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  1. 30 Apr '16 19:16 / 1 edit
    http://www.fi.uu.nl/publicaties/literatuur/6320.pdf

    The analysis of the two groups of extreme items made it clear that there were
    very distinct differences between the girls’ problems and the boys’ problems.
    The girls performed equally as well as the boys or a little bit better on:
    – problems which ask for accuracy,
    – problems of which the text is complex,
    – problems which ask for (refl ection on) strategies and not for calculations,
    – well-known problems which refer to standard procedures,
    – straight-away problems (in which the operation and the numbers are given
    and no re-organisation is necessary), and
    – problems which refer to shopping situations.
    An example of such a girls’ problem is the Camera problem2
    , found with the other
    problems in the Activities section.This problem is about a boy who wants to buy
    a camera. The test sheet contains a lot of text that tells the students the amounts
    of money the boy has saved in four subsequent months. The students have to calculate
    what is the shortage for buying the camera. The difference in p-value of
    this problem was -.04, meaning that the difference was in favour of the girls.
    On the other hand, the boys perform clearly better than the girls on:
    – problems which ask for daily-life knowledge on numbers and measures,
    – problems in which large numbers with many zeros are used,
    – problems in which different numbers or different units of measurement are
    used,
    2
    Cito Test 1995 – Part 1, Item 16; p-value boys = .76, p-value girls = .80.
    242 International Perspectives on Learning and Teaching Mathematics
    MARJA VAN DEN HEUVEL-PANHUIZEN Girls’ and Boys’ Problems
    – problems which have possibilities for ”tinkering” with numbers 3
    , and
    – problems which ask for reasoning backwards.



    If you want girls to have as good or better results in math, just reform math and ask the right kinds of math questions. Do away with computation by all means.
  2. 30 Apr '16 20:23
    Originally posted by Eladar
    http://www.fi.uu.nl/publicaties/literatuur/6320.pdf

    [b]The analysis of the two groups of extreme items made it clear that there were
    very distinct differences between the girls’ problems and the boys’ problems.
    The girls performed equally as well as the boys or a little bit better on:
    – problems which ask for accuracy,
    – problems of which the text is c ...[text shortened]... t reform math and ask the right kinds of math questions. Do away with computation by all means.
    When I was a mathematics student, I did *not* notice any textbooks segregated by gender.
  3. 30 Apr '16 20:27
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    When I was a mathematics student, I did *not* notice any textbooks segregated by gender.
    You really are quite dense.

    All you need to do is ask the right kinds of questions in the right format for girls to perform better in math. I notice much of the reform movement in the US is aimed at asking more female friendly questions and avoiding the ones at which girls struggle.
  4. 30 Apr '16 20:43 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Eladar
    You really are quite dense.

    All you need to do is ask the right kinds of questions in the right format for girls to
    perform better in math. I notice much of the reform movement in the US is aimed at
    asking more female friendly questions and avoiding the ones at which girls struggle.
    When I was winning mathematical problem-solving competitions, I did not notice anyone being
    given 'female friendly' (or 'male friendly' ) problems. Everyone was given the same problems.
    I have no experience of being a mathematics student in the United States today.

    Does Eladar believe that a male-to-female transgender student should be given 'female friendly'
    or 'male friendly' (sarcasm) mathematics problems to solve? What about 'black friendly'
    or 'white friendly' problems? Are all mathematics problems considered 'Asian friendly'?

    I believe that every student should be given the same problems. *If* research finds that
    female students tend to learn better when taught differently from male students, however,
    then why not try teaching female students differently in general and see what happens?
  5. 30 Apr '16 20:47
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    When I was winning mathematical problem-solving competitions, I did not notice anyone being
    given 'female friendly' (or 'male friendly' ) problems. Everyone was given the same problems.
    I have no experience of being a mathematics student in the United States today.

    Does Eladar believe that a male-to-female transgender student should be given 'female ...[text shortened]... endly'
    or 'white friendly' problems? Are all mathematics problems considered 'Asian friendly'?
    At the time did you even know what kinds of questions are male or female friendly?
  6. 30 Apr '16 20:51
    Originally posted by Eladar
    At the time did you even know what kinds of questions are male or female friendly?
    It never occurred to me because male and female students always were given the same problems.
    At that time, there also were no separate mathematical problem-solving competitions for female students.
  7. 30 Apr '16 21:02
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    It never occurred to me because male and female students always were given the same problems.
    At that time, there also were no separate mathematical problem-solving competitions for female students.
    Try reading the original post and see if you can understand the topic.
  8. 30 Apr '16 22:53
    Originally posted by Eladar
    http://www.fi.uu.nl/publicaties/literatuur/6320.pdf

    [b]The analysis of the two groups of extreme items made it clear that there were
    very distinct differences between the girls’ problems and the boys’ problems.
    The girls performed equally as well as the boys or a little bit better on:
    – problems which ask for accuracy,
    – problems of which the text is c ...[text shortened]... t reform math and ask the right kinds of math questions. Do away with computation by all means.
    Doesn't this vary with the age of the subjects?
  9. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    01 May '16 00:57
    Originally posted by Eladar
    .

    All you need to do is ask the right kinds of questions in the right format for girls to perform better in math. I notice much of the reform movement in the US is aimed at asking more female friendly questions and avoiding the ones at which girls struggle.
    You really are quite dense.

    All you need to do is ask the right kinds of questions in
    the right format for boys to continue to perform better in math.
  10. 01 May '16 15:57
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Doesn't this vary with the age of the subjects?
    Perhaps you can site a study that says it does.
  11. 01 May '16 16:00
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    You really are quite dense.

    All you need to do is ask the right kinds of questions in
    the right format for boys to continue to perform better in math.
    I suppose it is really not fair to include mathematical computations when one defines the field of math. I guess it makes people like you feel better about girls doing as well as guys in the field of math, even if the tests are being rigged specifically to get better results for females.
  12. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    01 May '16 21:53
    Originally posted by Eladar
    I suppose it is really not fair to include mathematical computations when one defines the field of math. I guess it makes people like you feel better about girls doing as well as guys in the field of math, even if the tests are being rigged specifically to get better results for females.
    Your own posts implies current tests are rigged in favour of boys.
    Get a grip!
  13. 01 May '16 23:29
    Originally posted by Eladar
    Perhaps you can site a study that says it does.
    Everything I've ever read indicates that boys develop later than girls, and often surpass the girls in some areas.
  14. 01 May '16 23:31
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    Your own posts implies current tests are rigged in favour of boys.
    Get a grip!
    I suspect the tests, if they are rigged, are rigged in favor of the education establishment. Public education is a cash cow, funded by money arbitrarily taken from taxpayers, many of whom have no children.
  15. 02 May '16 22:51
    Here you go Norm:

    http://educationnext.org/gender-gap/


    One explanation that comes to mind is which test is being used to determine math achievement. I know that Oklahoma's math tests are much different than the ACT or the SAT. One glaring weakness of the Oklahoma Geometry test is that all figures are drawn to scale. ACT nor SAT math sections have pictures drawn to scale.