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Debates Forum

  1. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    05 Mar '17 16:27
    Looks like they went badly for the Loyalists and that pro-unification parties now have one more seat then the traditional ruling parties: the DUP and UUP.https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/ng-interactive/2017/mar/03/northern-ireland-assembly-election-latest-results

    It seems to me that the most logical government for the ACLE ("artificially created Loyalist entity" would be one where nationalist Sinn Fein and the SDLP join with Alliance and the smaller liberal parties (which are officially "neutral" on unification); between them they have 50 of the 90 seats. It seems that such an actual coalition of the majority (even though the parties are in general agreement on non-unification issues) is not allowed under Good Friday, however.

    So the most likely result because of those restrictions are a failure of talks between the Loyalist wing and Nationalists and the re-imposition of direct UK rule.

    Most commentary seems to link these results directly to Brexit; any thought from our friends across the pond on that analysis? Is Brexit likely to lead to the unification of Ireland (if the UK will allow it?).
  2. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    05 Mar '17 17:06
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    Looks like they went badly for the Loyalists and that pro-unification parties now have one more seat then the traditional ruling parties: the DUP and UUP.https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/ng-interactive/2017/mar/03/northern-ireland-assembly-election-latest-results

    It seems to me that the most logical government for the ACLE ("artificially created L ...[text shortened]... hat analysis? Is Brexit likely to lead to the unification of Ireland (if the UK will allow it?).
    No.
    And believe me, all electioneering aside... the Republic doesn't want the loyalist problem either.

    Britain spawned a (-nother) monster and any rational human being doesn't want them anywhere close.
  3. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    05 Mar '17 17:10
    Originally posted by shavixmir
    No.
    And believe me, all electioneering aside... the Republic doesn't want the loyalist problem either.

    Britain spawned a (-nother) monster and any rational human being doesn't want them anywhere close.
    The People in the Republic don't seem to agree with you:

    Two out of three people in the Irish Republic would vote for a united Ireland, a major opinion poll has found.

    Pollster Red C said its latest national survey – weeks after the Brexit result – shows a sharp rise in support for reunification since a similar opinion poll six years ago.

    Asked how they would vote if a referendum was held tomorrow, 65 per cent of the sample electorate said they would vote in favour of a united Ireland.

    Some 30 per cent said they would vote against it, while five per cent said they were undecided.

    The findings show an eight per cent jump in support for a united Ireland since Red C posed the same question in a poll carried out for the Sunday Times in 2010.

    http://www.newsletter.co.uk/news/majority-in-the-republic-would-back-irish-reunification-poll-1-7501305
  4. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    05 Mar '17 19:41
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    The People in the Republic don't seem to agree with you:

    Two out of three people in the Irish Republic would vote for a united Ireland, a major opinion poll has found.

    Pollster Red C said its latest national survey – weeks after the Brexit result – shows a sharp rise in support for reunification since a similar opinion poll six years ago.

    Asked ...[text shortened]... www.newsletter.co.uk/news/majority-in-the-republic-would-back-irish-reunification-poll-1-7501305
    They would say that out of
    Solidarity.
    They know they've no say over the matter.

    Ask them: do you want the DUP and the former members of the UDF as a political movement in Ireland...

    Then you'll see what I mean.
  5. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    05 Mar '17 19:54
    Originally posted by shavixmir
    They would say that out of
    Solidarity.
    They know they've no say over the matter.

    Ask them: do you want the DUP and the former members of the UDF as a political movement in Ireland...

    Then you'll see what I mean.
    Obviously the Republic would have a say as to whether they would accept the Six Counties into the Republic; in theory, they could say "no" even if unification won in a vote in the Occupied Territories.

    The DUP would be a minor fringe party in a united Ireland; the Six Counties would have a little over a 1/4 of the total population of Ireland and the DUP only gets 25-30% of the vote even in the North. It's hard to see how a Unionist party would long survive as a political force at all after unification; it's not like it would be reversible. No Unionist parties did so in the Republic after 1921 though certainly there was some Unionist sentiment in the South.