General Forum

General Forum

  1. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    USA
    Joined
    14 Jul '07
    Moves
    43012
    26 Sep '13 17:171 edit
    "Internet Etiquette - 10 Rules of Netiquette" By Kim Tranter

    "Okay, so the internet police won’t come and get you and the bush people aren’t peeking in your windows with binoculars, but there definitely are some great rules for internet etiquette that will make your online experience more enjoyable.

    1. When typing never write in all capital letters. That is shouting. People don’t like it when you shout at them in person. And they sure don’t like when you shout at them on the net!

    2. Don’t plagiarize. Someone spent a long time coming up with their content. When you borrow something from someone, give them the credit. Site their name or their site. Give the site when you have gotten your information.

    3. Use proper quotes and always use the whole quote. Don’t take quotes out of context and don’t be selective about which part of the quote you want to use.

    4. Don’t gossip and keep personal information personal. Don’t tell stories that you don’t know for a fact to be true. And often, just because it’s true, doesn’t mean that it needs to be repeated.

    5. Don’t steal those photographs off the web even if they are a perfect fit for what you need. Chances are they are copyrighted and someone spent a long time putting that together. Get permission and give credit where credit is due.

    6. Watch your language. No potty mouths.

    7. Be patient with internet newbies. Know that they are just learning like you did once upon a time.

    8. No spamming. Remember that spam is unwanted electronic messages or sending the same electronic message over and over. This can get you in a lot of trouble on some sites and as a general rule it just irritates everyone else.

    9. If you are using a header (such as in an email) make sure your content really pertains to the header. You must admit it would really stink if the header said something about football, for example, and the email was really about your newest and greatest business idea. Just stay on topic and the problem is solved.

    10. Avoid overuse of emoticons. You know… those cute little smiley faces. They really lose their cuteness when overused and tend to irritate people.

    Following these simple guidelines will keep your internet connections happy and allow for more “social” interactions. Just like in face to face dealings, internet users love other users with manners. Manners go a long way in saying who you are and what you are."
    .
    http://www.uticaod.com/blogs/socialmedia/x1177024386/Internet-Etiquette-10-Rules-of-Netiquette

    11. ?

    12. ¿
  2. In your face
    Joined
    21 Aug '04
    Moves
    55993
    26 Sep '13 22:182 edits
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    [b]"Internet Etiquette - 10 Rules of Netiquette" By Kim Tranter

    "Okay, so the internet police won’t come and get you and the bush people aren’t peeking in your windows with binoculars, but there definitely are some great rules for internet etiquette that will make your online experience more enjoyable.

    1. When typing never write in al ...[text shortened]... od.com/blogs/socialmedia/x1177024386/Internet-Etiquette-10-Rules-of-Netiquette

    11. ?

    12. ¿[/b]
    1. WHAT?
    2. Who was the second person to use the word plagiarise?
    3. '
    4. Did she now? Well I never!
    5.
    _________
    | _______ |
    / \ \
    /___\_________\
    | | \ |
    | | \ |
    | | \ |
    | | M \ |
    | | \ |
    | |\ I \ |
    | | \ \ |
    | | \ L \|
    | | \ |
    | | \ K |
    | | \ |
    | | \ |
    |___|_______\_|

    6. [automdded by robomod]
    7. I will cut you more slack in future.
    8. Come on Bobs. How can you say this?
    9. Erm.
    10. 😛
  3. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    USA
    Joined
    14 Jul '07
    Moves
    43012
    26 Sep '13 23:27
    Originally posted by Sicilian Sausage
    1. WHAT?
    2. Who was the second person to use the word plagiarise?
    3. '
    4. Did she now? Well I never!
    5.
    _________
    | _______ |
    / \ \
    /___\_________\
    | | \ |
    | | \ |
    | | \ |
    | | M \ |
    | | \ |
    | |\ I \ |
    | | \ \ |
    | | \ L \|
    | | ...[text shortened]... ll cut you more slack in future.
    8. Come on Bobs. How can you say this?
    9. Erm.
    10. 😛
    11. Trolls: "What is a Troll? An Internet "troll" is a person who delights in sowing discord on the Internet. He (and it is usually he) tries to start arguments and upset people.

    Trolls see Internet communications services as convenient venues for their bizarre game. For some reason, they don't "get" that they are hurting real people. To them, other Internet users are not quite human but are a kind of digital abstraction. As a result, they feel no sorrow whatsoever for the pain they inflict. Indeed, the greater the suffering they cause, the greater their 'achievement' (as they see it). At the moment, the relative anonymity of the net allows trolls to flourish.

    Trolls are utterly impervious to criticism (constructive or otherwise). You cannot negotiate with them; you cannot cause them to feel shame or compassion; you cannot reason with them. They cannot be made to feel remorse. For some reason, trolls do not feel they are bound by the rules of courtesy or social responsibility.

    Perhaps this sounds inconceivable. You may think, "Surely there is something I can write that will change them." But a true troll can not be changed by mere words...."

    http://web.archive.org/web/20060428091222/http://members.aol.com/intwg/trolls.htm

    There's more.
  4. In your face
    Joined
    21 Aug '04
    Moves
    55993
    26 Sep '13 23:37
    Look no further than yourself Mr Blobby - King of all trolls.
  5. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    USA
    Joined
    14 Jul '07
    Moves
    43012
    26 Sep '13 23:47
    "What Can be Done about Trolls?"

