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  1. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    04 Jun '10 23:09 / 2 edits
    This is an interview with Amy Chua, author of a book about hyperpowers. She's a Yale Law School professor who specializes in establishing rule of law in developing nations or something like that.

    Is she accurate in what she says?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QenLlFx4cCQ&feature=related

    My response so far:

    Very interesting so far. It starts with the Campanigli (or however you spell it, the UC Berkeley tower) which I like. Then the lady says France claimed that the US was culturally dominant over France (as well as in other ways). That made me laugh.

    The thesis of the book she is plugging: hyperpowers all rise to dominate through tolerance [EDIT - "strategic tolerance" for the purpose of harnassing the abilities of the elites for realpolitik reasons]

    Very interesting.
  2. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    04 Jun '10 23:18
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    This is an interview with Amy Chua, author of a book about hyperpowers. She's a Yale Law School professor who specializes in establishing rule of law in developing nations or something like that.

    Is she accurate in what she says?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QenLlFx4cCQ&feature=related

    My response so far:

    Very interesting so far. It st ...[text shortened]... book she is plugging: hyperpowers all rise to dominate through tolerance.

    Very interesting.
    For those of you who haven't read the book or heard the interview: her use of the word tolerance is not to be confused with the current day usage of the term.
  3. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    04 Jun '10 23:39 / 1 edit
    Interesting. She's claiming the presence of Jews is an indicator of potential hyperpowerdom.

    EDIT - 25:38
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    04 Jun '10 23:41
    Originally posted by adam warlock
    For those of you who haven't read the book or heard the interview: her use of the word tolerance is not to be confused with the current day usage of the term.
    Right, my apologies. It's "strategic tolerance" i.e. harnassing the elites through relative tolerance compared to rival powers.
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    04 Jun '10 23:55
    Another interesting statement - the USA cannot produce patriotism far from home like Rome could.

    Hawaii is pretty far from New England and Washington D.C...

    29:22
  6. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    05 Jun '10 00:04
    Excellent video. I recommend it heartily. It's about an hour long. I'm about 2/3 through it.
  7. 05 Jun '10 06:20
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Another interesting statement - the USA cannot produce patriotism far from home like Rome could.

    Hawaii is pretty far from New England and Washington D.C...

    29:22
    Hawaii is home.
  8. 05 Jun '10 06:26
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperpower

    A hyperpower is a state that is militarily, economically and technologically dominant on the world stage. In some instances, in a modern context, it has been used to describe the United States.[1][2][3][4] Previous examples of hyperpowers include the British Empire,[5][6][7] Imperial China,[8][9] the Mongol Empire,[10] and the Roman Empire.[11][12][13] [14] In academic International relations literature, the term hegemony is much more common.

    Origin

    After the end of the Cold War, some political commentators felt that a new term was needed to describe the United States' position as the lone superpower. Peregrine Worsthorne used the term "hyper-power" on June 30, 1956. French Minister Hubert Védrine popularized the term "hyperpower" in his various criticisms of the United States beginning in 1967.[15]
  9. 05 Jun '10 06:35
    re the rest of guys, how can a power be "hyper" if it's local?
  10. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    05 Jun '10 07:12 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    Hawaii [b]is home.[/b]
    Yep. And British people were at home in Brittania, Rome.
  11. 05 Jun '10 08:06
    ok, comprendo.
  12. 05 Jun '10 12:09
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    re the rest of guys, how can a power be "hyper" if it's local?
    I wonder what would have happened if Britain had decided to fully incorporate all of its colonies - essentially granting places like India full British statehood and citizenship like the US did with Hawaii.
  13. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    05 Jun '10 17:22
    Originally posted by Melanerpes
    I wonder what would have happened if Britain had decided to fully incorporate all of its colonies - essentially granting places like India full British statehood and citizenship like the US did with Hawaii.
    It'd be much harder due to cultural and geographic barriers in the age before the telegraph.
  14. 07 Jun '10 18:15 / 1 edit
    telegraph to Hawaii back then?
  15. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    07 Jun '10 21:50
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    telegraph to Hawaii back then?
    Around that time, yes. Late 1800's.