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General Forum

  1. Joined
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    11 Sep '13 01:15
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    Have you seen "Amadeus"?
    Yes, I loved the music but not the movie's general style. I would watch it again though and reappraise it, as it does have a mysterious draw for me despite Mozart seeming to be modelled on Bon Jovi.
  2. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    11 Sep '13 01:46
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    Yes, I loved the music but not the movie's general style. I would watch it again though and reappraise it, as it does have a mysterious draw for me despite Mozart seeming to be modelled on Bon Jovi.
    "Mozart seeming to be modelled on Bon Jovi."

    That's the parallel that fits. Didn't you think the frequent silly laughing was gratuitous and distracting? Imagine the jealousy Mozart provoked. What small wealthy men they were in their banding together to perpetrate petty subterfuge.
  3. Joined
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    11 Sep '13 01:54
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    Didn't you think the frequent silly laughing was gratuitous and distracting? Imagine the jealousy Mozart provoked. What small wealthy men they were in their banding together to perpetrate petty subterfuge.
    Oh God, don't remind me of that laughing! Ruined what could have been essentialy a very good film. I have no memory of the plot, but I recently read on the forums here that the treatment of Salieri in Amadeus was quite unfair.
  4. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    11 Sep '13 02:07
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    Oh God, don't remind me of that laughing! Ruined what could have been essentialy a very good film. I have no memory of the plot, but I recently read on the forums here that the treatment of Salieri in Amadeus was quite unfair.
    Salieri was intent on stealing his original manuscripts of which Mozart kept no copies. Why? Because Salieri was a jealous, second rate composer whose intent was to plagiarize if not claim they were his own. He hired a maid to obtain them.
  5. Joined
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    11 Sep '13 02:11
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    Salieri was intent on stealing his original manuscripts of which Mozart kept no copies. Why? Because Salieri was a jealous, second rate composer whose intent was to plagiarize if not claim they were his own. He hired a maid to obtain them.
    Maybe I remembered it wrongly. I think someone said he was by no means second-rate as a composer, at least.
  6. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    11 Sep '13 02:19
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason

    Maybe I remembered it wrongly. I think someone said he was by no means second-rate as a composer, at least.
    Plot Summary for
    Amadeus (1984) More at IMDbPro »
    "Antonio Salieri believes that Mozart's music is divine. He wishes he was himself as good a musician as Mozart so that he can praise the Lord through composing. But he can't understand why God favored Mozart, such a vulgar creature, to be his instrument. Salieri's envy has made him an enemy of God whose greatness was evident in Mozart. He is set to take revenge." Written by Khaled Salem

    "Claiming to have murdered the composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the now elderly Antonio Salieri recounts to a priest his dealings with the brilliant composer. Salieri was court composer to Austrian Emperor Joseph II when Mozart and he first met. The Emperor, a major patron of the arts, immediately commissioned Mozart to write an opera in German, rather than the customary Italian. Mozart is childish, arrogant, annoying and brilliant all at once and Salieri is simultaneously in awe and green with envy at his genius. Salieri uses Mozart's difficult relationship with his father and his guilt over being a bad son to drive him slightly mad and into a downward spiral of ill health, leading to his death." Written by garykmcd

    Plot Synopsis: The story begins in 1823 as the elderly Salieri attempts suicide by slitting his throat while loudly begging forgiveness for having killed Mozart in 1791." See more... / This summary should help us with the details. -Bob
  7. Joined
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    11 Sep '13 02:31
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    Plot Summary for
    Amadeus (1984) More at IMDbPro »
    "Antonio Salieri believes that Mozart's music is divine. He wishes he was himself as good a musician as Mozart so that he can praise the Lord through composing. But he can't understand why God favored Mozart, such a vulgar creature, to be his instrument. Salieri's envy has made him an enemy of God w ...[text shortened]... illed Mozart in 1791." See more... / This summary should help us with the details. -Bob
    Historical accuracy
    Shaffer used artistic license in his portrayals of both Mozart and Salieri. Documentary evidence suggests that there was some antipathy between the two men, but the idea that Salieri was the instigator of Mozart's demise is not taken seriously by scholars of the men's lives and careers. While historically there may have been actual rivalry and tension between Mozart and Salieri, there is also evidence that they enjoyed a relationship marked by mutual respect.[1] As an example, Salieri later tutored Mozart's son Franz Xaver Wolfgang Mozart in music. He also conducted some of Mozart's works, both in Mozart's lifetime and afterwards.[2]

    Writer David Cairns called Amadeus "myth-mongering" and argued against Shaffer's alleged portrait of Mozart as "two contradictory beings, sublime artist and fool", positing instead that Mozart was "fundamentally well-integrated". Cairns also rejects the "romantic legend" that Mozart always wrote out perfect manuscripts of works already completely composed in his head, citing major and prolonged revisions to several manuscripts (see: Mozart's compositional method).[citation needed]

    Source: Wikipedia article on Amadeus
  8. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    11 Sep '13 02:49
    Originally posted by NoEarthlyReason
    Historical accuracy
    Shaffer used artistic license in his portrayals of both Mozart and Salieri. Documentary evidence suggests that there was some antipathy between the two men, but the idea that Salieri was the instigator of Mozart's demise is not taken seriously by scholars of the men's lives and careers. While historically there may have been actu ...[text shortened]... s compositional method).[citation needed]

    Source: Wikipedia article on Amadeus
    What poetic license was taken in the writing and on the screen. Manipulations of fact may explain the exaggerated portrayals of both main characters. Thank you. We should do this again sometime when there's nothing worth watching on TV. lol
  9. Joined
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    11 Sep '13 03:06
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    What poetic license was taken in the writing and on the screen. Manipulations of fact may explain the exaggerated portrayals of both main characters. Thank you. We should do this again sometime when there's nothing worth watching on TV. lol
    You're welcome. It's very easy for popular misconceptions to arise on historical matters, especially when caused by TV and film writers.
  10. SubscriberPonderable
    chemist
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    25 Sep '13 17:20
    my wife, still.
  11. SubscriberPonderable
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    11 Nov '13 11:36
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    o Any human being of any age characterized by the absence of clever
    deceptions, cowardice, malice and guile in their words and deeds.
    In one word:

    Babies!
  12. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    11 Nov '13 17:41
    Originally posted by Ponderable
    In one word:

    Babies!
    .... in the sense of childlike qualities such as the wonder of discovery, intensity at play, honesty, daydreaming and whimsy.
  13. Unknown Territories
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    11 Nov '13 23:38
    Shaft of early-afternoon window-filtered sunlight on the small of a woman's back--- precisely at that moment before she turns her face toward me--- that moment when she could literally be any woman, I any man.
  14. Standard memberChessPraxis
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    12 Nov '13 00:40
    Kittens
  15. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
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    13 Nov '13 23:32
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH

    Shaft of early-afternoon window-filtered sunlight on the small of a woman's back--- precisely at that moment before she turns her face toward me--- that moment when she could literally be any woman, I any man.
    "Shaft of early-afternoon window-filtered sunlight on the small of a woman's back--- precisely at that moment before she turns her face toward me--- that moment when she could literally be any woman, I any man." (FreakyKBH)

    Our Mother Tongue on those rare occasions when memorable observations like this one result. Thanks, Freaky.
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