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  1. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    19 Jan '08 10:25 / 1 edit
    In looking for an area to focus additional chess study, I'm not sure I know what I should do in terms of "studying" tactics and strategy. Seeing as I know the basic tactical elements of chess (forks, pins, skewers, x-ray attacks, deflection, windmill, etc.) and the basic strategic elements of chess (knight outposts, open bishop diagonals, open rook files, pawn structure, etc.), what exactly is necessary to "study" these elements of chess on a more advanced level? Does advanced "study" refer to rote practice (something along the lines of CTS)? Does advanced "study" refer to looking at masters' games?

    In short, how does one go about advanced tactics and strategy "study"?
  2. Standard member Ragnorak
    For RHP addons...
    19 Jan '08 11:12
    Originally posted by wittywonka
    In looking for an area to focus additional chess study, I'm not sure I know what I should do in terms of "studying" tactics and strategy. Seeing as I know the basic tactical elements of chess (forks, pins, skewers, x-ray attacks, deflection, windmill, etc.) and the basic strategic elements of chess (knight outposts, open bishop diagonals, o ...[text shortened]... rs' games?

    In short, how does one go about advanced tactics and strategy "study"?
    If you've read an introduction to tactics like Winning Chess Tactics, then I'd recommend Understand Chess Tactics, which tells you not what a tactic is, but the signs of one being possible. It's truly an excellent read.

    D
  3. 19 Jan '08 11:25
    Originally posted by wittywonka
    In looking for an area to focus additional chess study, I'm not sure I know what I should do in terms of "studying" tactics and strategy. Seeing as I know the basic tactical elements of chess (forks, pins, skewers, x-ray attacks, deflection, windmill, etc.) and the basic strategic elements of chess (knight outposts, open bishop diagonals, o ...[text shortened]... rs' games?

    In short, how does one go about advanced tactics and strategy "study"?
    You could try and tackle something like The Art of Attack, which assumes a decent knowledge of both tactics and positional play and would take that then to a very advanced level.

    Barring that I'm not sure what else to recommend. What have you read lately?
  4. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    19 Jan '08 11:47
    Originally posted by scandium
    You could try and tackle something like The Art of Attack, which assumes a decent knowledge of both tactics and positional play and would take that then to a very advanced level.

    Barring that I'm not sure what else to recommend. What have you read lately?
    Learning tactics, I never relied on one book in particular; I read a handful of more chess introductory books and online websites. Then I played hundreds of games.

    As for strategy, it was a pretty gradual learning experience, too, but I eventually bought Winning Chess Strategies by Yassir Seirawan and most of my knowledge of chess strategy comes from it.

    I've also bought a book on an opening, but that really doesn't count.

    That's pretty much it, and unfortunately that's part of my undecidedness; I really haven't read that many books, so I don't know what I need or want to buy.
  5. 19 Jan '08 12:01
    Originally posted by wittywonka
    Learning tactics, I never relied on one book in particular; I read a handful of more chess introductory books and online websites. Then I played hundreds of games.

    As for strategy, it was a pretty gradual learning experience, too, but I eventually bought Winning Chess Strategies by Yassir Seirawan and most of my knowledge of chess strategy come ...[text shortened]... edness; I really haven't read that many books, so I don't know what I need or want to buy.
    You might want to work on some more intermediate books then before tackling the Art of Attack. Some ideas from my own collection:

    My System
    Judgment and Planning in Chess by Euwe (descriptive)
    Modern Chess Strategy by Pachman (descriptive)

    I've ranked them in a rough order of difficulty based on my feel for them in skimming through them over the years. Of course there are many (and newer) alternatives out there too; these books were considered among the definitive books on strategy in their day though, and all 3 have stood up well to the test of time.

    I have no recommendations tactics wise because I have no truly intermediate tactics books; all of mine but one are probably no more sophisticated the one you've already read. The other, which seems excellent, is How to Become a Deadly Chess Tactician by Lemoir but its by no means an easy read and some fairly decent tactical ability is prerequisite to getting the most out of it (I only read the first chapter). You could always pick it up and try it to see if you're ready for it, and if not work through a more intermediate book first.
  6. Standard member Ragnorak
    For RHP addons...
    19 Jan '08 12:33
    Originally posted by wittywonka
    Learning tactics, I never relied on one book in particular; I read a handful of more chess introductory books and online websites. Then I played hundreds of games.

    As for strategy, it was a pretty gradual learning experience, too, but I eventually bought Winning Chess Strategies by Yassir Seirawan and most of my knowledge of chess strategy come ...[text shortened]... edness; I really haven't read that many books, so I don't know what I need or want to buy.
    Then, definitely buy Understanding Chess Tactics. A primer for that might be Winning Chess Tactics, but you may not learn a whole pile from that.

    Silman's Reassess your Chess is a great follow on read to Winning Chess Strategies.

    D
  7. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    19 Jan '08 12:38
    Originally posted by Ragnorak
    Then, definitely buy Understanding Chess Tactics. A primer for that might be Winning Chess Tactics, but you may not learn a whole pile from that.

    Silman's Reassess your Chess is a great follow on read to Winning Chess Strategies.

    D
    Alright, I'll look into it. Much appreciated.
  8. Standard member wittywonka
    Chocolate Expert
    19 Jan '08 12:44 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by scandium
    ...these books were considered among the definitive books on strategy in their day though, and all 3 have stood up well to the test of time...
    I looked them up on Amazon, and a few of the review writers felt the complete opposite about that; one even reccommended a companion to My System that was supposedly a list of improvements since.

    But again, with a companion, I might look into buying them together.

    I appreciated the advice.
  9. 19 Jan '08 12:49
    Originally posted by wittywonka
    In looking for an area to focus additional chess study, I'm not sure I know what I should do in terms of "studying" tactics and strategy. Seeing as I know the basic tactical elements of chess (forks, pins, skewers, x-ray attacks, deflection, windmill, etc.) and the basic strategic elements of chess (knight outposts, open bishop diagonals, o ...[text shortened]... rs' games?

    In short, how does one go about advanced tactics and strategy "study"?
    Averbakh's "Chess Tactics for Advanced Players," will give you a lot of the theory of attacking play. The whole premise of the book is that the key to tactics is the double attack. He progresses backwards from conducting successful attacks, to maneuvering to get these positions.