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  1. 13 Jul '13 02:37
    What should complete beginners play against the caro-kann?
  2. 13 Jul '13 03:29
    I routinely play the Caro-kann. The most difficult line against it is the advance variation. I hate it. It takes me about 8 - 10 moves to equalize, if I can at all. it makes development of the king's side knight very difficult. Essentially, I have to trade off the white bishop early, then play c5 to counter attack the center. This works, but it isn't exactly what you call "development" try the advance variation.
  3. 13 Jul '13 04:35
    Originally posted by chaddavis14
    I routinely play the Caro-kann. The most difficult line against it is the advance variation. I hate it. It takes me about 8 - 10 moves to equalize, if I can at all. it makes development of the king's side knight very difficult. Essentially, I have to trade off the white bishop early, then play c5 to counter attack the center. This works, but it isn't exactly what you call "development" try the advance variation.
    So you think that if I were a complete beginner, I should try the advanced variation? It's not too complicated for a 1000?
  4. 13 Jul '13 08:08 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by chaddavis14
    I routinely play the Caro-kann. The most difficult line against it is the advance variation. I hate it. It takes me about 8 - 10 moves to equalize, if I can at all. it makes development of the king's side knight very difficult. Essentially, I have to trade off the white bishop early, then play c5 to counter attack the center. This works, but it isn't exactly what you call "development" try the advance variation.
    the trick to play against the advance variation is to play a pawn sacrifice, no ...Bf5, but 3...c5! If white wants to keep his pawn he must make some unusual moves to do so and we get an easy game of it.
  5. Subscriber Ragwort
    Ex Duris Gloria
    13 Jul '13 10:07
    Originally posted by hamworld
    What should complete beginners play against the caro-kann?
  6. 13 Jul '13 13:13 / 2 edits
  7. 13 Jul '13 13:15
    Originally posted by robbie carrobie
    the trick to play against the advance variation is to play a pawn sacrifice, no ...Bf5, but 3...c5! If white wants to keep his pawn he must make some unusual moves to do so and we get an easy game of it.
    Oh thanks!! That sounds good. could you please post a game or two that illustrate this?

    I appreciate it.

    Chad
  8. 13 Jul '13 13:16
    Originally posted by hamworld
    So you think that if I were a complete beginner, I should try the advanced variation? It's not too complicated for a 1000?
    Its a very straight forward defense. you will do fine with it at 1000.
  9. 13 Jul '13 13:22
    Originally posted by chaddavis14
    Its a very straight forward defense. you will do fine with it at 1000.
    I thought it was an offence, since 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 is white's move?

    *is confused*
  10. 13 Jul '13 13:33
    Hi Hammy

    "I should try the advanced variation? It's not too complicated for a 1000?"

    Nothing is too complicated for a 1000 player. They don't have complications.

    They can go out and have loads of fun whilst the game is still new to them.
    They should play worry free chess and just blast away picking up wee ideas
    and lessons as they go along. The less they know the more they learn.
    This is their childhood, let them enjoy it.

    Don't keep them inside on a warm sunny day memorising opening variations,
    let them go out and terrorise the neighbour with their Queens so they come
    back with skint kees, scratches from stingy nettles and bloody noses.

    The minute they start filling their heads with opening variations and
    nothing else then it will get too complicated and then everything will
    become overwhelming.

    Losing sleep over what opening you are going to play comes later,
    much much later when you are a better player and have a better understanding
    of the game and have a leaning towards a particuliar style.

    Think Development, Centre and Tempo in all openings and nothing else.
    You will soon discover that DCT applies to all common openings and they
    play themselves. You just need to now why you are making a move and
    have a reason for making it. As oppossed to to just making any old move
    because it is your turn to move.

  11. 13 Jul '13 15:59
    Originally posted by chaddavis14
    Oh thanks!! That sounds good. could you please post a game or two that illustrate this?

    I appreciate it.

    Chad
    dig this chad my good man, I cannot post the game here because the pgn function does not support multiple variations, sadly,

    http://www.chess.com/blog/robbie_1969/system-against-caro-kann-advanced-variation2

    any questions please let me know - regards Robbie.
  12. 14 Jul '13 01:48
    Of course, you're very right greenpawn. Thing is, I'm stuck. I can't find any effective free resources on studying endgames. If I were a 1000 and I could afford so, which endgame books should I buy?

    I also can't see an endgame specialist or an expert tactician playing 1. e4 c6 2. a3?
  13. 14 Jul '13 22:52
    My recommendation for beginners would be to (1)open the position and (2)rapidly develop... the best system that meets those needs would be the Panov Botvinnik Attack. IMO win or lose you will learn more than in the main lines.
  14. Standard member ptobler
    Patzer
    15 Jul '13 00:33
    Originally posted by hamworld
    Of course, you're very right greenpawn. Thing is, I'm stuck. I can't find any effective free resources on studying endgames. If I were a 1000 and I could afford so, which endgame books should I buy?

    I also can't see an endgame specialist or an expert tactician playing 1. e4 c6 2. a3?
    IMHO the best endgame book is "Fundamental Chess Endings" (Mueller and Lamprecht) - also "Secrets of Pawn Endings" (no coincidence - by the same authors)
  15. 15 Jul '13 11:03
    Originally posted by uncovered
    My recommendation for beginners would be to (1)open the position and (2)rapidly develop... the best system that meets those needs would be the Panov Botvinnik Attack. IMO win or lose you will learn more than in the main lines.
    Its quite interesting observation, The CK player must of course be able to meet all of these attempts, advance, panov botvinnic, exchange etc etc I myself like the CK but its a passive choice and is not to everyone's taste.