Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Zugzwang
    Joined
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    04 Nov '16 01:421 edit
    Some writers here have been arguing about education in the USA.
    Some writers claim that its quality is affected by how much money is spent on it.
    Other writers claim that cultural issues are much more important than money.

    My point is that cultural issues can influence how money is spent at schools.
    One American town has decided to spent 70 million USD for a new high school football stadium.

    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/nov/03/texas-high-school-football-stadiums

    "Only in Texas: Can $70m on a High School Football Stadium Ever be Justified?"
    --Bryan Kay

    "Local media have called the sprouting of expensive stadiums among
    rival school districts in affluent suburbs an arms race."

    High school football is virtually a civic religion in many places in the USA.
    Many, if not most, Americans want their high school football players to
    have the best of everything--to enjoy every possible competitive advantage).
    (Some American high school football players seem to have access to more
    lavish facilities--such as weight training equipment--than some professional
    athletes in many poorer societies.) Football stars may be treated like demigods--and
    they know it--being granted privileges far beyond those of, say, a science fair winner.
    For male star athletes, one of their expected perks is sexual access to female students.
    There are more than a few cases in which local school authorities reportedly
    have attempted to cover up male star athletes raping or sexually assaulting
    female students These school authorities, if not also most people in their
    communities, apparently believe that it's more important to keep a star athlete
    eligible to play for his school than to hold him responsible for rape or sexual assault.
    Their female victims get the message that they are much less important than popular privileged males.

    Americans may be proud of having the world's best high school (American) football players.
    But what else could these Americans be equally proud of in their high schools?
  2. Joined
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    04 Nov '16 02:11
    Sports facilities are built with money from bonds. This means voters approved the bond which is to be paid back with tax money. It is a local tax passed by an election voted on by the local voters.
  3. Zugzwang
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    04 Nov '16 02:30
    Originally posted by Eladar
    Sports facilities are built with money from bonds. This means voters approved the bond
    which is to be paid back with tax money. It is a local tax passed by an election voted on by the local voters.
    I don't care if most Americans want to pay their high school students to play football.
    How Americans spend their money shows their real priorities.
  4. Joined
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    04 Nov '16 10:20
    Yes that is what I said. They use tax dollars to pay high school football players.

    It isn't what I actually said but if la la land is where you want to be so be it.
  5. Joined
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    05 Nov '16 08:08
    I don't know if football players are any more likely to assault girls/women than other boys, but I haven't yet heard of any school trying to cover up an alleged assault by a chess club star or model train club member.
  6. Behind the scenes
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    05 Nov '16 09:43
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Some writers here have been arguing about education in the USA.
    Some writers claim that its quality is affected by how much money is spent on it.
    Other writers claim that cultural issues are much more important than money.

    My point is that cultural issues can influence how money is spent at schools.
    One American town has decided to spent 70 million U ...[text shortened]... ootball players.
    But what else could these Americans be equally proud of in their high schools?
    I agree 100%. I like sports, but this is money misspent. It's almost as if the institution of high school and college football is a better financed entity than the school itself.
  7. Joined
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    05 Nov '16 14:42
    Originally posted by mchill
    I agree 100%. I like sports, but this is money misspent. It's almost as if the institution of high school and college football is a better financed entity than the school itself.
    I tend to agree but sports do not take away significantly from school money. Most of the extra money sports get is from revenue streams separate from the revenue streams funding the schools.
  8. Zugzwang
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    05 Nov '16 22:23
    Originally posted by mchill
    I agree 100%. I like sports, but this is money misspent. It's almost as if the institution
    of high school and college football is a better financed entity than the school itself.
    My point is that culture influences choices, including how to spend money for schools.
    Evident, many Americans attach more value to a high school's success in football than in other fields.

    I note that objections have been made against high school football on account of the
    health risks, such as concussions. (A few high school students have died on account
    of injuries suffered while playing football.) I also would note that it's extremely unlikely
    that a high school football player could become a professional football player.
    High school football does not prepare its participants--with a few exceptions--for their future.
  9. Zugzwang
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    05 Nov '16 22:301 edit
    Originally posted by Kunsoo
    I don't know if football players are any more likely to assault girls/women than other boys,
    but I haven't yet heard of any school trying to cover up an alleged assault by a chess club star or model train club member.
    For whatever it's worth, his former classmates have said that Donald Trump was a star
    athlete (including in football) at his military high school. They also have said that he
    held deeply sexist attitudes (derived from 'Playboy' magazine) toward women and girls.

