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Debates Forum

  1. 11 Oct '15 15:09
    "When the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation pledged $1.5 million to Florida State University’s economics department, for example, it stipulated that a Koch-appointed advisory committee would select professors and undertake annual evaluations.

    "The Koch brothers now fund 350 programs at over 250 colleges and universities across America. You can bet that funding doesn’t underwrite research on inequality and environmental justice."

    http://www.nvdaily.com/opinion/2015/10/robert-b-reich-bernie-sanders-and-the-free-market/
  2. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    11 Oct '15 15:48
    Originally posted by JS357
    "When the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation pledged $1.5 million to Florida State University’s economics department, for example, it stipulated that a Koch-appointed advisory committee would select professors and undertake annual evaluations.

    "The Koch brothers now fund 350 programs at over 250 colleges and universities across America. You can bet that ...[text shortened]... e."

    http://www.nvdaily.com/opinion/2015/10/robert-b-reich-bernie-sanders-and-the-free-market/
    This may indeed be correct, I don't know. I do know that America spends far more on each student than many other nations, yet produces rather poorly educated students. I'm not blaming any one group for this, but I do know America would be wise to look offshore to Canada, Europe, Asia, or some other education model before pouring more resources into the dysfunctional one that we have now.
  3. 11 Oct '15 16:03 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by bill718
    This may indeed be correct, I don't know. I do know that America spends far more on each student than many other nations, yet produces rather poorly educated students. I'm not blaming any one group for this, but I do know America would be wise to look offshore to Canada, Europe, Asia, or some other education model before pouring more resources into the dysfunctional one that we have now.
    It's curious, though, how many foreign students seek education at such places as UC Berkeley, and then return to their home countries.

    http://internationaloffice.berkeley.edu/students/current/enrollment_data
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    11 Oct '15 20:42 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by JS357
    It's curious, though, how many foreign students seek education at such places as UC Berkeley, and then return to their home countries.

    http://internationaloffice.berkeley.edu/students/current/enrollment_data
    I knew a Chinese girl at Berkeley. She said she liked China better than the USA. She played a lot of Starcraft and called the Carriers "big fat airplanes".
  5. 11 Oct '15 21:16 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    I knew a Chinese girl at Berkeley. She said she liked China better than the USA. She played a lot of Starcraft and called the Carriers "big fat airplanes".
    She must really like polluted air and water if she prefers China.
    Is she going back soon?

    http://www.cnbc.com/2015/08/18/china-air-pollution-far-worse-than-thought-study.html
  6. 11 Oct '15 21:24
    Originally posted by FishHead111
    I hear that occasionally from people from other countries, they say how much they like where they came from better than the US.
    Funny how they don't usually go back, isn't it?
    More and more Chinese and South Asians are going back now after getting their degrees because there are more engineering jobs there, working for companies that make high tech goods for the US market. It's called reverse brain drain.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverse_brain_drain

    "China has generally been seen as a developing country, and they have impacted by brain drain through the migration of their talented minds to the developed world. What has assisted China in the flow of return migration is through central government policies. These policies are changes in the domestic environment, the freedom to immigrate and emigrate freely, political stability, and changes in how the government uses people.[11] In addition, the local government was involved in the enhancement of return migration by cities rewarding the returnees with large bonuses from their home unit.[12] There are also other reasons which encouraged the migration back to the home country, which were higher social status in China, better carrier opportunities in China, and patriotism.[13]

    In addition, competition among universities, research laboratories and enterprises has given the returning intellectual elites excellent incentives. For example, in the new life science school at Beijing’s Tsinghua University, they were able to recruit many Chinese scientists who were previously in more developed countries like the United States due to China’s booming economy, large government investment in research, and the chance to build a science program from the ground up.[14]

    Besides the government policies and economic reasons for returning to China, certain family factors influenced the decision to return, some of the reasons where parental views about returning, concerns for children, and the attitude of one’s spouse about returning.[15]"

