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General Forum

  1. Joined
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    29 Dec '13 17:47
    Google on those three words and you get a tool for looking at the frequency of specific words in books from 1800 to 2000. More than one word can be graphed. For example, "liberty" and "security" are interesting because the graph shows that liberty was more frequently talked about in 1800 and for some time after, but security gets more mentions in recent history. How about "chess"?
  2. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
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    30 Dec '13 16:50
    Originally posted by JS357
    Google on those three words and you get a tool for looking at the frequency of specific words in books from 1800 to 2000. More than one word can be graphed. For example, "liberty" and "security" are interesting because the graph shows that liberty was more frequently talked about in 1800 and for some time after, but security gets more mentions in recent history. How about "chess"?
    Would that be only the English language? I assume so, but did they take into account the fact we are pushing 8 billion population now? I would imagine, for instance, there are probably more English speakers in India than in the US. Just a guess. With such a large increase in population, it would seem to skew the results unless you factored that in.
  3. Joined
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    30 Dec '13 17:01
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I would imagine, for instance, there are probably more English speakers in India than in the US. Just a guess.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_English-speaking_population

    Not a terrible guess but still only about a third.
  4. Joined
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    30 Dec '13 17:11
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Would that be only the English language? I assume so, but did they take into account the fact we are pushing 8 billion population now? I would imagine, for instance, there are probably more English speakers in India than in the US. Just a guess. With such a large increase in population, it would seem to skew the results unless you factored that in.
    After spending 5 1/2 months in India I highly doubt that.
  5. Joined
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    30 Dec '13 17:561 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Would that be only the English language? I assume so, but did they take into account the fact we are pushing 8 billion population now? I would imagine, for instance, there are probably more English speakers in India than in the US. Just a guess. With such a large increase in population, it would seem to skew the results unless you factored that in.
    Numerous language choices covering the majority of world population. I don't know the size of the corpus in each language.

    https://books.google.com/ngrams

    Eg, look up lebensraum in German.
  6. Standard memberFrank Burns
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    30 Dec '13 23:371 edit
    I checked the word chess. A big spike between 1800 - 1810 followed by a sharp drop. Then a fairly steady climb for the rest of the graph. Indicative of?
  7. Standard memberFrank Burns
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    31 Dec '13 22:584 edits
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I would imagine that there are probably more people who speak English properly and correctly in India than in the US. Just a guess.

    There, I fixed it.
    As a citizen of the US I offer this from my personal experience.
    ~P(for a day)
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