    "When you suspect that somebody is a troll, you might try responding with a polite, mild message to see if it's just somebody in a bad mood. Internet users sometimes let their passions get away from them when seated safely behind their keyboard. If you ignore their bluster and respond in a pleasant manner, they usually calm down. However, if the person persists in being beastly, and seems to enjoy being unpleasant, the only effective position is summed up as follows: The only way to deal with trolls is to limit your reaction to reminding others not to respond to trolls. When you try to reason with a troll, he wins. When you insult a troll, he wins. When you scream at a troll, he wins. Reveal Hidden Content
    The only thing that trolls cannot handle is being ignored.


    "What Not to Do"

    "As already stated, it is futile to try to "cure" a troll of his obsession. But perhaps you simply cannot bear the hostile environment that the troll is creating and want to go away for a while. If you do that, then for the sake of the others on the system, please do not post a dramatic "Goodbye!" message. This convinces the troll that he is winning the battle. There is, perhaps, no message you can write on a message system that is as damaging as an announcement that you are leaving because of the hostility that the troll has kindled. If you feel you must say something, a discreet message to the system operator (and some of the others users, if you have their email addresses) is the best course of action." (same site link)
  6. In your face
    Joined
    21 Aug '04
    Moves
    55993
    26 Sep '13 23:52
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    [b]"What Can be Done about Trolls?"

    "When you suspect that somebody is a troll, you might try responding with a polite, mild message to see if it's just somebody in a bad mood. Internet users sometimes let their passions get away from them when seated safely behind their keyboard. If you ignore their bluster and respond in a pleasant mann ...[text shortened]... others users, if you have their email addresses) is the best course of action." (same site link)[/b]
    "Goodbye!"
  7. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    USA
    Joined
    14 Jul '07
    Moves
    43012
    27 Sep '13 00:191 edit
    "Why Do They Do It?"

    Affirmation.


    "Regular net users know how delightful it is when somebody responds to something they have written. It is a meeting of the minds, which is an intellectual thrill, but it is also an acknowledgement of one's value — and that can be a very satisfying emotional reward. Trolls crave attention, and they care not whether it is positive or negative. They see the Internet as a mirror into which they can gaze in narcissistic rapture. If you want a deeper analysis than that, perhaps a psychologist can shed some additional light on the matter."

    "Why Does it Matter?"

    "Some people — particularly those who have been online for years — are not upset by trolls and consider them an inevitable hazard of using the net. As the saying goes, "You can't have a picnic without ants." It would be nice if everybody was so easy-going, but the sad fact is that trolls do discourage people. Established posters may leave a message board because of the arguments that trolls ignite, and lurkers (people who read but do not post) may decide that they do not want to expose themselves to abuse and thus never get involved. < [May be part of the cause of this forum's decline.]

    Another problem is that the negative emotions stirred up by trolls leak over into other discussions. Normally affable people can become bitter after reading an angry interchange between a troll and his victims, and this can poison previously friendly interactions between long-time users. Finally, trolls create a paranoid environment, such that a casual criticism by a new arrival can elicit a ferocious and inappropriate backlash.

    The Internet is a wonderful resource which is breaking down barriers and stripping away prejudice. Trolls threaten our continued enjoyment of this beautiful forum for ideas." (same site)
  8. Joined
    06 Feb '13
    Moves
    13105
    27 Sep '13 06:47
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    [b]"Why Do They Do It?"

    Affirmation.


    "Regular net users know how delightful it is when somebody responds to something they have written. It is a meeting of the minds, which is an intellectual thrill, but it is also an acknowledgement of one's value — and that can be a very satisfying emotional reward. Trolls crave attention, and they care not ...[text shortened]... ejudice. Trolls threaten our continued enjoyment of this beautiful forum for ideas." (same site)[/b]
    Example: IQ thread. Lovely thread GB. That was very useful for me and I'm sure it will be for others.
  9. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    USA
    Joined
    14 Jul '07
    Moves
    43012
    27 Sep '13 18:571 edit
    * My Soapbox, My Audience The Problem: Abstraction

    "The word "abstraction", as used here, has a double meaning. In the first case, it refers to the dictionary definition: "absence of mind or preoccupation". It also refers to seeing others online as abstract concepts as opposed to real human beings. When we're online, we can get so wrapped up in what we're writing that we forget that we are addressing living, breathing people. This can come out in several ways. We may speak as if we were broadcasting — a one-way communication — ignoring the input of others. We may be seduced by the insulation of distance to exhibit what I call "keyboard bravery": the tendency to speak with more boldness or even hostility than we would in a face-to-face encounter.

    When people are called to task for speaking in a bellicose manner, they may defend themselves by saying, "I'm just saying what I think", or "I'm just being honest". Yet they would be well advised to read their own words back out loud before clicking on the "Send" button. They may be surprised at how hostile or bombastic they sound. It is significant that the problem of abstraction comes up less frequently in online chat rooms. When people are interacting more directly, they tend to choose their words more carefully."

    * I'm Right; You're Wrong The Problem: Polarity

    "The digital world is a binary world; computers work with zero and one — true and false. In a striking parallel, people in online discussions often seek Yes/No answers rather than compromise.
    Rather than seeking a middle ground, a struggle arises to determine who is right and who is wrong. If the truth lies somewhere in between, there can rarely be a resolution, and the debate can continue indefinitely."

    * You're Right; I'm Wrong The Problem: Ego

    "One wag once remarked that the sentence typed least often on the Internet is "I was wrong".
    It is indeed hard for us to admit defeat, especially if we have typed several impassioned messages establishing our position. We are afraid to lose face, or we do not know how to concede gracefully. This problem is sometimes related to that of polarity: we may feel that we have to be right or wrong. We may also think that an issue must be resolved in a single post. Yet we can often deflect an argument simply by responding, "Yes, that makes sense." We do not have to make a formal surrender!" (same source)
Back to Top