    "India is one of the first countries where the phenomenon of reverse brain drain occurred. Previously, India was well known for being the country where numerous information technology students left for America for a better education and greater employment opportunities. The turning point was during the dot-com bubble. During this period many information technology experts were forced to return to India due to the slump and the loss of jobs in the United States.[16]

    Previously, the Indian Government was unhappy of the occurrence of brain drain. Tens of thousands of migrants who had initially come to the U.S. for graduate engineering education, accepted jobs in Silicon Valley rather than return to their home countries, where professional opportunities were limited.[17]

    Besides the dot-com bubble crisis, the economic and employment opportunities that existed back home; interested many Indian entrepreneurs to improve the economic development in the home country, which increased the number of returning intelligentsias to India.[17]

    In addition, other reasons for the returning migration of the Indian high skill workers was due to their desires to return to their roots, a more family oriented lifestyle, and also security concerns in the post 9/11 period where Indians were discriminated against because they were often mistaken for Arabs. [18]"
  7. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's only business
    11 Oct '15 21:25
    Originally posted by FishHead111
    She must really like polluted air and water if she prefers China.
    Is she going back soon?

    http://www.cnbc.com/2015/08/18/china-air-pollution-far-worse-than-thought-study.html
    I didn't know her very well. I assume she went back after she graduated.
  8. 11 Oct '15 21:29
    Originally posted by JS357
    More and more Chinese and South Asians are going back now after getting their degrees because there are more engineering jobs there, working for companies that make high tech goods for the US market. It's called reverse brain drain.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverse_brain_drain

    "China has generally been seen as a developing country, and they have imp ...[text shortened]... eriod where Indians were discriminated against because they were often mistaken for Arabs. [18]"
    But....I thought American education sucked compared to other countries?
  9. 11 Oct '15 21:50
    Originally posted by FishHead111
    But....I thought American education sucked compared to other countries?
    Go back a few posts in this thread and you'll see me questioning that thought. At least for higher education.
  10. 13 Oct '15 16:18
    Originally posted by JS357
    "When the Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation pledged $1.5 million to Florida State University’s economics department, for example, it stipulated that a Koch-appointed advisory committee would select professors and undertake annual evaluations.

    "The Koch brothers now fund 350 programs at over 250 colleges and universities across America. You can bet that ...[text shortened]... e."

    http://www.nvdaily.com/opinion/2015/10/robert-b-reich-bernie-sanders-and-the-free-market/
    If you had made billions of dollars, would you contribute to causes that were opposed to your views?
  11. 13 Oct '15 16:22
    Originally posted by JS357
    It's curious, though, how many foreign students seek education at such places as UC Berkeley, and then return to their home countries.

    http://internationaloffice.berkeley.edu/students/current/enrollment_data
    I believe that the under performance of both Americas k-12 and universities has a lot more to do with a cultural sense of entitlement, that the institutions themselves.

    Foreign students even excel in the K-12 system as well, many coming here without an ability to speak or read American English.
  12. 13 Oct '15 16:49
    Originally posted by normbenign
    If you had made billions of dollars, would you contribute to causes that were opposed to your views?
    It's understandable but as a general rule ability to act does not justify the act.
  13. 13 Oct '15 17:30
    Originally posted by JS357
    It's understandable but as a general rule ability to act does not justify the act.
    True, but it doesn't condemn the act either. There are rich people who are benevolent to leftist institutions as well. We all tend to support what we believe, and have the right to do so.
  14. 13 Oct '15 22:57
    Originally posted by normbenign
    True, but it doesn't condemn the act either. There are rich people who are benevolent to leftist institutions as well. We all tend to support what we believe, and have the right to do so.
    This situation goes further than contributing to a "leftist [or rightist] institution." It gives the donor control of the curriculum that its donations fund. Granted, it happens on both sides. I don't like either side doing it, especially in a land grant state university. It lends the slanted curriculum an air of official approval. Privately funded U's are a different matter.