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Debates Forum

  1. 17 Jul '10 03:48
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100715/ap_on_sc/us_sci_hot_month

    Paul, 2 hours ago

    I live in Los Angeles and we had the COLDEST June on record. I had to ware a winter jacket at night.
  2. 17 Jul '10 03:48
    is Paul full of it?
  3. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    17 Jul '10 04:05
    June was very pleasant. July is getting hot.
  4. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    17 Jul '10 04:53 / 1 edit
    The proliferation of weather records in a relatively short space of recent time - THE coldest, wettest, longest, driest, hottest, deadliest... - would seem to suggest that something is amiss with the climate patterns we once knew.
  5. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    17 Jul '10 04:54
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    is Paul full of it?
    Invite Paul to RHP and he can argue his corner.
  6. 17 Jul '10 09:53
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100715/ap_on_sc/us_sci_hot_month

    Paul, 2 hours ago

    I live in Los Angeles and we had the COLDEST June on record. I had to ware a winter jacket at night.
    Paul was drawing on the sum total of climate data gathered from the whole world. Zeeblebot is drawing on his anecdotal experience of one American city.

    Which perception is more likely to be scientifically meaningful?
  7. 17 Jul '10 10:39 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FMF
    The proliferation of weather records in a relatively short space of recent time - THE coldest, wettest, longest, driest, hottest, deadliest... - would seem to suggest that something is amiss with the climate patterns we once knew.
    Or, it could just be that our record keeping is getting better, or simply that we haven't been keeping records for very long.
    In places that haven't kept records for more than 50 years or so, you would expect a warmest / hottest / coldest/ wettest/ driest etc year within the next 10 years or so.
    Would anyone care to calculate the actual probability?
    In places where records have been kept longer, they simply report it as "the ..... est year / month in the last x years".
    If you think about it, these events should statistically happen in various places on the globe hundreds of times a year.
    What is changing is the fact that they are being reported more often.

    I am not saying nothings amiss with the climate, but I am saying that listening to weather reports and sensationalist news isn't going to tell you whether or not that is the case.