General Forum

General Forum

  1. Subscribermoonbus
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    04 Aug '17 11:12
    In German, there is a word, "Ohrwurm", literally "ear worm", which means an annoying tune or refrain you can't get out of your head. Like that blasted jingle you heard in a tv advert last night, or the current Ariana Grande hit (I need to be the one who takes you home) which my teenage daughters play incessantly, etc.

    Any further suggestions from other languages?
  2. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    04 Aug '17 11:18
    Originally posted by @moonbus
    [bAny further suggestions from other languages?[/b]
    whanau
    /ˈfɑːnaʊ/
    NZ noun
    plural noun: whanau

    an extended family or community of related families who live together in the same area.
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    04 Aug '17 15:00
    kanata. Huron ( Iroquoian language ) meaning “village.” Adopted and changed to Canada.
  4. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
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    04 Aug '17 15:06
    Atama ga warui. (Japanese).

    Literally, 'bad in the head' = Stupid.
  5. Standard memberHandyAndy
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    04 Aug '17 16:47
    Originally posted by @ghost-of-a-duke
    Atama ga warui. (Japanese).

    Literally, 'bad in the head' = Stupid.
    Is it more useful to say "atama ga warui" rather than "stupid"?
  6. SubscriberFMF
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    04 Aug '17 16:571 edit
    Where I am: "ngawur", which doesn't translate well into English. If at all. In fact, it's hard to say exactly what it means. But it's a very useful word nevertheless. Say it at any time, in any situation, and people will be impressed by your insight. Whatever that insight might have been perceived as being.
  7. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
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    04 Aug '17 17:251 edit
    Originally posted by @handyandy
    Is it more useful to say "atama ga warui" rather than "stupid"?
    Indeed it is sir, if you want to call somebody stupid without them realising.

    I say it to my Manager all the time (having previously told them it meant 'good idea' ).
  8. Subscribermoonbus
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    04 Aug '17 18:11
    atama ga warui 1200 pounds > my Swiss bank account = very good idea!

    πŸ™‚
  9. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
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    04 Aug '17 18:42
    Originally posted by @moonbus
    atama ga warui 1200 pounds > my Swiss bank account = very good idea!

    πŸ™‚
    πŸ™‚

    I've created a monster.
  10. Subscribermoonbus
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    04 Aug '17 18:47
    "It's alive!

    -- Dr. Frankenstein
  11. Gothenburg
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    04 Aug '17 18:54
    'Lagom' is a very useful Swedish word. It is close to 'enough' or 'moderate' or 'adequate'. It's so very typically Swedish because that's how we are most of the time - never exaggerate, never express much emotions, never get too angry etc etc - just 'lagom'.
  12. Standard memberHandyAndy
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    04 Aug '17 20:07
    Schadenfreude ~ Enjoying another person's misfortune.
  13. Subscribermoonbus
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    04 Aug '17 21:08
    Ah yes, Schadenfreude. Reminds me of a word peculiar to Swiss dialect, though Germans would understand it if they heard it: "Wohlweh." It translates as "pleasure-pain," the feeling when an aching muscle is massaged, for example, or when you scratch an itch until it bleeds. Ahhhhh-ouch!
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    04 Aug '17 21:42
    Originally posted by @handyandy
    Schadenfreude ~ Enjoying another person's misfortune.
    That's a favourite of mine. The Germans have many brilliant words:

    Kummerspeck (Grief bacon)

    When a relationship ends or during other times of sadness, anger, or worry, it’s common to put on a few pounds of Kummerspeck. What it means is the excess weight put on by emotional overeating. So when you find yourself on the couch watching “Bridget Jones’ Diary” with a tub of ice cream, you are in fact feeding your grief bacon.
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    04 Aug '17 22:00
    Originally posted by @drewnogal
    That's a favourite of mine. The Germans have many brilliant words:
    Backpfeifengesicht: Michael Gove.
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