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Debates Forum

  1. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    26 Jan '11 19:56
    There seems to be a lot of political drama going on up there. Anyone nearby who has any insight? The closest representatives we have (from RHP Debates forum) are in Portugal and southern Africa from what I know. Any insight to share?

    There are massive protests in Egypt, massive food imports in Algeria, political mania and hunting for a fugitive ex-President in Tunisia...

    What's going on up there? Anyone know?
  2. 26 Jan '11 21:14
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    There seems to be a lot of political drama going on up there. Anyone nearby who has any insight? The closest representatives we have (from RHP Debates forum) are in Portugal and southern Africa from what I know. Any insight to share?

    There are massive protests in Egypt, massive food imports in Algeria, political mania and hunting for a fugitive ex-President in Tunisia...

    What's going on up there? Anyone know?
    I spent a year in Asmara, Ethiopia in 1973 so I am an expert.

    Africa is the way it is because, of, well, Africans.

    Any other explanation doesn't make sense. Occam's Razor and all that.
  3. 26 Jan '11 21:22
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    There seems to be a lot of political drama going on up there. Anyone nearby who has any insight? The closest representatives we have (from RHP Debates forum) are in Portugal and southern Africa from what I know. Any insight to share?

    There are massive protests in Egypt, massive food imports in Algeria, political mania and hunting for a fugitive ex-President in Tunisia...

    What's going on up there? Anyone know?
    Increased wealth and communication makes it much harder for dictators to keep their populations under control.
  4. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    26 Jan '11 22:22
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Increased wealth and communication makes it much harder for dictators to keep their populations under control.
    "Increased wealth" for whom? Certainly not the average Tunisian or Egyptian.
  5. 26 Jan '11 22:42 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    "Increased wealth" for whom? Certainly not the average Tunisian or Egyptian.
    Why not? It's not like it was a rose garden during the previous dictators. For example the life expectancy in Tunisia is 74 years.
  6. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    26 Jan '11 22:43 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Why not? It's not like it was a rose garden during the previous dictators.
    Where is this "increased wealth" in those countries that is, according to you, making it "much harder for dictators to keep their populations under control"? The demonstrations/riots in Tunisia that took down their dictatorship was not because of "increased wealth" but because of high unemployment:

    Unemployment is officially around 14 percent but is believed much higher in rural areas and among youths.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/01/10/world/main7233191.shtml
  7. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    26 Jan '11 22:47
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Why not? It's not like it was a rose garden during the previous dictators. For example the life expectancy in Tunisia is 74 years.
    It sounds like you're suggesting peoples' daily needs are being met such that they are healthier, but they haven't accumulated wealth. Is that right?
  8. 26 Jan '11 22:51
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    It sounds like you're suggesting peoples' daily needs are being met such that they are healthier, but they haven't accumulated wealth. Is that right?
    No, that's not what I am suggesting. Many Tunisians can afford computers and mobile phones, which makes it much easier to organize protests and spread dissent, and makes it much harder for the government to cover up corruption and oppression.
  9. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    26 Jan '11 22:53
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    No, that's not what I am suggesting. Many Tunisians can afford computers and mobile phones, which makes it much easier to organize protests and spread dissent, and makes it much harder for the government to cover up corruption and oppression.
    So all the unemployed Tunisians, including the ones in rural areas, got on their computers and mobile phones and organized these demonstrations?

    KN Ivory Tower Land.
  10. 26 Jan '11 22:55
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Where is this "increased wealth" in those countries that is, according to you, making it "much harder for dictators to keep their populations under control"? The demonstrations/riots in Tunisia that took down their dictatorship was not because of "increased wealth" but because of high unemployment:

    Unemployment is officially around 14 p ...[text shortened]... as and among youths.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/01/10/world/main7233191.shtml
    Where did I suggest increased wealth made people want to protest against the government? Why would I make such ludicrous suggestions?
  11. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    26 Jan '11 22:57 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Where did I suggest increased wealth made people want to protest against the government? Why would I make such ludicrous suggestions?
    UMM, a few posts ago:

    Increased wealth and communication makes it much harder for dictators to keep their populations under control.


    Why you make such "ludicrous suggestions" should be between you and a mental health professional.
  12. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    26 Jan '11 23:01
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    No, that's not what I am suggesting. Many Tunisians can afford computers and mobile phones, which makes it much easier to organize protests and spread dissent, and makes it much harder for the government to cover up corruption and oppression.
    This article, though it fawns over the Tunisian' governments moves to increase internet access in its country, concedes that only 13 percent of Tunisian households have a computer. http://www.africa-investor.com/article.asp?id=6931

    One would think that in the households of the unemployed and rural poor the percentage is even lower.
  13. 26 Jan '11 23:02
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    So all the unemployed Tunisians, including the ones in rural areas, got on their computers and mobile phones and organized these demonstrations?

    KN Ivory Tower Land.
    No, they took their spears, put on their warpaint and marched on their armoured camels towards the tent of Ben Ali and his harem.

    Many of the unemployed are college graduates unable to find jobs even with their education. Advanced communication technology enabled the unrest to spread from rural areas quickly.
  14. 26 Jan '11 23:06
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    This article, though it fawns over the Tunisian' governments moves to increase internet access in its country, concedes that only 13 percent of Tunisian households have a computer. http://www.africa-investor.com/article.asp?id=6931

    One would think that in the households of the unemployed and rural poor the percentage is even lower.
    13% doesn't seem like a lot, but if you take into account internet cafés and people who use the computers of friends or family, a large percentage of the (urban) population has access to computers.
  15. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    26 Jan '11 23:14
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    No, they took their spears, put on their warpaint and marched on their armoured camels towards the tent of Ben Ali and his harem.

    Many of the unemployed are college graduates unable to find jobs even with their education. Advanced communication technology enabled the unrest to spread from rural areas quickly.
    Do you have any actual evidence to back up these assertions?