    I feel a bit sorry for a high school football star whose 'best years in life' were his short-lived
    period of fame as a high school football star. He may enjoy the fawning adulation of
    adults, the newspapers' flattering headlines, the 'under-the-table' favors of athletic boosters,
    not to mention his expected perk of the sexual conquests of pretty cheerleaders.

    But after all the cheering has stopped and the newspapers are used to wrap fish,
    what does he have left if he has not bothered to obtain a decent education?
    A lifetime of reliving his increasingly distant glory on the football field?
  10. Joined
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    05 Nov '16 22:53
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    For whatever it's worth, his former classmates have said that Donald Trump was a star
    athlete (including in football) at his military high school. They also have said that he
    held deeply sexist attitudes (derived from 'Playboy' magazine) toward women and girls.

    I feel a bit sorry for a high school football star whose 'best years in life' were his sho ...[text shortened]... decent education?
    A lifetime of reliving his increasingly distant glory on the football field?
    The Russians made him play football. LOL Duchess you are so Hillaryass. LOL
  11. SubscriberSuzianne
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    05 Nov '16 23:181 edit
    Originally posted by Eladar
    Sports facilities [at schools] are built with money from bonds. This means voters approved the bond which is to be paid back with tax money. It is a local tax passed by an election voted on by the local voters.
    Another Republican 'kick the can down the road' idea because "we can't bear to actually be taxed according to how much we make and pay our share to educate our kids, because I already pay out the ass to send my own brat to private school. In fact, what the hell am I doing? I should be able to get you to pay for MY kid, too." And charter schools were born.

    These bonds do not manufacture money from thin air. They are paid for by everyone in higher property taxes. More Republicans shoving a "flat-tax" down our throats so that we end up paying for their kids to go to private school.
  12. Joined
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    05 Nov '16 23:26
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    My point is that culture influences choices, including how to spend money for schools.
    Evident, many Americans attach more value to a high school's success in football than in other fields.

    I note that objections have been made against high school football on account of the
    health risks, such as concussions. (A few high school students have died on ...[text shortened]... High school football does not prepare its participants--with a few exceptions--for their future.
    The concussion issue and the NFL's sleezy response to it, are a couple of reasons I really have no interest in watching the sport anymore. Other sports have injury risks, but to not have serious head and neurological issues later in life is the exception among football players, not the rule.

    I played soccer and tennis. Strained a hamstring once, but otherwise was pretty lucky.

    I enjoyed watching football on television in high school because I enjoyed getting stoned and tripping out on the slow motion replays. But knowing these guys are going to suffer problems for the rest of their lives takes the pleasure out of it - even if I still smoked weed.
  13. Standard membersh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
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    06 Nov '16 00:05
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Some writers here have been arguing about education in the USA.
    Some writers claim that its quality is affected by how much money is spent on it.
    Other writers claim that cultural issues are much more important than money.

    My point is that cultural issues can influence how money is spent at schools.
    One American town has decided to spent 70 million U ...[text shortened]... ootball players.
    But what else could these Americans be equally proud of in their high schools?
    $70 million certainly sounds extremely excessive, but investments in general in stadiums often pay for themselves in seats and luxury boxes for which members of the public pay high prices.
  14. Joined
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    06 Nov '16 00:13
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Another Republican 'kick the can down the road' idea because "we can't bear to actually be taxed according to how much we make and pay our share to educate our kids, because I already pay out the ass to send my own brat to private school. In fact, what the hell am I doing? I should be able to get you to pay for MY kid, too." And charter schools were born ...[text shortened]... g a "flat-tax" down our throats so that we end up paying for their kids to go to private school.
    Yes I guess voting to increase taxes at the local level to be spent for specfic projects is a Republican trick.
  15. Subscriberno1marauder
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    06 Nov '16 02:021 edit
    Originally posted by sh76
    $70 million certainly sounds extremely excessive, but investments in general in stadiums often pay for themselves in seats and luxury boxes for which members of the public pay high prices.
    At a high school?

    Pretty unlikely. According to the article, the stadium will only seat 12,000.
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