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  1. 10 Feb '13 02:32 / 1 edit
    Lasagna? hmmm...

    I used to be paranoid about food additives, aspartame, sodium benzoate n stuff. So the horse story came as a bit of a surprise, How on earth did that slip by??

    On the news tonight, yes some of us were eating 100% horse.

    I think they might have to drop the 'Smart Scots Give it Aldi' campaign.

    what does this story mean?
  2. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    11 Feb '13 15:58
    Originally posted by e4chris
    Lasagna? hmmm...

    I used to be paranoid about food additives, aspartame, sodium benzoate n stuff. So the horse story came as a bit of a surprise, How on earth did that slip by??

    On the news tonight, yes some of us were eating 100% horse.

    I think they might have to drop the 'Smart Scots Give it Aldi' campaign.

    what does this story mean?
    It means the supermarket supply chains are too long and there's too much scope for this kind of thing. I've been buying bacon from a small butchers instead of being lazy and getting it with the rest of my shopping in Tesco for a while. I do this on simple quality grounds - the stuff they give you in supermarkets is paper thin and goes hard within about 12 hours of the pack being opened. The stuff from the family run butcher is what you'd expect bacon to be. I'm stopping buying any meat from supermarkets as I don't trust their safety controls. It's all too anonymous and the people working in it don't have enough equity in it to care. With small retailers they know both the customers and the producers (at least at the abattoir level) - the supply chain is short so micromanagement and control is possible. This also leaves everything much fresher.

    The stuff about this being a criminal conspiracy is bunk. They may well have been breaking the law, but these were producers agreeing to cut corners not the mafia - more like the LIBOR scandal. Owen Patterson doesn't want to face the real problem which is the length and complexity of the supermarkets' supply chains and their inability to exert control over it, which involves multiple countries all with their own rules.
  3. 11 Feb '13 16:14
    agree the rush to provide cheap meat, especially in ready meals, means we are being fed junk, chicken for ready meals comes from all over the world too... Also this does seem like a criminal conspiracy, no accident

    you don't see many vegetarian ready meals, i think these should become more popular, you can have better quality then.
  4. 11 Feb '13 17:55
    Should I buy a saddle of beef ?
  5. 11 Feb '13 18:05
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    It means the supermarket supply chains are too long and there's too much scope for this kind of thing. I've been buying bacon from a small butchers instead of being lazy and getting it with the rest of my shopping in Tesco for a while. I do this on simple quality grounds - the stuff they give you in supermarkets is paper thin and goes hard within about ...[text shortened]... y to exert control over it, which involves multiple countries all with their own rules.
    State of Maine last year passed legislation bypassing Federal regulations.

    http://www.maine.gov/agriculture/qar/inspection.html

    One lady in a radio interview boasted she knows the cows name that produces the milk her kids drink. Time for each of us to take some personal responsibility for our choices of food.
  6. 12 Feb '13 17:07
    Its a serious business this, and i think heads should role at the regulators, or they better wise up very quick and start testing.. I can't belive the way they say its 'safe' for consumption! your burgers actually 5 squirrels and a chinchilla, but hey its safe to eat!

    I didn't mean to be rude about the smart scots give it aldi, just a bit funny it was quite a brazen campaign.

    but this is a serious business, i shudder to think what they will find when the tests reach donner meat
  7. 12 Feb '13 17:21
    Originally posted by e4chris
    Its a serious business this, and i think heads should role at the regulators, or they better wise up very quick and start testing.. I can't belive the way they say its 'safe' for consumption! your burgers actually 5 squirrels and a chinchilla, but hey its safe to eat!

    I didn't mean to be rude about the smart scots give it aldi, just a bit funny it was ...[text shortened]... a serious business, i shudder to think what they will find when the tests reach donner meat
    There was a Dutch TV show a number of years ago, where they tested the contents of kebab from takeaways which was advertised as lamb. They found various things, such as chicken and turkey, but one of them was a clear winner with 100% pork!
  8. 13 Feb '13 01:48
    i eat ready meals, (with a tomato to make it 'healthy' so i've probably ate some horse...
  9. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    13 Feb '13 10:17
    Originally posted by e4chris
    Lasagna? hmmm...

    I used to be paranoid about food additives, aspartame, sodium benzoate n stuff. So the horse story came as a bit of a surprise, How on earth did that slip by??

    On the news tonight, yes some of us were eating 100% horse.

    I think they might have to drop the 'Smart Scots Give it Aldi' campaign.

    what does this story mean?
    Some Seabiscuit with your tea biscuit, gov'na?
  10. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    13 Feb '13 12:17
    Originally posted by normbenign
    State of Maine last year passed legislation bypassing Federal regulations.

    http://www.maine.gov/agriculture/qar/inspection.html

    One lady in a radio interview boasted she knows the cows name that produces the milk her kids drink. Time for each of us to take some personal responsibility for our choices of food.
    Can they bypass Federal regulations - or did they just add to existing ones? Traceability's important.

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/3b3a2014-7525-11e2-8bc7-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2KbpQH9bw
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21430329

    The the first of these two articles talks about how lots of people are finding themselves unable to maintain their horses and can't sell them to new owners so they are being sent to the knackers yard, or abandoned. This means there's lots of cheap horse-meat floating around. In combination with this the E.U. banned de-sinewed meat a year ago, which caused the producers of "value" products to look for other things to stick in pies and so on; which is what the second article's about. So a glut of cheap horse-meat, a change in regulations and the general financial pressure on companies is enough to generate a food scandal.

    On the whole it could be worse - at least it's not fox (whose population has also jumped recently).
  11. 15 Feb '13 01:17
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    Can they bypass Federal regulations - or did they just add to existing ones? Traceability's important.

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/3b3a2014-7525-11e2-8bc7-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2KbpQH9bw
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21430329

    The the first of these two articles talks about how lots of people are finding themselves unable to maintain ...[text shortened]... le it could be worse - at least it's not fox (whose population has also jumped recently).
    It could be worse.... and it will get worse i bet... have you eaten any do you think?

    a good explanation of how the horse made it into the pie though. I still think this must be criminal, a whole horse must be worth a few hundred pounds, and its not likes its an easy mistake to make at the abatoir.
  12. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    20 Feb '13 17:36
    A horse walked into a bar.

    The barman said: "I'm sorry, we don't serve food."
  13. 21 Feb '13 04:02 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    A horse walked into a bar.

    The barman said: "I'm sorry, we don't serve food."
    that is terrible

    There is a lorry that passes through the town I live carrying battery chickens, you can tell it by stench that follows it down the high street, one day it broke down by my house, stinking the place out, they had to take the covers off to keep the chickens cool, me and a neighbour went out to look, they were rechid, you would not want to eat one (tho i did tonight) thats 'grade a' chicken. Bit off topic, but I was puzzled when they wanted to ban foxhunting why no one mentioned battery farms, it is very cruel, yes it does provide cheap meat but a free range leg is still cheaper then breast meat from them. Shows what companies will do to provide cheap meat...