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  1. 15 Sep '12 12:36 / 1 edit
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/13/world/europe/russians-say-anti-american-attack-in-libya-vindicates-their-position.html

    "Upon learning of the violent death of the US ambassador to Libya on Wednesday, many Russians responded with variations on "I told you so".

    Russia has long argued that the West should not support popular uprisings against dictatorships in the Middle East lest Islamic fundamentalism take hold. Vladimir PUtin, then serving as prime minister, was especially enraged last fall after an angry crowd killed his ally, Qaddafi, and event he later condemned as a "repulsive, disgusting" scene. Since then, Russia has blocked Western initiatives to force Syria's president, Bashar al-Assad, from power despite a bloody crackdown on the opposition. Russians' responses to the storming of the American Consulate in Beghazi underlined the deep policy divide. A prime-time news report pointedly juxtaposed images of Ambassador Steven's death with Qaddafi's pointing at their similarities, then cut to footage of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton reacting to the Libyan leader's death with a cursory "wow".

    Deputy Foreign Minister Mikhail Margelov said that positions had been stoked by the uprisings and that they "splash out in the form of terrorist acts or measures of nonbeleivers or an attack on embassies and consulates".

    "The frequency of these outburts, unfortunately, has been growing since the "Arab Spring" brought to power political groups of Islamic orientation to the Interfax news agency. A telegram from Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov to Mrs. Clinton condemned the attack as a crime, and said "it confirms once again the necessity of combining the forces of our countries and the whole international community to fight with the evils of terrorism."

    But many commentators were far less diplomatic, especially on social media. The first commentaries on Twitter were bitingly sarcastic -- "The democratized residents of Libya thanked the staff of the American Embassy for its support," one read. Another read, "This is what you call exporting democracy, it seems. America gives Libya a revolution, and Libyans, in return, kill the ambassador." Aleksei Pushlov, the head of Russia's parlimentary Foreign Affairs Committee, wrote via Twitter: "Under Qaddafi they did not kill diplomats. Obama and Clinton are in shock? What did they expect -- "Democracy?" Even bigger surpises await them in Syria."

    Yevgeny Satanovsky, president of the Institute of the MIddle East in Moscow, said American leaders should not expect "one word of sympathy" from their Russian counterparts. "It is a tragedy to the family of the poor ambassador, but his blood is on the hands of Hillary Clinton personally and Barak Obama personally," Mr. Satanovsky said. He said Russian warnings against intervention in the Middle East came from the bitter experience of the Soviets in Afghanistan.

    "You are the Soviet Union now, guys, and you pay the price," he said. "You are trying to distribute democracy the way we used to distribute socialism. You do it the Western way. They hate both." He said dictators were preferable to the constellation of armed forces that emerges when they are unseated."

    Mr. Putin has dug his heels in on the issue of Syria, frustrating Western hopes that he could persuade Mr. Assad to leave his post voluntarily. Fyodor Lukyanov, a respected analyst and editor of Russia in Global Affairs, said violence like Tuesday's had been at the heart of Russia's warnings. He said Russia had formulated a "post-Communist position: If you try to impose anything on others, as the Soviet Union tried to do, the result will be the opposite, and disastrous."
  2. 16 Sep '12 06:46
    Originally posted by whodey
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/13/world/europe/russians-say-anti-american-attack-in-libya-vindicates-their-position.html

    "Upon learning of the violent death of the US ambassador to Libya on Wednesday, many Russians responded with variations on "I told you so".

    Russia has long argued that the West should not support popular uprisings against dictatorship ...[text shortened]... o do, the result will be the opposite, and disastrous."
    Fair enough, we all sit back & let Assad & all the other despots in this world carry on murdering their own people, for nothing other than sport.

    Middle East crisis been a long time coming - lets thank the Internet for that, pity Iranian poeple failed to over throw their leadership but hey the ball is rolling now.

    These nations have never know democracy & I agree with the Russian take on interfering here, but the common people want more than they have. The Internet has shown them a world outside there boarders so Despots reap the whirl wind now.
  3. 16 Sep '12 11:26
    Originally posted by whodey
    He said Russia had formulated a "post-Communist position: If you try to impose anything on others, as the Soviet Union tried to do, the result will be the opposite, and disastrous."
    Like Russia's not still trying to "impose things" on countries like the Ukraine, Georgia, etc?
  4. 16 Sep '12 18:23
    Originally posted by Teinosuke
    Like Russia's not still trying to "impose things" on countries like the Ukraine, Georgia, etc?
    Everyone is trying to impose their will on others it seems. However, to not own up to the reprocussions is just chicken poo.

    Here is another angle from an American perspective from Ron Paul.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBJY5WHfq4E
  5. 16 Sep '12 18:25
    Originally posted by Hells Caretaker
    Fair enough, we all sit back & let Assad & all the other despots in this world carry on murdering their own people, for nothing other than sport.

    Middle East crisis been a long time coming - lets thank the Internet for that, pity Iranian poeple failed to over throw their leadership but hey the ball is rolling now.

    These nations have never know ...[text shortened]... . The Internet has shown them a world outside there boarders so Despots reap the whirl wind now.
    Ancient Greece felt the same way. Then they tried to export their democracy to Sparta which only resulted in a bitter long war that bankrupted them and ended their prosperity.