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Debates Forum

  1. 01 Jan '13 19:07
    I am reposting to correct the thread title. If you reply, please reply to this one.

    If you are interested in a highly esteemed teacher of history, I suggest you look at J. Rufus Fears' obituary to see if he is the kind of person whose writings and especially videos, would interest you.

    http://www.ou.edu/cas/classics/people/fears/inmemoriamjrf.html

    Also here is a taste of his style, in a presentation on the story of freedom.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqgQ1B2Jjz0
  2. 02 Jan '13 04:18
    Originally posted by JS357
    I am reposting to correct the thread title. If you reply, please reply to this one.

    If you are interested in a highly esteemed teacher of history, I suggest you look at J. Rufus Fears' obituary to see if he is the kind of person whose writings and especially videos, would interest you.

    http://www.ou.edu/cas/classics/people/fears/inmemoriamjrf.html

    Als ...[text shortened]... style, in a presentation on the story of freedom.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqgQ1B2Jjz0
    Marvelous lecture, such great detail.
  3. 03 Jan '13 03:35
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Marvelous lecture, such great detail.
    Bump. This is just a must see and listen.
  4. 06 Jan '13 18:45
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Marvelous lecture, such great detail.
    This is sort of a bump but also a question: Have you seen any of the subsequent 18 parts? If so, what do you think?

    I also recommend his "Famous Greeks" but they don't seem to be free anywhere. In his chapter on Alcibiades and the Peloponnesian War, he convincingly posits that the plays The Trojan Women and Lysistrata were not antiwar when interpreted by the values of the day and are only seen that way in our time. Instead these plays were entirely prowar.

    Famous Greeks
    by J. Rufus Fears
    4.25 of 5 stars 4.25 · rating details · 20 ratings · 3 reviews
    High quality, university level teaching.

    Course Lecture Titles - (24 lectures, 30 minutes/lecture)

    1. Theseus
    2. Achilles and Agamemnon
    3. Hector
    4. Odysseus
    5. Lycurgus
    6. Solon
    7. Croesus
    8. Xerxes
    9. Leonidas
    10. Themistocles
    11. Pausanias
    12. Pericles
    13. Anaxagoras, Phidias, and Aspasia
    14. Sophocles
    15. Thucydides
    16. Alcibiades
    17. Nicias
    18. Alcibiades and the Peloponnesian War
    19. Lysander and Socrates
    20. The Trial of Socrates
    21. Xenophon, Plato and Philip
    22. Alexander the Great
    23. Pyrrhus
    24. Cleopatra
  5. 07 Jan '13 04:01
    Originally posted by JS357
    This is sort of a bump but also a question: Have you seen any of the subsequent 18 parts? If so, what do you think?

    I also recommend his "Famous Greeks" but they don't seem to be free anywhere. In his chapter on Alcibiades and the Peloponnesian War, he convincingly posits that the plays The Trojan Women and Lysistrata were not antiwar when interpreted by th ...[text shortened]... Socrates
    21. Xenophon, Plato and Philip
    22. Alexander the Great
    23. Pyrrhus
    24. Cleopatra
    No, but I do intend to look for them. The good professor has a style of narrative that puts one right into the scene, and his details are wonderful.

    The style of his lecture reminded me of Bruce Catton's writing style in his books on the Civil War. You can almost smell the powder and feel the canon balls breaking through the brestworks.