR would be critical of the unions' collective bargaining in regards to private compani ...[text shortened]... ne of the forum's most inflexible right-wing doctrinaires fashioning himself as a New Dealer.[/b]
    My only point is to point out how far left the left has gone. A man who was once on the far left would today be viewed more of a threat than any conservative politician today.
  12. 08 Jul '11 00:24
    Originally posted by whodey
    My only point is to point out how far left the left has gone. A man who was once on the far left would today be viewed more of a threat than any conservative politician today.
    That would be true, except for the fact that time does not stand still.
  13. 08 Jul '11 00:51
    Originally posted by whodey
    My only point is to point out how far left the left has gone. A man who was once on the far left would today be viewed more of a threat than any conservative politician today.
    How we use the term "left" or "right" have changed over the years. This is no surprise. What would you call Theodore Roosevelt in today's terms?
  14. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    08 Jul '11 04:23
    Originally posted by badmoon
    How we use the term "left" or "right" have changed over the years. This is no surprise. What would you call Theodore Roosevelt in today's terms?
    I don't think anyone in Europe would call anyone in the US left-wing.
    Your left-wingers are our right-wingers. Well, they used to be until the mid 90's.

    It seems that good old Chicago school of economics which has treated the world to such great entities as Yeltsin, China and Pinochet has firmly grasped Europe's politicians by the nuts.

    But that's where the problem in Europe lies, as is evident in Greece. Politicians, banks and multi-nationals want to go in one direction, but the mentality isn't as sheepish as it is in the US.