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Debates Forum

  1. 28 May '09 13:23
    Daniel Finklestein writing in the Times yesterday said that he came across a recent US opinion poll in which a quarter of Americans blame the Jews either moderately or a great deal for the financial crisis, and 40% attached some blame to Jews.
    Surprised? It never occurred to me to blame a religous group.
    Is there a high proportion of Jews in volved in Wall Street?
  2. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    28 May '09 13:36 / 1 edit
    ===Daniel Finklestein writing in the Times yesterday said that he came across a recent US opinion poll in which a quarter of Americans blame the Jews either moderately or a great deal for the financial crisis, and 40% attached some blame to Jews.===

    Why do they even poll this crap? I'd also like to hear how they worded the questions. Did they say "Are the Jews responsible for your problems?" Or, did they say "Do you think one or more Jews played a role in the events that caused the financial crisis?" There's a world of importance in how they word the questions.


    ===Surprised?===

    Not in the least. Disappointed, but not surprised.


    ===Is there a high proportion of Jews in volved in Wall Street?===

    Of course there are; but what does that have to do with anything? "The Jews" is not a homogeneous unit or hive that does everything concurrently. What does Bernie Madoff have to do with Yankel Feffercorn from Brooklyn? To "blame" an entire group of people of whom a tiny subset are relevant is clueless, bigoted and ignorant.

    Hopefully, I'm not telling anyone anything they didn't already know and agree with.
  3. Standard member Seitse
    Doug Stanhope
    28 May '09 13:40
    Stupid.

    Jews are also numerous in the American showbiz, and that doesn't mean they are to blame for Tom Cruise movies.

    P.S. Even though I've been looking for the guilty in order to slap him/her.
  4. Standard member joneschr
    Some guy
    28 May '09 13:45
    Originally posted by eamon o
    Daniel Finklestein writing in the Times yesterday said that he came across a recent US opinion poll in which a quarter of Americans blame the Jews either moderately or a great deal for the financial crisis, and 40% attached some blame to Jews.
    Surprised? It never occurred to me to blame a religous group.
    Is there a high proportion of Jews in volved in Wall Street?
    Well, Alan Greenspan is jewish, so there you go.
    I'm not at all surprised, because Jews are frequently stereotyped as being greedy bankers. I have no idea what history and statistics actually support jews being prominent in financial industries. But really, it's just a stereotype. People will bizarre reasons for every misfortune.
  5. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    28 May '09 13:54
    Originally posted by sh76
    Why do they even poll this crap? I'd also like to hear how they worded the questions. Did they say "Are the Jews responsible for your problems?" Or, did they say "Do you think one or more Jews played a role in the events that caused the financial crisis?" There's a world of importance in how they word the questions.
    I agree, disingenuous poisonous crap. But one wonders, do you question the wording of questions in polls whose results support your views? And, honestly speaking, do you lead with those misgivings when you discuss the polling data that supports your opinions?
  6. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    28 May '09 13:59 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by FMF
    I agree, disingenuous poisonous crap. But one wonders, do you question the wording of questions in polls whose results support your views? And, honestly speaking, do you lead with those misgivings when you discuss the polling data that supports your opinions?
    Fair question.

    You're right. We should look at the wording of all polls before we cite them.

    For election polls it's not really necessary, because all they ask is "If the election were held today, who would you vote for?" And, in any case, we know from experience that telephone polls (but not exit polls) are usually deadly accurate in recent US electoral history.

    But, for these types of polls where the wording can make a big difference, we should look at the wording whether we like the result or not.

    I hereby pledge to try to look for the wording of these types of polls before I cite them in the future.
  7. 28 May '09 14:12
    Originally posted by sh76
    Why do they even poll this crap? I'd also like to hear how they worded the questions.
    why not ask him?
    daniel.finklestein@thetimes.co.uk