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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Subscriber FMF
    Main Poster
    14 Feb '10 02:59
    From the Washington Post: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/12/AR2010021204911.html?hpid=moreheadlines

    The case against Saeed Mohammed Saleh Hatim seemed ironclad.

    The Justice Department alleged that Hatim, a detainee at the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, trained at an al-Qaeda military camp in Afghanistan, stayed at terrorist guesthouses and even fought in the battle of Tora Bora. . . .

    But a federal judge reviewed the case and found the government's evidence too weak to justify Hatim's confinement. The judge ordered the detainee's release, ruling that he could not rely on Hatim's statements because they had been coerced. He also found that the government's informer was "profoundly unreliable."


    Isn't this a victory for the U.S. judicial system and a restoration of American values?
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    West Coast Represent
    14 Feb '10 03:05
    Originally posted by FMF
    From the Washington Post: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/12/AR2010021204911.html?hpid=moreheadlines

    [quote]The case against Saeed Mohammed Saleh Hatim seemed ironclad.

    The Justice Department alleged that Hatim, a detainee at the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, trained at an al-Qaeda military camp in Afghanistan, ...[text shortened]...
    Isn't this a victory for the U.S. judicial system and a restoration of American values?
    It is a victory and a demonstration of US values. Not a "restoration".
  3. Subscriber FMF
    Main Poster
    14 Feb '10 03:11
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    It is a victory and a demonstration of US values. Not a "restoration".
    So you are denying that Guantanamo Bay and the military tribunals and the 'evidence' obtained through torture diminished U.S. jurisprudence? Were they a victory and a demonstration of US values too? I think the word "restoration" is very apt. On what grounds do you quibble it?
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    West Coast Represent
    14 Feb '10 03:17
    Originally posted by FMF
    So you are denying that Guantanamo Bay and the military tribunals and the 'evidence' obtained through torture diminished U.S. jurisprudence? Were they a victory and a demonstration of US values too? I think the word "restoration" is very apt. On what grounds do you quibble it?
    The judge was a check and balance to all that.
  5. Subscriber FMF
    Main Poster
    14 Feb '10 03:20
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    The judge was a check and balance to all that.
    In light of what has happened in the last 8 or so years, on what grounds do you quibble my use of the word "restoration" in the OP?
  6. Standard member shavixmir
    Guppy poo
    14 Feb '10 07:15
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    It is a victory and a demonstration of US values. Not a "restoration".
    You mean setting an innocent man free after illegally holding him captive for God knows how many years? And torturing him?

    Gotta love those values!
  7. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    West Coast Represent
    14 Feb '10 08:42
    Originally posted by FMF
    In light of what has happened in the last 8 or so years, on what grounds do you quibble my use of the word "restoration" in the OP?
    This isn't a battle I want to fight. You may be right. I'll back down.
  8. 15 Feb '10 01:50
    Originally posted by shavixmir
    You mean setting an innocent man free after illegally holding him captive for God knows how many years? And torturing him?

    Gotta love those values!
    Yes, I do