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General Forum

  1. SubscriberFMF
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    08 Mar '16 23:19
    Did you do much rote learning when you were young? Did it have any specific benefits or influence that you have felt in your adult life?

    The "etc." in the thread title invites you to share or discuss any other educational practices you experienced when younger that may not be in vogue anymore.
  2. SubscriberKewpie
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    09 Mar '16 05:371 edit
    I credit the learning of "times tables" to my discovery of patterns in number sequences.
    I credit the learning of alphabets to my enjoyment of word games, and my addiction to correct spelling. You may see that as a negative. 😕
  3. SubscriberFMF
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    09 Mar '16 05:55
    Originally posted by Kewpie
    I credit the learning of "times tables" to my discovery of patterns in number sequences.
    I credit the learning of alphabets to my enjoyment of word games, and my addiction to correct spelling. You may see that as a negative. 😕
    I was drilled mercilessly on the times tables [and some other things] by my older sister so that I could pass an exam to get into a Catholic private school when I was 8. In my adult years I have definitely observed that people who did not actually sit down and do this at some point are often at a slight disadvantage with mental arithmetic.
  4. Standard memberptobler
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    09 Mar '16 06:36
    I didn't experience it myself, thank heavens, but the "Whole Language" method of learning to read seemed to be in vogue here in Australia for many years until someone saw the light and restored phonics as the method of teaching children to read.
  5. SubscriberFMF
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    09 Mar '16 06:49
    Originally posted by ptobler
    I didn't experience it myself, thank heavens, but the "Whole Language" method of learning to read seemed to be in vogue here in Australia for many years until someone saw the light and restored phonics as the method of teaching children to read.
    I was of the sub-set of my generation that had the phonics experiment tried out on them - and I lived up north at the time which is where the Southeast England-dominated British government always likes to try out its dodgy experiments (cf: the late 80s Poll Tax tried out in Scotland) - and I thought it was a failure and that people a year or two younger than me (or older than me) were spared it. If I meet Brits who are more or less the same age as me and who were up north in the late 60s, we swap stories about how our ability to spell correctly was damaged [AND about Blue Peter v Magpie]. Am I mistaken about all this and got the terminology wrong?
  6. SubscriberFMF
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    09 Mar '16 06:56
    Originally posted by Kewpie
    I credit the learning of "times tables" to my discovery of patterns in number sequences.
    I credit the learning of alphabets to my enjoyment of word games, and my addiction to correct spelling. You may see that as a negative. 😕
    Between 1991 and 1992, I studied and learnt a language which I went on later to speak fluently. The communicative methodology used on me was perfect and living in the culture where the language was used for real was a crucial conducive factor, but whichever you slice the circumstances in which I picked up the language, I cannot get away from the fact that the good solid base I laid down and the early progress I made was based firmly on no-frills, not-trendy, hard work memorizing new vocabulary and being led through vocabulary and sentence drills. For someone with a brain/talent for languages ~ i.e. not me ~ this may not be so necessary, I don't know. But it was for me.
  7. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    10 Mar '16 10:10
    Rote learning only makes sense for sequences that do not have any sense.
    ie
    Why learn multiplication tables without the fundamental reasons why.
    Why learn to spell aukward words? 😉 (Learn to use SPELLCHECKER)

    Learn by rote your alphabet - it still has some use.
    Learn by rote the QWERTY keyboard.

    Don't learn the Periodic Table! (There is always a poster up on the Chem Lab wall!!!)
    Don't learn poems (you will miss out on their beauty and subtlety)
  8. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    10 Mar '16 10:11
    Originally posted by FMF
    I was of the sub-set of my generation that had the phonics experiment tried out on them - and I lived up north at the time which is where the Southeast England-dominated British government always likes to try out its dodgy experiments (cf: the late 80s Poll Tax tried out in Scotland) - and I thought it was a failure and that people a year or two younger than me ...[text shortened]... ged [AND about Blue Peter v Magpie]. Am I mistaken about all this and got the terminology wrong?
    You are probably referring to the ITA (Initial Teaching Alphabet) experiment.

    Current best practice in UK is to use a Synthetic Phonic approach eg "Jolly Phonics"©
  9. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    10 Mar '16 10:14
    Originally posted by Kewpie
    I credit the learning of "times tables" to my discovery of patterns in number sequences.
    I credit the learning of alphabets to my enjoyment of word games, and my addiction to correct spelling. You may see that as a negative. 😕
    As a teacher I prefer to "teach the patterns". 😀
  10. SubscriberFMF
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    10 Mar '16 10:36
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    You are probably referring to the ITA (Initial Teaching Alphabet) experiment.

    Current best practice in UK is to use a Synthetic Phonic approach eg "Jolly Phonics"©
    OK, so I got the terminology wrong. Apologies to ptobler.
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