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General Forum

  1. SubscriberFMF
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    06 Oct '16 03:351 edit
    This thread is not intended for support or condemnation of 'Political Correctness'.

    Instead, it invites you to offer examples of when you find yourself applying any principles or policies [that might plausibly owe much to 'Political Correctness'] - not so much because you are obliged to, but because it seems like the right thing to do ~ or at least aspire to.
  2. SubscriberFMF
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    06 Oct '16 04:041 edit
    I was recently supplying a programme a friend produces on a community radio station in the UK with a stock of suitable "good" music to play during their show (which is about local football but features quite a bit of music).

    Now, although - with things being the way they are, and my tastes being what they are - probably only about 20-25% of the songs that would be candidates for such a compilation of good stuff (by which I mean my favourite stuff) were performed by women, while 75-80% had male voices coming out of the speakers.

    And yet, when I eventually selected the four or so hours' worth of stuff (out of the 20,000 or so hours I've got in my music collection) and sent it to my friend, I'd ended up with a more or less 50-50 split of women singing and men singing.

    The compilation was still excellent and benefited from the diversity of singing voices heard, but I think some mild sense of political correctness bore down on me and had me ending up with that 50-50 split.

    Does anyone else ever find their decisions or actions moulded by mild political correctness concerns (that don't rankle) like this in other endeavours or activities?
  3. Dumnonia
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    06 Oct '16 06:16
    Originally posted by FMF
    I was recently supplying a programme a friend produces on a community radio station in the UK with a stock of suitable "good" music to play during their show (which is about local football but features quite a bit of music).

    Now, although - with things being the way they are, and my tastes being what they are - probably only about 20-25% of the songs that wo ...[text shortened]... political correctness concerns (that don't rankle) like this in other endeavours or activities?
    I meant to follow up with you about this and your use of my brand, personal image rights and intellectual property.
  4. SubscriberPonderable
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    13 Oct '16 12:52
    Originally posted by FMF
    This thread is not intended for support or condemnation of 'Political Correctness'.

    Instead, it invites you to offer examples of when you find yourself applying any principles or policies [that might plausibly owe much to 'Political Correctness'] - not so much because you are obliged to, but because it seems like the right thing to do ~ or at least aspire to.
    The only case I do that is when i realize I use the masculine form when talking (writing) largely about females.
  5. Mar-a-Lago
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    13 Oct '16 13:26
    Originally posted by FMF
    I was recently supplying a programme a friend produces on a community radio station in the UK with a stock of suitable "good" music to play during their show (which is about local football but features quite a bit of music).

    Now, although - with things being the way they are, and my tastes being what they are - probably only about 20-25% of the songs that wo ...[text shortened]... political correctness concerns (that don't rankle) like this in other endeavours or activities?
    Next time send him some songs sung by gay cripples.
  6. Joined
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    13 Oct '16 15:281 edit
    For a few months of the civil rights era I was employed as a part time janitor while in high school. The lawn mower repair shop catered especially to the many lawn maintenance workers (who were generally self-employed individuals with helpers, and were generally under the income tax radar). One day a black man came in needing a repair and I happened to be the first one he came upon. He explained his problem and I told him I'd get him helped. I snagged an employees and took him to the man, and said "This colored man needs help with (whatever it was). The employee was only a parts man so he went and sent a repairman out. During the wait I reconsidered saying "colored" so when the repair man came out I said ("This other man needs...), figuring that the black man would think I had said that initially. This was before "black" was established as the PC term -- although a stricter PC advocate would question why not just say "man."

    A minor incident, but I remember it.
  7. Standard memberyo its me
    watch the acid...
    dosen't get you!!
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    14 Oct '16 07:321 edit
    Originally posted by JS357
    For a few months of the civil rights era I was employed as a part time janitor while in high school. The lawn mower repair shop catered especially to the many lawn maintenance workers (who were generally self-employed individuals with helpers, and were generally under the income tax radar). One day a black man came in needing a repair and I happened to be the ...[text shortened]... icter PC advocate would question why not just say "man."

    A minor incident, but I remember it.
    Google are celebrating Britain's most famous 'Black' woman today.
    I wonder who Britain's most famous 'White' woman is?
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/mary-seacole-google-doodle-a7360576.html
  8. Joined
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    15 Oct '16 14:58
    😀
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